The politics of the film Avatar


by Sunny
6th January, 2010 at 9:15 am    

I watched Avatar 3D on 1st January and loved it. Sure, the storyline was fairly predictable but that’s not what I wanted to watch it for. Also, forget the racial angle too, which several people have pointed out to me (see this tweet by Naadir). Sure you can always play the race card when you have different species / races involved but that wasn’t my main focus.

My main focus was the strong pro-environmental message, for I have always been much more of an environmentalist than someone being obsessed by race (no doubt this will come as a surprise to many readers, but this blog was started to talk about identity, not whatever passes through my head). That aside, what I also loved about it was the strong anti-war message.

Avatar could be crudely based on the European invasion (and massacre) of native Americans. The natives are pagans who worship the world around them while the new arrivals simply want resources. I’m reading Guns, Germs & Steel at the moment so that also came to mind (civilisations wiping each out over centuries for whatever reason). The natives can’t survive for long – especially if they’ve only got bows and arrows and flying dragons. They need some serious AK47s. That is how civilisation has developed.

But Avatar also had parallels with Iraq. The invasion was termed ‘shock and awe’, the humans were a mercenary force (Blackwater) and the resource could be equated with Iraqi oil. Naturally, and predictably, US Conservatives are slating the film, to no effect. The people have spoken with their wallets.

Avatar has a subtle message, which is why I like it even more. You can’t push pro-environment and anti-war crap down people’s throats in the form of Greenpeace or StWC leaflets. You make a beautiful film that people internalise those sentiments without even realising it.

But it also struck me that people’s emotions are generally quite left-wing. The biggest films like these are invariably about protecting stuff. I doubt anyone could make a successful film where killing polar bears and kittens, and frying the planet is seen as good. Hollywood isn’t left-wing because it wants to be, it is also that way because most people (and their hearts) are and that is where the money is.

Update: Sarah says she liked the fact I didn’t mention Jack Sully’s disability once in the review. But actually, I think that could also have been an issue. In real life Jack Sully can’t run like his Avatar.

As soon as he gets into the new world he’s running like mad because he can exercise those legs again. So in fact, while I don’t mention it – I can imagine a lot of writers out there annoyed at the portrayal that Jack Sully felt incomplete without his legs and preferred his dream-world for that reason.


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  1. pickles

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  8. The Politics Of Avatar « Same Difference

    [...] : "http%3A%2F%2Fsamedifference1.com%2F2010%2F01%2F07%2Fthe-politics-of-avatar%2F" } I love this review of Avatar by mainstream political blogger Sunny Hundal. Do you know what the best part about [...]


  9. Pickled Politics » The politics of the film Avatar

    [...] Pickled Politics » the politics of the film Avatar [...]




  1. Pat Kane — on 6th January, 2010 at 9:27 am  

    Yes but see my post on Avatar on http://www.theplayethic.com. There’s a deeper politics here…

  2. earwicga — on 6th January, 2010 at 9:33 am  

    Great to see a review where I know the reviewer has seen the same film as me! I was beginning to think there were two versions of Avatar from reading other mypoic reviews.

  3. cjcjc — on 6th January, 2010 at 9:39 am  

    Oh you motorbike-enthusiast, globe-trotting environmentalist you…

    But it also struck me that people’s emotions are generally quite left-wing

    Fortunately their brains are generally not!

    Plenty of anti big government movies as well as anti big business ones you know…

    In any event I don’t think I have the patience for 162 minutes of this kind of thing.

    My four favourite words in any theatre programme:
    “90 minutes no interval”.

  4. Sarah AB — on 6th January, 2010 at 9:45 am  

    For a completely different take on the film …

    http://www.spiked-online.com/index.php/site/article/7895/

    @cjcjc – I completely agree with you about ’90 minutes no interval’ – I so often think modern films could have been improved by cutting 20 minutes or so.

  5. cjcjc — on 6th January, 2010 at 10:07 am  

    There’s very little in life that wouldn’t be improved by such a cut!

  6. cjcjc — on 6th January, 2010 at 10:17 am  

    Interesting review.
    I’m sure James Cameron and the studio execs will not be giving up their private jets just yet.

