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  • Double standards over Fort Hood attack


    by Sunny
    6th November, 2009 at 8:35 pm    

    This Washington Independent blog post highlights the hypocrisy of the American right. To recap: a deranged lone gunman at a US military base, who happened to be a soldier there and a Muslim, shot several army soldiers and wounded others. Apparently, before he started shooting he shouted ‘Allah Hu Akbar’ (God is great). But there is no proof that he was influenced by al-Qaeda or any other terrorist groups.
    And yet:

    A top Republican congressional recruit said on Friday that the shooting at Ft. Hood, Texas yesterday by a solider allegedly sympathetic to suicide bombers shows that the “enemy is infiltrating our military.”

    “This enemy preys on downtrodden soldiers and teaches them extremism will lift them up,” West said in a statement. “Our soldiers are being brainwashed.”

    And more:

    You might think that that commentary about a deranged lone gunman ought to await the facts, but you’re not going to get a job at Fox News with that attitude. Raw Story catches Fox’s Brian Kilmeade asking a guest, “Do you think it’s time for the military to have special debriefings of Muslim Army officers — anybody enlisted?” And with that, hundreds, if not thousands, of servicemembers with Muslim heritage are slandered.

    Not all right-wingers are that stupid and reactionary in the US, but it comes as no surprise that as soon as a Muslim guy guys goes nuts then all Muslims are placed under suspicion by these people.

    As Spencer Ackerman points out:

    To make a point no one should have to make: earlier this year, a deranged Army sergeant named John Russell opened fire near a combat stress clinic — sound familiar? — at Baghdad’s Camp Liberty and killed five of his fellow soldiers. No one speculated about any religious motivations. No one suggested he was part of an enemy “infiltration,” or suggested that U.S. troops have been “brainwashed.” Everyone understood that Russell was a deranged lunatic, not an advance scout for a conspiracy to subvert the military internally. It’s funny how double standards work.

    Funny, this point also seems to have been missed out by this blog post at Harry’s Place by ‘Lucy Lips’ who seems convinced there is a “religious motivation” to the attack, and by extension also putting all Muslims under suspicion. It’s sad how these minds work. There are several people who have died: that is bad enough. It’s more disgusting these attacks are used by bigots for their own political agenda.


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    Filed in: Islamists,Terrorism






    57 Comments below   |  

    Reactions: Twitter, blogs
    1. earwicga

      RT @pickledpolitics Double standards over Fort Hood attack http://www.pickledpolitics.com/archives/6484


    2. pickles

      New blog post: Double standards over Fort Hood attack http://www.pickledpolitics.com/archives/6484


    3. links for 2009-11-07 « Embololalia

      [...] Double standards over Fort Hood attack To make a point no one should have to make: earlier this year, a deranged Army sergeant named John Russell opened fire near a combat stress clinic — sound familiar? — at Baghdad’s Camp Liberty and killed five of his fellow soldiers. No one speculated about any religious motivations. No one suggested he was part of an enemy “infiltration,” or suggested that U.S. troops have been “brainwashed.” Everyone understood that Russell was a deranged lunatic, not an advance scout for a conspiracy to subvert the military internally. It’s funny how double standards work. (tags: islamophobia murder usa military) [...]


    4. C L O S E R » Blog Archive » Closing the week 45 - Featuring Theo van Gogh

      [...] Pickled Politics » Double standards over Fort Hood attack This Washington Independent blog post highlights the hypocrisy of the American right. To recap: a deranged lone gunman at a US military base, who happened to be a soldier there and a Muslim, shot several army soldiers and wounded others. Apparently, before he started shooting he shouted ‘Allah Hu Akbar’ (God is great). But there is no proof that he was influenced by al-Qaeda or any other terrorist groups. [...]


    5. C L O S E R » Blog Archive » Closing the week 46 - Featuring Fort Hood and Nidal Hasan

      [...] Pickled Politics » Double standards over Fort Hood attack To recap: a deranged lone gunman at a US military base, who happened to be a soldier there and a Muslim, shot several army soldiers and wounded others. Apparently, before he started shooting he shouted ‘Allah Hu Akbar’ (God is great). But there is no proof that he was influenced by al-Qaeda or any other terrorist groups. And yet [...] [...]




