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  • Technorati: graph / links

    The Haiti disaster


    by Rumbold on 16th January, 2010 at 12:43 PM    

    The Disasters and Emergency Committee (DEC) is co-ordinating the British response to the disaster:

    £25 will supply a kit of household essentials.
    £50 buys a food pack to feed a family for a fortnight.
    £100 provides temporary shelter for two families

    To make a donation to the DEC Haiti appeal visit www.dec.org.uk or call 0370 60 60 900, donate over the counter at any post office or high street bank, or send a cheque made payable to ‘DEC Haiti Earthquake Appeal’ to ‘PO Box 999, London, EC3A 3AA’.

    Donations here.


         
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    Filed in: Current affairs






    5 Comments below   |   Add your own

    Reactions: Twitter, blogs


    1. Papa Doc — on 16th January, 2010 at 2:23 PM  

      If you can all bite the head off a rooster and sprinkle the blood around a bit, Baron Samedi will appear in the dreams of Bill Gates, a thousand or so Russian Oligarchs and Fred the Shred, convincing them all to pump so much dosh into Haiti that we’ll all want to move there.

    2. halima — on 16th January, 2010 at 3:25 PM  

      Dear Rumbold

      Thanks for posting this link. I’ve been a bit numbed by the scale of this disaster. I can never find the right words to express what I feel when news of yet another natural disaster hits a struggling and troubled country.

    3. George — on 16th January, 2010 at 5:39 PM  

      Sure HAITI is the ultimate disaster. This tortured nation has been punished by successive Euro imperialists from the start. Here’s a bit of history.

      In the mid-18th century, France clashed with Spain and grabbed the western half of Hispaniola which they called St Domingue (later Haiti). The eastern half, Santo Domingo, remained Spanish.

      In 1789, St Domingue was populated by 30,000 whites, 40,000 mixed race and half a million black African slaves. It was France’s richest colony producing sugar, coffee, cotton, indigo and tobacco – all by slave labour.
      1789 was also the year the French revolution began with its cry of ‘Liberty, Equality, Fraternity’. But as with the US Independence in 1776, the equality was not for the blacks. So the French Assembly decided that mixed race people in St Domingue would be free French citizens provided both parents were born in France – just 400 people. The blacks continued as slaves.

      On 14 August 1791, a great slave revolt broke out – the slaves slaughtered their masters and burnt their mansions. A slave army took shape under a coachman called Toussaint who had learnt to read and write. Within months, Toussaint’s army had captured all the ports on the north of the island.

      In Sept 1792, the French revolutionaries sent 3 commissioners and a new general, Laveaux, to St Domingue. In Aug 1793, the commissioners abolished slavery and in 1794, the Jacobins (new revolutionaries) had come to power in France. 3 delegates from St Domingue became representatives – a freed black slave, a mulatto and a white man. Toussaint threw in his lot with the convention. He also took a second name – L’Ouverture (opening to liberty).

      Meanwhile, the British sent 6000 men to St Dominque to dislodge the French. They fought for 4 years and lost 80,000 men. It was the heaviest defeat for the British. In 1798, Toussaint led his victorious army into the capital, Port-au-Prince.

      Now French dictator Napoleon Bonaparte had taken power in France in 1799. In 1802 he sent a huge expedition of crack troops under General Leclerc to crush Toussaint and restore slavery. In the first 6 months, the French lost 10,000 men. The beleaguered French generals offered Toussaint a treaty if he would appear in person to discuss it.
      He did so and was captured, taken to France and imprisoned in brutal conditions. Toussaint died of pneumonia in prison

    4. AHatian — on 17th January, 2010 at 2:53 AM  

      Can you change the name to The Disaster in Haiti?

    5. halima — on 17th January, 2010 at 3:19 AM  

      “One of the more interesting events in U.S. military history was the invasion of Haiti in 1915. Virtually unknown to the average American, this event would play an important role in U.S. foreign policy and help define the U.S. image in the Caribbean and Latin American nations” ( Associated Content online)

      A more recent update where the Americans took over from the traditional rivalry in Latin America/Caribbean where the Europeans left off.

      I was under the impression that Haiti ranked somwhere above Cuba in US relations - which perhaps has changed with the Obama administration.

      It is very reassuring to see that where disasters are concerned, the politics can be put aside.



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