    Meanwhile interesting to see the Irish green party has helped pass this little law:

    http://tendancecoatesy.wordpress.com/2010/01/04/irish-greens-impose-blasphemy-law/

  7. Dalbir — on 6th January, 2010 at 10:17 am  

    There’s very little in life that wouldn’t be improved by such a cut!

    What is that? Procircumcism propaganda? lol

  8. Don — on 6th January, 2010 at 10:49 am  

    How could the dominant species have evolved into humanoids when all the other fauna was hexapodal?

  9. bananabrain — on 6th January, 2010 at 11:14 am  

    what, dalbir, no comments about “bluey”?

    b’shalom

    bananabrain

  10. Rumbold — on 6th January, 2010 at 11:24 am  

    Hahahaha Bananabrain.

  11. Grogipher — on 6th January, 2010 at 12:14 pm  
  12. Don — on 6th January, 2010 at 12:22 pm  

    I’d heard ‘Dances With Smurfs’.

  13. bananabrain — on 6th January, 2010 at 12:24 pm  

    lol@don. hur hur hur.

    b’shalom

    bananabrain

  14. Sunny — on 6th January, 2010 at 1:58 pm  

    What, you mean the climate change deniers at Spiked didn’t like the film? I’m shocked!

  15. David Jones — on 6th January, 2010 at 1:58 pm  

    And when you’ve finished Guns, Germs and Steel you might grasp that the ‘massacre’ of Native Americans was mainly, in reality, the unintended result of germs; germs to which Europeans had become largely inured by dint of their long and close association with pigs, sheep, goats and cattle.

  16. Mr Diamond — on 6th January, 2010 at 1:59 pm  

    I suppose you haven’t understood the point in Guns, Germs and Steel that the ‘massacre’ of Native Americans was mainly, in reality, the result of germs; germs to which Europeans had become largely inured by dint of their long-term close association with pigs, sheep, goats and cattle.

    By the way I think the PC term these days is ‘First Americans’ and I’m sure you’d want to maintain your PC creds.

  17. Dalbir — on 6th January, 2010 at 3:18 pm  

    what, dalbir, no comments about “bluey”?

    What, as in the victims of ‘whitey’ in Avatar or as in the slang for viagra?

  18. Jai — on 6th January, 2010 at 3:32 pm  

    Sunny,

    I’m reading Guns, Germs & Steel at the moment so that also came to mind (civilisations wiping each out over centuries for whatever reason).

    I have that book too and it’s excellent. I’ve plugged the following on PP before but you should also read “A Splendid Exchange: How Trade Shaped the World” by Dr William J. Bernstein, as it’s packed with eye-opening information (written in an easily-read, often wryly humorous style) and covers a lot of the same historical events discussed in Jared Diamond’s book. It was also shortlisted for “book of the year” awards by the Economist and FT/Goldman Sachs.

    It’s obviously looking at things from a slightly different perspective, but it does focus on the reasons for the rise & fall of global civilisations over the centuries, the connections between them, and the impact this had on the various peoples involved. If you read it in conjunction with “Guns, Germs & Steel” then it’s a great way to get an understanding of the full picture.

    You can actually download the introduction to the book for free from Dr Bernstein’s own website:

    http://www.efficientfrontier.com/files/trade/ASE-Intro.pdf

  19. Jai — on 6th January, 2010 at 3:33 pm  

    Sunny,

    I’m reading Guns, Germs & Steel at the moment so that also came to mind (civilisations wiping each out over centuries for whatever reason).

    I have that book too and it’s excellent. I’ve plugged the following on PP before but you should also read “A Splendid Exchange: How Trade Shaped the World” by Dr William J. Bernstein, as it’s packed with eye-opening information (written in an easily-read, often wryly humorous style) and covers a lot of the same historical events discussed in Jared Diamond’s book. It was also shortlisted for “book of the year” awards by the Economist and FT/Goldman Sachs.

    It’s obviously looking at things from a slightly different perspective, but it does focus on the reasons for the rise & fall of global civilisations over the centuries, the connections between them, and the impact this had on the various peoples involved. If you read it in conjunction with “Guns, Germs & Steel” then it’s a great way to get an understanding of the full picture.