    1. Naadir Jeewa — on 6th November, 2009 at 8:39 pm  

      Glad to see Spencer Ackerman (aka attackerman) cited on Pickled Politics.

    2. Fojee Punjabi — on 6th November, 2009 at 9:12 pm  

      Couldn’t really agree more with your sentiments, Sunny, but I still think that radicalism needs to be rooted out of the community from whence it came- be that militant Islam or, for example, Zionism, so one can’t take to heart the suspicions aroused concerning the Muslim community when one of its own have committed such an atrocity.

      Sure it was only one man and yes, it’s not entirely pertinent that he’s Muslim, but we must root out such radicals of every stripe if we’re to move closer to consensus.

      The aim, in my humble opinion, of such people as the aforementioned Congressman is to highlight that indeed there are Muslims out there who are hell bent on destroying The West and everything it embodies and that we must be wary that it doesn’t take a majority but rather a miniscule minority to cause such gratuituous harm.

      But perhaps he just needs reminding how many Muslims have been slaughtered in the name of ‘democracy’ by his own kinsman in Iraq and Afghanistan before the kettle calls the pot black…

    3. Badmash — on 6th November, 2009 at 9:37 pm  

      Talking about the incitent and Muslim attitudes, Ruth Gledhill of the Times cites the MCB publication on Muslims and the Armed Forces, publishes yesterday

      “British Muslims tend to take the sophisticated enough stand to support our troops while dissenting from the government’s decision to send those troops to controversial conflicts. ”

      Won’t go down well with pro-war Harry’s Place

      http://www.mcb.org.uk/downloads/RememberingtheBrave_MCB.pdf

    4. Sunny — on 6th November, 2009 at 9:52 pm  

      What do you mean by ‘rooting out’? the guy is now captured.

    5. Fojee Punjabi — on 6th November, 2009 at 10:01 pm  

      By rooting out I mean educating and rehabiliting those who have been brain-washed into thinking that Islam is all about Jihad and fighting the West when really it’s about living a way of life that exhibits submission to the will of Allah and believing in the finality of the prophet Muhammad.

      By the by: do you have a problem with me, Sunny?
      On more than several occassions when I’ve posted comments on your site- given even the most inocuous remark- you appear to reciprocate in an incredibly defensive vein… has somebody got ants in their pants, Dear?

      Wood u wyk a woweepop?

    6. damon — on 6th November, 2009 at 10:44 pm  

      I haven’t read Harry’s Place or or much else yet, but is not much of this a bit early?
      I think it will probably turn out to be how I was hearing about it on radio programmes like ‘BBC five live’ today, that the guy’s religion and background was central to this. As was his job within the military as a psychiatrist and how he was struggling with both the morality of what the US military was doing in Iraq and Afghanistan, and how his family members have said he was bullied and mocked for being a muslim of Arabic origin.
      What are the derogatary words that are commonplace within the US army for the people of Iraq and Afghanistan?

      There are some incredibly offesive terms that soldiers use for just about everything they don’t understand.
      And that includes even things like turbans and the male Salwar kameez.

      I heard that the shooter somtimes wore Islamic Dress.

      It was probably a kind of fragging, but influenced by Columbine.
      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fragging

    7. Boyo — on 6th November, 2009 at 11:06 pm  

      Psychiatrists have form, look at Karadzic.

      The evidence appears to suggest Islam was an influence, just as the far right influenced the shooter at the Unitarian Church.

      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Knoxville_Unitarian_Universalist_church_shooting

      Certain individuals will always go postal. However, there’s no denying ideologies can act as a trigger.

    8. Naadir Jeewa — on 6th November, 2009 at 11:45 pm  

      There’s been another mass shooting just a few hours ago. Was watching Fox News live, and you could just sense they were waiting for word that he was an Arab. Turns out he was a disgruntled employee.

      So, really, please take Ackerman’s advice.

    9. Kulvinder — on 7th November, 2009 at 12:50 am  

      The demented comments have already started on the times website

      josi callaghan wrote:
      good example of why they shoulnt be in the UK armed forces
      November 6, 2009 2:41 PM GMT on community.timesonline.co.uk
      Recommended (221)

      Neocon Smith wrote:
      Poetic justice perhaps?

      The radicalised muslim males want to keep women in their place.