    You can actually download the introduction to the book for free from Dr Bernstein’s own website :

    http://www.efficientfrontier.com/files/trade/ASE-Intro.pdf

  20. John Booth — on 6th January, 2010 at 4:11 pm  

    Surely there’s no better time than now to map the Israel-Palestine conflict onto Avatar? You see, there were these “primitive” people living on the land, except these “advanced” people wanted to take the land and use it for something more productive than what the savage primitives who already lived there had in mind….

  21. Shatterface — on 6th January, 2010 at 5:28 pm  

    If you enjoyed ‘Avatar’ check out Ursula K Le Guin’s novella ‘The Word for World is Forest’ which tackles similar themes – and with a strong feminist subtext for good measure. It is uncharacteristically angry for Le Guin, whom many usually find a little cold and distant for their tastes but it was written during the Vietnam War and is among her most passionate works.

    There was an article in Interzone way back called ‘Apologies to Ishi’ about the impact that Ishi, the last surviving member of his tribe (and the associated guilt felt by the American liberal-left) had had on American SF, particularly West Coast SF associated with anthropology (George R Stewart, Kim Stanley Robinson, etc)

    Le Guin’s parents were the anthropologists Alfred and Theodora Kroeber (that’s what the K stands for): Theodora wrote ‘Ishi in Two Worlds’

  22. Shatterface — on 6th January, 2010 at 5:34 pm  

    Oh, and Jared Diamond’s earlier ‘The Third Chimpanzee’ is excellent too.

  23. Shatterface — on 6th January, 2010 at 5:49 pm  

    ‘What, you mean the climate change deniers at Spiked didn’t like the film? I’m shocked!’

    They didn’t like WALL*E either.

    I mean, what kind of c*nt hates WALL*E?

  24. Laban — on 6th January, 2010 at 5:52 pm  

    GG&S is an excellent book and good on early history e.g. medieval Chinese steel industry about which I knew 0.

    After that, try Pinker’s ‘The Blank Slate’.

  25. douglas clark — on 6th January, 2010 at 6:02 pm  

    Shatterface,

    I would have assumed that not another soul around here would have ever even heard of Interzone, far less citing it ;-)

    An excellent piece of free publicity. David Langford should start a new section in ansible link.

  26. Sunny — on 6th January, 2010 at 6:03 pm  

    I suppose you haven’t understood the point in Guns, Germs and Steel that the ‘massacre’ of Native Americans was mainly, in reality, the result of germs

    Yes I understood the point thanks. But they still massacred the host populations – so the point stands.

  27. Dalbir — on 6th January, 2010 at 6:11 pm  

    I suppose you haven’t understood the point in Guns, Germs and Steel that the ‘massacre’ of Native Americans was mainly, in reality, the result of germs

    Whitey just can’t stop acting innocent! ha ha

  28. Don — on 6th January, 2010 at 6:55 pm  

    Douglas,

    Interzone? I spent my gap year there.

    Also, is Dalbir our pet racist? That’s pretty much all he does and seems to get a pass for it.

  29. Don — on 6th January, 2010 at 6:59 pm  

    Sunny,

    True. But that option was only open because…

    That book really is a page-turner, though, ain’t it?

  30. Mr Diamond — on 6th January, 2010 at 7:09 pm  

    But they still massacred the host populations

    Really? It’s just that, as you mentioned it in the context of Guns, Germs and Steel I – mistakenly it seems – thought the book had something to do with your remark. In you mind at least.

    Of course the indigenous populations – I don’t think I’d call them the ‘host’ populations, sounds far too accommodating = would themselves never have stooped to massacre.

    Is the point of your remark just that Europeans were accidentally and deliberately more successful at killing others?

  31. Dalbir — on 6th January, 2010 at 7:10 pm  

    Also, is Dalbir our pet racist? That’s pretty much all he does and seems to get a pass for it.

    There is a truth to what I’m saying, even if trying to get whitey to engage in serious introspection about the effects of his actions is like pissing in the wind.

    Until they give up their obnoxious attempts to dominate the globe, they will be a source of a lot of its problems.

    Try and keep up.

  32. Don — on 6th January, 2010 at 7:47 pm  

    Try and keep up.

    I think I’m keeping up. You have your truth, and that permits you to call me whitey and tell me my attributes.

    Since we have been discussing GG&S, for how long has whitey been a significant factor in world civilisations? Five hundred years ago and he’s tickling at the edges. Three hundred and he’s on a roll. That’s, what, 5% of the history of civilisation?

    The other 95% must have been a paradise with no whitey to mess it up.

    The current global political balance does not excuse personal rudeness or racial steriotyping. Asshole.

  33. Rumbold — on 6th January, 2010 at 7:56 pm  

    Don:

    Dalbir just resorts to the sort of lazy stereotyping that the BNP and Islam4UK favour. He then mixes it up with reasonable points to try and hide it.

  34. Don — on 6th January, 2010 at 8:09 pm  

    reasonable points

    I must have blinked.

  35. TheIrie — on 6th January, 2010 at 8:13 pm  

    I watched this in America, and was gratified when the audience all cheered when the US commando guy got arrowed. Loved it, but I thought the message was about as subtle as being hit over the head with a hammer. The parallel that came to my mind was Lawrence of Arabia. There is a slightly complicated mixed message of anti-imperialism and “orientalist” thinking.

  36. Mr Diamond — on 6th January, 2010 at 8:14 pm  

    @Dalbir

    for how long has whitey been a significant factor in world civilisations? Five hundred years ago and he’s tickling at the edges

    Those Minoans and Mycenians, Greeks and Roamns mightn’t agree.

    5% of the history of civilisation

    Depends when you start counting. Ur? So about 3/4 of the history of civilisation? Ish. 75%.

    The very interesting thing about GG&S is that – finally – we have an explanation as to why the Near East and Europe took off without having to resort to assertions about race. Such as -ooh – Europeans are wont to massacre.

  37. Dalbir — on 6th January, 2010 at 8:38 pm  

    Europeans are wont to massacre.

    Massacre or totally disempower as clearly visible in the US, Canada and New Zealand amongst other places (Aus).

    You’re just a bunch of excuse making apologists. Don’t expect eveyone to fall for your bullshit.

    Keep living in denial.

    To the Indians out there, you know whitey was actually looking for us when the stumbled on what is now known as the US. Looking at those natives, we seem to have had a lucky escape!

  38. Mr Diamond — on 6th January, 2010 at 9:06 pm  

    Massacre or totally disempower

    The difference being, of course, the difference between the contingent facts of Geography that Diamond explores, that led to the West coming on in leaps and bounds before others; and the race-based nonsense of your insinuation – one shared by Sunny, it seems – that Europeans are somehow more inclined to massacre, rather than having been historically more successful.

    you know whitey was actually looking for us

    Whitey had already found you. Whitey was looking for an alternative route.

  39. Dalbir — on 6th January, 2010 at 10:40 pm  

    rather than having been historically more successful.

    Come on, let’s hear the devil’s definition of success. I’m all ears.

  40. Mr Diamond — on 6th January, 2010 at 11:10 pm  

    More successful at killing people. Both inadvertently and..eh…advertently. Wasn’t that clear from the context?

  41. Dalbir — on 6th January, 2010 at 11:22 pm  

    More successful at killing people. Both inadvertently and..eh…advertently.

    Well, you’ve certainly grasped the essence/nature of western ‘civilisation’.

  42. Shatterface — on 7th January, 2010 at 12:35 am  

    ‘I would have assumed that not another soul around here would have ever even heard of Interzone, far less citing it’

    I can remember when people were still comparing it with New Worlds!

  43. sarah — on 7th January, 2010 at 1:23 am  
  44. douglas clark — on 7th January, 2010 at 2:01 am  

    Don @ 27,

    Interzone? I spent my gap year there.

    Really?

    You never cease to amaze me.

  45. douglas clark — on 7th January, 2010 at 2:12 am  

    Shatterface @ 41,

    I can remember when people were still comparing it with New Worlds!

    Bloody hell! That was the first outlet for the likes of J G Ballard and Moorcock wasn’t it? I think I bought it when I was about twelve….