      Our Kimberly is having none of it!!
      November 6, 2009 3:07 PM GMT on
      Recommend? (182)

      Phil H wrote:
      Can’t trust them can you
      November 6, 2009 4:47 PM GMT on community.timesonline.co.uk
      Recommend? (173)

      Rick Raider wrote:
      Brave woman for bringing down this murderous assassin and turncoat. From the reports emerging this was not some random act, as he had become radicalised. I would not be surprised if he was a sleeper.
      November 6, 2009 3:02 PM GMT on community.timesonline.co.uk
      Recommend? (156)

      David Walker wrote:
      This government particularly has gone overboard to encourage integration and thus opened the doors to ‘all’ our services and systems being infiltrated.
      I shudder to think just how many ‘sleepers’ there are in the vital services.
      November 6, 2009 3:58 PM GMT on community.timesonline.co.uk
      Recommend? (140)

      A Smith wrote:
      Um Carmen Tan, did you read the article?? CLEARLY the fact he is a Muslim is highly relevant given he reportedly shouted “Allah akbar” – Arabic for “God is great” – as he launched the attack.

      To ignore this would be very naive indeed.
      November 6, 2009 4:06 PM GMT on community.timesonline.co.uk
      Recommend? (123)

      G. Otway wrote:
      Carmen Tan @3.05 PM GMT
      Yes, Anyone could have done this, but the fact is that Hasan is a muslim and he did shout Allah Akbar as he started.
      November 6, 2009 3:36 PM GMT on community.timesonline.co.uk
      Recommend? (121)

      pete M wrote:
      A US Army psychologist, called Nidal Malik Hasan kills 13, seemingly in protest at being sent to Afghanistan. As he did so, he shouted “Allahu akbar”. Seems fairly relevant to point out that he is a Muslim. As a matter of interest, how many non-Muslims are there in the Iragi Army?.
      November 6, 2009 4:57 PM GMT on community.timesonline.co.uk
      Recommend? (110)

      Tony Free wrote:
      Carmen Tan, anyone *could* have done this. But whether they would is another thing. It’s right to focus on him being a Muslim when it was reportedly a religiously motivated killing spree.
      November 6, 2009 3:14 PM GMT on community.timesonline.co.uk
      Recommend? (98)

      What Ever wrote:
      I hope he lives long enough to go to prison where I promise you those boys will take care of business.
      November 6, 2009 3:05 PM GMT on community.timesonline.co.uk
      Recommend? (92)

      I suspect the name Nidal Malik Hasan will become more notorious in america - and britain - than Steven Dale Green. Which if nothing else will give historians an interesting insight into today’s society.

    10. Nick — on 7th November, 2009 at 1:33 am  

      Spencer Ackerman seems to be conflating several points. It’s quite possible to believe that religion may have played a part in motivating Hasan without accepting the wild conspiracy theories about enemy infiltration.

    11. Reza — on 7th November, 2009 at 2:08 am  

      “…a deranged lone gunman at a US military base, who happened to be a soldier there and a Muslim, shot several army soldiers and wounded others. ”

      I wasn’t going to comment on this, but thought I would because given the available evidence:-

      1. This is the first time I’ve ever agreed with anything Sunny has written;

      2. I thought I’d surprise those people who’d expect a confirmed Islamophobe like me to find any excuse to have a pop at Islam, especially with an easy target like this.

      Not this time.

      This just doesn’t look like a planned or coordinated attack by a committed or organized Jihadi.

      Until I know more, I think Sunny’s right. This looks like an act of derangement.

    12. qidniz — on 7th November, 2009 at 8:14 am  

      To keep sundry cans of worms firmly sealed, the Army will find him insane. Padded cell coming up.

      Move along now, nothing to see here.

    13. camilla — on 7th November, 2009 at 11:12 am  

      the only speculation I see here is the speculation about him being offended by his colleagues for his religion or name … hm, I dont actually believe it, seems like an attempt to extenuate his guilt, to share the guilt among him and the others, and not ot offend muslims, as usual

    14. Edwina — on 7th November, 2009 at 12:01 pm  

      SARGE:
      “Goddam it, soldier!
      You ought to see a goddam psychiatrist!”

      BEETLE BAILEY:
      “Not without my flak vest on, Sarge!”

      Ho Ho Ho

      This is the real venom. Ready? I really DO hope so:

      http://frontpagemag.com/2009/11/06/our-brain-dead-country-by-david-horowitz/

      Enjoy it!

    15. Hussein Ameen — on 7th November, 2009 at 3:35 pm  

      In the surveillance tape released he is obviously wearing Shalwar Qameez, a Pakistani dress;

      http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aOeXzamxSk8

      He’s obviously under some sort of Pakistani influence.

    16. chairwoman — on 7th November, 2009 at 4:01 pm  

      Sorry Sunny, but I didn’t get the same impression from Ms Lips as you.

      In fact I felt that Ms Lips sentiments were not dissimilar to your own.

    17. Abdul Abulbul Emir — on 7th November, 2009 at 4:35 pm  

      It’s more disgusting these attacks are used by bigots for their own political agenda.

      Mr Sunny.

      When Mrs A read these words she blew her Burkha I can tell you.

      For crying out loud what is this Sunny Jim person rattling on about now? she wailed.

      Of course bigots on both sides will now use this opportunity which is the reason these attacks happened in the first place.

      Where did Sunny Jimbob grow up for Allah’s sake. It is the way of the world. Can he not see this. ?

      Fortunately my earbashing was interrupted by yet another customer coming in for his Daily Mail.

      But we’d long sold out…..

    18. Chris Baldwin — on 7th November, 2009 at 6:31 pm  

      I’ll never understand why intelligent people still fall into the trap of immediately jumping to conclusions about events like this. We all know from experience that it takes time to get a clear picture of what happened and that initial reports are often wrong. In a few weeks we’ll probably be able to comment on this case, but at this stage anyone who does is liable to make an idiot of himself.

    19. bernard — on 7th November, 2009 at 6:41 pm  

      These twats who think all Muslims are suspects, Islam is incompatible with democracy etc.

      Are these not the same twats who talked bollocks about “liberating” Iraq and, if they have anything to do with it, Iran? Why did they claim to support the Iranian opposition when, according to their ideology, Iran can never become a democracy because most of its people are Muslim, and the same goes for Iraq, Afghanistan and Pakistan? Do they refuse the Pakistani army’s support against the Taliban?

      Fuck me, the intellectual giants on the right have done it again. If you hate every last Muslim so much why bother with nation-building in their countries?

      My theory is this. He was just a nutter whose mental problems should have been picked up on long ago. Simply because of the mental problems he has long been known to have, he shouldn’t have been allowed to operate in the army. But the US Army is so overstretched with imperial wars that it will let anyone, including convicted felons, into its ranks.

      This shows the shame of a policy that lets any old fucker into the army. Let him be locked up for the rest of his puny life and let the army recruit fewer people, doing less around the world, and only if they’re suitable

    20. Yossarian (The Spittoon) — on 7th November, 2009 at 10:31 pm  

      Sunny, whilst it’s obviously far too early to state anything categorically, there does appear to be evidence to suggest that Major Hasan had been exposed to al-Qaeda style extremism.

      I have a post on this here. It seems that Major Hasan had attended the mosque led by Anwar al-Awlaki.

    21. S — on 8th November, 2009 at 12:25 am  

      This is a strange discussion- I agree that you should not jump to a conclusion without all facts, as you say sometimes people go ‘postal’ with little reason. Yet provisionally a religious motive was always pretty likely surely?

      I don’t think there is much offensive in jumping the gun on motive- it’s offensive if you then use it to whip up fear or demonise all muslims. I think you are getting the two things confused.

      In any case (fwiw) testimony from a muslim colleague at Fort Hood now convinces me that religious/political objections certainly played a role:

      http://www.huffingtonpost.com/kamran-pasha/a-muslim-soldiers-view-fr_b_348973.html

    22. MaidMarian — on 8th November, 2009 at 12:40 am  

      bernard - It is not really a question of democracy and Islam being incompatible. Dome may try to dumb it down to that, but the reality is far more complex. For example, India has a (more or less) functioning democracy with a massive Muslim population.

      For all the internet froth, Muslims have happily integrated into democratic Europe and the US, whilst Muslims have had trouble with China’s bizarre autocracy.

      What sustains democracy, to my mind is civil society. Now you could tell me that radical Islam (as opposed to just Islam) inhibits civil society, but surely that applies to any faith-religion. I include environmentalism in that.