    You hang around here long enough and you are utterly astonished at the absolute good sense of fellow commentators!

    I am having a deja vú moment. There will be some young whippersnapper along shortly that disagrees….

  46. Random Guy — on 7th January, 2010 at 9:23 am  

    Is it just me who finds to a bit ironic that the company bankrolling Avatar is the Rupert Murdoch-owned 20th Century Fox?

    Thats right folks, the world we live in has butchers and warmongers getting rich over messages of environmentalism and illegal invasion parallels. What a joke.

  47. Jai — on 7th January, 2010 at 11:48 am  

    The very interesting thing about GG&S is that – finally – we have an explanation as to why the Near East and Europe took off without having to resort to assertions about race.

    That’s not what GG&S was necessarily about, although I agree that it demolishes spurious assertions about “race” (it’s very much an anti-racist book). The focus was on the inhabitants of what Professor Diamond termed the Eurasian landmass — meaning the entire east-west-oriented continent from Europe right across to the Pacific.

    The book wasn’t focused on why Europeans or “the West” allegedly came on “in leaps and bounds” before others (they didn’t — not before absolutely everyone else in the world and certainly not where northern Europe was concerned), although the rise of Europe during the past 500 years was certainly discussed; it was about the reasons that the inhabitants of the entire Eurasian landmass repeatedly became more advanced and ultimately more dominant compared to the north-south-orientated American continent or the similarly-orientated African continent.

    And since some classical civilisations have also been mentioned on this thread, here are a few more relevant points:

    1. The Romans weren’t exclusively “white”, especially during the empire’s largest range of expansion. And it’s worth bearing in mind that several of the later Roman emperors weren’t actually of European ancestry at all.

    2. Greece and the Roman Empire were indeed amongst the most advanced civilisations in the world at the time, and they had a huge amount of long-range trade and diplomatic contact with other societies which were at an equal level of development — which included India. It is specifically northern Europe which was far less developed for most of approximately 13,000 years of post-Ice Age human history and has only become advanced during the past 500 years.

    3. Professor Diamond makes it clear that while he believes it was predominantly accidents of geography which resulted in the respective regions’ inhabitants becoming more advanced compared to others during the rise & fall of societies, factors such as local politics also played a major part — such as the extent of centralisation and decentralisation, the size of the population involved, the extent of internal diversity and competition, and (for example) unilateral decisions by centralised governments to discard advanced skills & technologies, exacerbated by the perceived lack of any significant localised competitive threats (eg. China’s abandonment of its long-range oceangoing fleets after the voyages of Zheng He, or Samurai-era Japan’s eventual prohibition of firearms even though they had rapidly developed the best (and the largest number of) firearms in the world).

    As I said earlier, there are a lot of complex issues involved and you would need to read Dr Bernstein’s book I mentioned in #18 in conjunction with GG&S in order to get the full picture (GG&S is also specifically mentioned in the book). For most of recorded human history, there was a belt of civilisations from southern Europe through to India, along with China, and later stretching to Southeast Asia, involving interconnected trade networks, cultural links and political dynamics, which resulted in that specific belt consistently becoming the most advanced on the planet.

    This doesn’t negate the huge progress made by people living in (and originating from) northern Europe during the past 500 years or so, but that region is a relatively new player as far as the long history of the most advanced parts of the world is concerned, and it’s therefore inaccurate to make sweeping references to “the West” or “Europe” (or indeed “whitey”) in the context of this discussion.

  48. Jai — on 7th January, 2010 at 12:17 pm  

    With regards to “Avatar” specifically, yes it was mainly an analogy for various aspects of colonialism, especially the expansion in the American continent, although there were obviously also references to more recent events such as Vietnam etc.

  49. sarah — on 7th January, 2010 at 1:24 pm  

    Sunny- you’ve raised another good point that i didnt think of about the disability part of the story. But like I said I’m just glad to see a mainstream movie that centres on a wheelchair user but is being discussed by the mainstream for everything but that, I see that as a compliment to disability- we’re not stared at with everything else forgotten in Hollywood any more.