      If one were to go to Bosnia, there is a functioning civil society, albeit stunted by communism. Bosnia can, more or less sustain democracy. Iraq might have been able to sustain a democracy as baathist society did allow a loose civil society as the regime was hardly pure Islam. Foolish US interventions allowed terrorists to pile in and restrict civil society - but that’s another story. Afghan civil society? forget it.

      Israel can sustain a million plus Muslims as it has a civil society.

      The paradox here is that civil society allows religion, but the most absolutist forms of religion corrode civil society. There is, clearly, no contradiction between multiculturalism and integration. Indeed, you could argue that an over-indulgence of some immigrant cultures distorts civil society.

      So - to my mind the solution is simple, small government and a culture of water-off-a-duck’s-back. Government can not and and should not preference any religion and publics should not be professional offence takers and should be free to tell religions and others to sod off.

      Simple as that.

    23. MaidMarian — on 8th November, 2009 at 12:47 am  

      Abdul Abulbul Emir - Can you please hold a copy of the Mail for me?

      I’d like to hit your wife over the head with it so I can see the power of metaphor.

    24. Reza — on 8th November, 2009 at 1:22 am  

      barnard

      “These twats who think all Muslims are suspects,…”

      That’s wrong.

      “Islam is incompatible with democracy etc…”

      That’s correct.

    25. Naadir Jeewa — on 8th November, 2009 at 5:43 am  

      I think this statement by @attackerman / Spencer Ackerman is probably applies to some of the discourse going round here too:

      “Instead, what I do know is that if someone decided to say there was something inherently bigoted about Christianity from the fact of such a disgusting occurrence, I would say that the utterance reflected more on the person issuing it than anything else. It is not my job to “protect Islam.” It is my job to adjudicate between what is valid and what is base; and between what is intelligent and what is extremely motherfucking stupid, venal and, yes, bigoted.

      These fucking debater’s points, I tell you. I put up a plea earlier today for people to stop their euphemism. At least have the courage to say why you think Islam is so noxious. Instead, we get what we always get: anti-anti-racism. Somehow it all goes back to how comfortable the privileged wish to continue being. I don’t typically let hate mail bother me, but — God, this day. This is what people take away from a tragedy like Ft. Hood.”

    26. damon — on 8th November, 2009 at 9:29 am  

      I agree that anyone casting aspertions on all muslims is way of of line. How many have done that so blatantly? (Apart from the hatemongers I mean).

      But at the same time, I think a person’s cultural background is a factor to at least bear in mind when you are sending people to fight in wars.
      The British did so in Northen Ireland, where they would wonder if a Northen Ireland catholic soldier might have divided loyalties. Of course there weren’t many, but I remember of one getting killed by the IRA when he was on leave at home in Derry.

      When you have an army behaving as inhumanely as the United States has behaved in Iraq, people who share some cultural affinity with the people being killed by your own army may feel more strongly about it than someone who is not.

      Someone who walks around like the psychiatrist killer did (as was shown in the film of him in the grocery store) wearing islamic dress, will probably have some feeling about the Ummah, and may well have found the tactics used in Iraq to crush uprisings that occured in 1994 as barbaric. I did, and I’m not even a muslim.

      I thought this youtube of (right wing) Bill O’Reilly was interesting, and he has a point at the beginning of it.
      The left and right are pointing fingers at each other.
      http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XeVTtQKXNVs

    27. MaidMarian — on 8th November, 2009 at 11:20 am  

      damon (29) - ‘When you have an army behaving as inhumanely as the United States has behaved in Iraq, people who share some cultural affinity with the people being killed by your own army may feel more strongly about it than someone who is not.’

      Please! Spare me that - Even if the war on Islam existed anywhere outside of talkboard rhetoric, muslims kill muslims just as much as christians can kill christians.

      In my short life I have been bombed four times by the Irish and twice by the muslims and I did not at any point feel like hitting the streets of Belfast or Jeddah because of it.

    28. Raymond Terrific — on 8th November, 2009 at 2:46 pm  

      Any one shouting ‘God is Great!’ before shooting several people dead has been fucked in the head by religion. Islam does attract a fair few of these retards.

      Darwin should have had a ghost writer to dumb it down so that even the idiots of the world who keep spoiling it for the rest of us with their all-seeing men in the sky, can get it.

    29. David Jones — on 8th November, 2009 at 3:44 pm  

      Yup, nothing to do with religion at all, obviously, and anyone saying otherwise is a bigot and a hate-monger…as opposed to the murderer who’s merely misunderstood and probably suffering from the hitherto unobserved condition of Pre-Traumatic Stress Disorder.

      And Islam is perfectly consistent with democracy - just look around the world for proof.

      And any other lunatic going postal who has some passing familiarity with Christianity is clearly in exactly the same relationship to his equally dangerous religion as Nidal Hasan is to Islam.

    30. damon — on 8th November, 2009 at 4:06 pm  

      MaidMarian, I just mean that I have seen with my own eyes, on demonstrations in London against the war in Iraq and against Israel’s bombing of Lebanon, that Muslim Brits are there in numbers greater than you would expect if religious and cultural affinity was not a factor.
      And on an Anti-Apartheid march I remember being on years ago, there were few people who were obviously muslim on it, but people of African origin were there in large numbers.

      And I’d love to know the motivation and hear some explainations from those wicked people (who probably still consider themselves to be Muslims) who have bombed markets and crowded places in Iraq in an effort to stoke up civil war.

    31. Reza — on 8th November, 2009 at 5:37 pm  

      damon

      “When you have an army behaving as inhumanely as the United States has behaved in Iraq, people who share some cultural affinity with the people being killed by your own army may feel more strongly about it than someone who is not.”

      What an astonishing thing to say.

      War is always inhumane. However, ‘our side’ (don’t forget Damon, we ARE talking about OUR side) are behaving far more humanely than the OTHER side. We’re not deliberately TARGETING non-combatants and deliberately blowing up shoppers in markets. We’re not kidnapping and beheading people.

      What the sundry lefties and home-grown Islamists either ignore or pretend isn’t the case is that far, far more Iraqis and Afghans are being killed by Iraqis and Afghans (ie other Muslims) than by us.

      And what do you mean by “cultural affinity”? Are you talking about that “affinity” being with the Islamist kidnappers, beheaders and suicide bombers? Is the “affinity” with those Islamists that reject democracy and will fight to establish Islamic theocracy and sharia law?

      Or is the “affinity” with those Iraqis and Afghans that want us to help them establish democracy?

      However, if a soldier has a “cultural affinity” with the democracy supporting Muslims of those countries, then they should jump at the chance to help establish democracy.

      But if that “cultural affinity” leads to supporting the anti-democratic Islamist elements, then that soldier is an undesirable and a traitor.

      He or she should be jailed for treason.

      I don’t support the objectives of either the Iraq or Afghanistan wars as I think it is unrealistic to imagine that a Muslim majority society can ever operate as a liberal democracy. The ideology simply cannot be overcome with force. Give it a couple of centuries and maybe things might change. But in the meantime we must let those societies find their own way, however unpleasant we believe they might be.

    32. George — on 8th November, 2009 at 5:52 pm  

      The USA is a free country up to a point - one cannot imagine the equivalents of Joan Baez or Seeger or Chomsky having lasted long in REALLY oppressive sovieties.

      However, there IS a dark side:

      http://vdare.com/roberts/091105_asia.htm

    33. MaidMarian — on 8th November, 2009 at 6:40 pm  

      Reza (34) - Out of interest, define, ‘democracy.’

    34. bernard — on 8th November, 2009 at 6:42 pm  

      Yes, Reza, you were consistent in your opposition to Iraq. However, the American right is generally even more hawkish than Obama. What I want to know is why they are involved in nation-building in countries whose cultures they despise?

      Surely anyone who hated Islam so much would, in order to be consistent, oppose foreign entanglements and concentrate on controlling the border, deporting anyone who showed Islamist sympathies, and arming America against extrenal threats. Perhaps they could do something like the Gulf War or the strikes on Iraq in the late 90s, but why a full-scale imperial war?

      Why? Because American right-whingers are morons and twats whose ideas are even more hopelessly wrong than yours- at least you’re consistent and wrong, whereas they’re incoherent and wrong.

      That is what I was saying in my post at 20.