  50. Sumita — on 7th January, 2010 at 1:31 pm  

    You forgot to mention the relevance of Hinduism… the characters are all blue… I thought of Lord Krishna and Mahabarat when I initially saw the adverts! :-p

  51. Ravi Naik — on 7th January, 2010 at 1:58 pm  

    You forgot to mention the relevance of Hinduism

    I wonder if it is a coincidence the choice of colour.
    There is a whole article on Avatar and Hinduism in wikipedia.

  52. Jai — on 7th January, 2010 at 2:16 pm  

    I wonder if it is a coincidence the choice of colour.

    Possibly not, considering that James Cameron has explicitly stated that the title of the movie is based on the original meaning in Hinduism (rather than necessarily the more recent “World of Warcraft” interpretation).

  53. Sunny — on 7th January, 2010 at 4:01 pm  

    Oh shit, I didn’t even think of the Hinduism reference but that’s sounds interesting!

  54. Dalbir — on 7th January, 2010 at 4:47 pm  

    Are we talking Avatar as in the manifestation of a deity on earth then?

  55. Jai — on 7th January, 2010 at 6:32 pm  

    Are we talking Avatar as in the manifestation of a deity on earth then?

    Broadly, at least in the sense of a messianic figure from elsewhere who is “born into” an earthly body at some stage, and ends up saving the day for the people he’s living with.

    I can imagine a lot of writers out there annoyed at the portrayal that Jack Sully felt incomplete without his legs and preferred his dream-world for that reason.

    Sully’s disability would obviously be a particularly big deal for him because he was a soldier — and the type who had been heavily involved in armed combat (as opposed to predominantly strategy/planning or some kind of desk job). It would matter even more than usual to someone like that, in the same way that a surgeon, an artist or a basketball player would be affected by the loss of his hands.

  56. Dalbir — on 7th January, 2010 at 7:22 pm  

    Actually, on a sort of related note. Here’s a long shot. If there are any Hindu readers out there who are familiar with the Markandeya Purana and/or whose family worship Chandi/Durga, let me know if you are up for a brief chat to fill me in about the subject.

  57. Shatterface — on 7th January, 2010 at 9:53 pm  

    The disability subplot reminds me strongly of Poul Anderson’s novella ‘Call Me Joe’ which is about a disabled man who finds freedom through remotely operating an artificial body used in terraforming.

    I’ve not read it for a while – IIRC the body is Centaur shaped – but I’m sure the Don and Douglas will be familiar with it.

    As to blueness, yes I’d agree it suggests Hindu mythology.

    Interestingly the godlike Dr Manhatten from ‘Watchmen’ is also blue.

  58. Dalbir — on 7th January, 2010 at 10:53 pm  

    Apparently the blue gods in Hindu mythology represented the original dark skinned inhabitants, who were fighting Aryans??

  59. Desi Expat — on 7th January, 2010 at 11:44 pm  

    Dalbir,

    Krishna and Rama who are depicted as Blue/Black are always identified as coming from the ruling royal dynasties so I doubt if this is anything to do with the ‘original dark skinned inhabitants fighting the Aryans’.

    Regarding Krishna, I understand that according to the story, Vishnu took a black and a white hair and said these would form the basis of his incarnations.. The Black hair for Krishna and the white for his brother Balram. So in the iconography Krishna is always depicted as dark and Balram as light.

  60. Kulvinder — on 8th January, 2010 at 12:09 am  

    I saw it, in 3d, it disappointed in every way.

  61. soru — on 8th January, 2010 at 1:26 am  

    That aside, what I also loved about it was the strong anti-war message.

    I’m not sure that’s actually true. The Naavi start with a problem: humans strip mining their lands.

    They have an excuse provided to them to start a war: the air attack on Hometree.

    They (at the protagonist’s urging) start that war, despite seemingly impossible odds. They win, and the problem goes away.

    This is the same basic plot as Star Wars, 300, Aliens, Braveheart and every other post-1960 US action/war film. It just has to use a bit more care in setting up a plausible justification for the conflict given the bad guys were recognisably future-yanks: 300 didn’t sell so well in Iran. So you need a bit more detail about exactly what was going on in Grand Moff Tarkin’s mind before he blew up Alderaan. In turn, that means the hero has to start off in the Imperial base rather than on a moisture farm.