    35. cjcjc — on 8th November, 2009 at 7:06 pm  

      Sorry, but…

      http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worldnews/northamerica/usa/6526030/Fort-Hood-gunman-had-told-US-military-colleagues-that-infidels-should-have-their-throats-cut.html

    36. Naadir Jeewa — on 8th November, 2009 at 7:14 pm  

      “After two days of inquiry into the mass shooting at Fort Hood, investigators have tentatively concluded that it was not part of a terrorist plot.”

      http://www.nytimes.com/2009/11/08/us/08investigate.html?_r=1&hp

    37. MaidMarian — on 8th November, 2009 at 7:16 pm  

      cjcjc - That DT article doesn’t really say anything new, but it does raise one very interesting point:

      ‘One Army doctor who knew him said a fear of appearing discriminatory against a Muslim soldier had stopped fellow officers from filing formal complaints.’

      That IS interesting, if not much more than anecdotal wisdom after the fact. There is not a single thing wrong with respecting religious views, but that does not mean that the collective knee has to be bent before every taboo.

      The professional offence takers (religious and otherwise) have much to answer for.

    38. Sunny — on 8th November, 2009 at 8:39 pm  

      Sorry, but…

      sorry but what cjcjc? Why not spell it out?

    39. bernard — on 8th November, 2009 at 8:41 pm  

      For making statements like that he should have been expelled from the army at best and facing investigations into his sympathies at worst.

      But the US army kept him on, why? For all the whinging about “offence takers” and “diversity”, we know the real reason. So overstretched is the US military, thanks to the pointless imperial wars supported by Democrats and Republicans alike, that they are obliged to recruit any old twat. Not only Hasan, but also people who are only just about keeping themselves out of prison for various kinds of violent crime.

      Is it really so surprising that they behave badly in terms of behaviour towards civilians and so on, as the recent torture scandals show?

      Until the US army scales back operations and has a smaller, better qualified force it leaves itself open to attack from within. Short of a mass draft the only option is to withdraw from trying to police the world and turn the whole world into an extension of the west.

    40. qidniz — on 8th November, 2009 at 10:20 pm  

      But the US army kept him on, why? For all the whinging about “offence takers” and “diversity”, we know the real reason. So overstretched is the US military, thanks to the pointless imperial wars supported by Democrats and Republicans alike, that they are obliged to recruit any old twat.

      Wrong. They can get rid of some twats who sign up, but not others.

      It’s known as Political Correctness, and should be quite familiar here in Leftistan.

    41. bernard — on 8th November, 2009 at 10:40 pm  

      Does Ralph Peters support failed attempts to impose democracy on Iraq and turn it into a good little western democracy through US imperialism, aka “Iraqi freedom”?

      Saddam Hussein was a vile and nasty little man. I am not with those who defend him. But it was obviously a mindless policy to act as if overthrowing him would make the west safer (the myth of his WMDs and links to Al-Qaida) or make Iraq a junior version of America.

      Further right-wing bollocks and inconsistency.

    42. Fojee Punjabi — on 8th November, 2009 at 10:42 pm  

      sorry but what cjcjc? Why not spell it out?

      YOU CAN’T HANDLE THE TRUTH!!!!!

    43. bernard — on 8th November, 2009 at 10:47 pm  

      My view of jihadism is that it attracts people who are alienated and predisposed towards being mental. Some of these right-wing blowhards should know what drives jihadists on. Because they always slag this country off for being “decadent” and often whinge that they don’t think we’re worth fighting for (actually THEY’RE not fighting at all, and the poor bastards who take orders are fighting for politicians rather than for any good cause).

      If these right-wing columnists were from the Middle East, they’d probably have blown themselves up long ago. But I suppose the fact that the majority are from wealthy, priviliged backgrounds gives them an outlet for their rage by getting them journalism jobs they would never in a million years get on their own merit.

    44. Fojee Punjabi — on 8th November, 2009 at 10:55 pm  

      Bernard:

      I concur.

      I read somewhere that the average daily income in Afghanistan is $2 but the Taleban offer local fighters $15… when you’ve barely enough to eat as it is you might have to think twice about turning down such an offer… shame bin Laden’s a coward and won’t fight himself.

      The big pu$$y.

    45. Reza — on 8th November, 2009 at 10:55 pm  

      cjcjc

      I read the Telegraph article.

      I don’t doubt Islam’s capability to twist a vulnerable mind; few religious ideologies are filled with such hatred and violence. This guy probably felt that he was doing ‘god’s’ work and looked forward to virgins, waterfalls and non-intoxicating wine in paradise.

      However, my own gut feeling is that he was deranged; in the same way that many deranged people think their god wants them to kill.

      This is unlike the 9/11, 7/7 or Madrid bombings where the perpetrators calmly committed their evil with much planning and forethought. Where they were organized, coached and coordinated by Islamist organizations and supported by Islamic scholars.

      If that had been the case here, then his handlers would have made better use of their ‘asset’ to inflict far more damage to their enemy than a simple shooting spree.

      It is also very important for all ‘Islamo-sceptics’ to understand that the overwhelming majority of Islamic scholars believe that killing your countrymen is un-Islamic. Therefore, the 7/7 and Madrid bombing were almost certainly un-Islamic. However, the question of 9/11 is grey as the victims were not the killers’ countrymen. That boils down to the very subjective definition of ‘innocent’ as Islam forbids killing ‘innocent’ people. (However, like all subjective terms, it is very easy to claim that the targets aren’t innocent. Who is?)

      We must nevertheless understand that many scholars believe that Islam condones and actually demands that Muslims join their ‘oppressed’ brethren and fight the ‘oppressors’ in OTHER lands. So for example, there is nothing un-Islamic about British or American Muslims, going to Iraq or Afghanistan and fighting their former countrymen. Indeed, many scholars consider this to be a duty.

      It is important to understand these subtleties. I know from experience that Muslim scholars are very slippery. They will stress how un-Islamic killing sprees such as this are, yet they’ll play-down the Muslim duty to leave one’s homeland in order to fight it.

    46. douglasclark — on 8th November, 2009 at 6:17 pm  

      Thanks Sunny, you appear to have taken your own web site back. These folk were adolescent shites…..

    47. damon — on 9th November, 2009 at 2:21 am  

      Reza @ 35 I think you’re talking rubbish there.

      I think you need to read the Independent’s Patrick Cockbun on Iraq.
      http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=purKFMhCNDA&feature=PlayList&p=9D13075DCBFBF7B1&playnext=1&playnext_from=PL&index=11

    48. cjcjc — on 9th November, 2009 at 12:44 am  

      Sorry, but it looks as though there was, at least in part, a “religious” motivation.
      And as for the warning signs:
      “One Army doctor who knew him said a fear of appearing discriminatory against a Muslim soldier had stopped fellow officers from filing formal complaints.”

    49. Soso — on 9th November, 2009 at 10:12 am  

      Let,s see here. Hasan was dressed in Islamic clothing, skull-cap and shouted “god is great” in Arabic as he murdered He has used his mililtary position for da`wa several times in the past and was reprimanded for doing so. He has launched into hate-filled tirades on several occasins about the eternal damnation non-Muslims face. He is known to have been trying to contact Al Qaida for at least 2 years. He attended the same mosque and had the same 'spiritual' advisor as 2 of the 911 highjackers. He was at that mosque as recently as May of this year for his mother,s funeral. He was BORN and raised in America but gave his nationality as Palestinian. In the days before attacking he handed out free korans and gave away his belongings suggesting that the entire episode was a pre-meditated act of jihad.finally Mr Hasan did not “Snap” because of stress because even though he was on the cuss of middle age ( 39 years old), he had yet to see a even a single say of combat.

      But like Obama says; “we can never really know what motivated Mr Hasan”.

      What ever happened to “yes we can”?

    50. falcao — on 10th November, 2009 at 11:42 am  

      The entire hype and islamaphobia machine swings into action when ever a person commits a crime like this. Last few months have seen a string of massacres and shootings in the states do people start blaming the capitalist system because the former employee cursed the day he gambled on the stock market or do they pin the blame on Christian upbringing no they don't but hey its ok to be hypocrites and say its muslim religions fault!

    51. marvin — on 10th November, 2009 at 12:12 pm  

      He was in contact with an 'al-qaeda linked imam' around 10-20 times it has emerged.

    52. camilla — on 11th November, 2009 at 9:26 pm  

      yeah, entire islamophobia machine also swings into action when someone admires al-qaeda and gets an approval from muslim hate-preacher…

      poor muslims, indeed! there is nothing they can do without being accused of something bad

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