    If all wars worked with that kind of action-movie plot, then war would basically be good, with incidental sad bits where background characters die.

    In real-world history, I don’t think anyone with a culture resembling the Naavi won anything more than a transient tactical victory against the guys with the guns and steel, although the Maori came pretty close.

    Also, if you continue on the story past where the film ends, Sully totally doomed the Naavi. Previously, the humans were just being space vikings, travelling a long way to get a small amount of portable stuff, maybe killing a few people if they got in the way.

    Sully just demonstrated the possibility of actual colonisation of Pandora…

  62. Dalbir — on 8th January, 2010 at 9:29 am  

    #58

    Have you not heard of the theory of Aryan invasions of North India which pushed down the original inhabitants and set up the wonderful caste system to prevent miscegnation? I thought the system itself was called ‘varna’ meaning colour?

  63. Desi Expat — on 8th January, 2010 at 4:00 pm  

    # 61

    No need to get sarky.. I thought you were referring to the blue/black hued gods, these don’t really have anything to do with the ‘Aryan Invasions’ as far as i can see, as all these personalities are explicitly regarded as being part of the Arya or Noble ones..

    There are various theories about the ‘Aryan Invasions’, however the epics were composed centuries after any ‘invasion’ and refer to events that all took place in the subcontinent, so the idea that the blue coloration represents the dark skinned inhabitants fighting light skinned aryans is way off.

  64. Dalbir — on 8th January, 2010 at 5:32 pm  

    I wasn’t getting sarky.

    Anyway, I have heard some Hindus say that the blue hue may represent the original Dravidians fighting the Aryas. I’m not saying the theory is gospel by the way. I was just relaying what I had heard because it is sort of related to what is being discussed.

  65. Desi Expat — on 8th January, 2010 at 6:41 pm  

    OK, I guess sometimes its hard to judge the tone of comments..

    I’d not ever really heard that theory, and seeing how Krishna and Rama are specifically known as being Arya, don’t really see the coloration as some sort of Aryan vs Dravidian thing.

  66. Aaron — on 9th January, 2010 at 6:14 am  

    It’s only a movie. But if you look at the government of this nation it has always sided with the money and not the people. Look at the American Indian and how this nation took away from them to line the pockets of the rich. If you people really want change you need to make government in these United States smaller. Make polutitions earn there money; we should decide what they will get paid! Not them! Stand up for your country before your under China’s law. They do own us now and when they take over, what! Are you going to just let them! Wake Up!

  67. Ravi Naik — on 11th January, 2010 at 11:10 am  

    I’d not ever really heard that theory, and seeing how Krishna and Rama are specifically known as being Arya, don’t really see the coloration as some sort of Aryan vs Dravidian thing.

    Indeed. You can’t determine an Indian caste by skin colour. Skin colour may tell you whether someone is from the North or South of India, specially if someone is very light-skinned or very dark skinned.

  68. damon — on 22nd January, 2010 at 4:17 pm  

    A bit late, but I just watched Avatar this afternoon, and although I enjoyed it as a cracking good film, I have to say that I tend to go with the more mean spirited review made on the Spiked-online webside pointed out in post #4 by SarahAB.

    But for only eight ringets and a place to escape a hot afternoon outside, it was a nice couple of hours.

  69. halima — on 23rd January, 2010 at 5:50 pm  

    A bit later than late .. I still haven’t seen it, seems there are problems to now show it in some countries due to it’s subversive nature.

    But I did just see District 9 and was blown away – and seen this site is full of Sci Fi people – you must all have seen it last year as the sleeper movie of 2009?

    Why were the reviews so lukewarm as though it wasn’t all that, I thought it was BRILLIANT? Aliens as refugees in Jo’Burg and private security firms wanting to look for bio-technology and alien weaponary? Brilliant. All done in satire mode, state of the art technology and a virtuallly unknown cast.

  70. Martin Sullivan — on 8th February, 2010 at 5:12 pm  

    We are so effing LUCKY to have the GREAT BRAINS of Hollywood to help us think about political things, aren’t we?

    So many people were turned off hunting by BAMBI !

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