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    Who was al-Zarqawi?


    by Leon on 4th July, 2006 at 5:42 pm    

    Two news items have caught my eye today about Abu Musab al-Zarqawi, former Al Qaeda ‘leader’ in Iraq.

    In a wide-ranging interview with the BBC on US Independence Day, Mr Khalilzad said the death of Zarqawi - the then leader of al-Qaeda in Iraq - had encouraged “other insurgent groups to reach out, because some were intimidated by Zarqawi. We want to know the [insurgent] groups that are reaching out - who they are, what capabilities they have, what areas they control.

    But on the other hand, in terms of the level of violence, it has not had any impact at this point. As you know, the level of violence is still quite high,” he said. [BBC News]

    So, the killing of al-Zarqawi has made little difference on ground in Iraq. Big surprise. But his life and death get more mysterious when you add the following to the puzzle:

    Al-Qaida leaders sold out Abu Musab al-Zarqawi to the United States in exchange for a promise to let up in the search for Osama bin Laden, the slain militant’s wife claimed in an interview with an Italian newspaper.

    The woman, identified by La Repubblica as al-Zarqawi’s first wife, said al-Qaida’s top leadership reached a deal with U.S. intelligence because al-Zarqawi had become too powerful. She claimed Sunni tribes and Jordanian secret services mediated the deal.

    “My husband has been sold to the Americans,” the woman said in an interview published Sunday. “He had become too powerful, too troublesome.” [Yahoo News]

    Further down the pieces comes another twist to the tale:

    On Monday, an Iraqi legislator said authorities found telephone numbers of senior officials in al-Zarqawi’s cell phone after his death. Waiel Abdul-Latif, a member of former Prime Minister Ayad Allawi’s party, did not give names of the officials. But he said they included ministry employees and members of parliament.

    Just who was al-Zarqawi? Who was he really working for? And why was he really killed? Inquiring minds want to know…



    Print this page and comments   |     |   Add to del.icio.us   |   Share on Facebook   |   Filed in: Religion, United States, Middle East




    20 Comments below   |  

    1. Kismet Hardy — on 4th July, 2006 at 5:59 pm  

      You know all this ‘intelligence’ the US recieve? Intelligence about the leader of Al-Qaeda, intelligence about bomb makers in Forest Gate, intelligence about hundreds of sleeper cells operating all over the world blah blah blah

      Well, you know all these people the US government are torturing all around the world?

      Wonder what they’d say to stop a pair of pliers ripping out their other thumb?

      Al-Zarqawi was the baddest man in Al-Aqeda.

      Says who again?

    2. jonz — on 4th July, 2006 at 7:43 pm  

      You know all this ‘intelligence’ the US recieve? Intelligence about the leader of Al-Qaeda, intelligence about bomb makers in Forest Gate, intelligence about hundreds of sleeper cells operating all over the world blah blah blah

      Lack of intelligence is due to tacit support for Islamic terror within Muslim communties. We’ve all seen the figures lately.

      What the fuck does Forest Gate have to do with Al-Zarqawi?

      Well, you know all these people the US government are torturing all around the world?

      Evidence? How many? There’s a about 6 billion on the planet?

    3. jonz — on 4th July, 2006 at 7:47 pm  

      What’s more annoying than: being annoyed, posting a comment, and the comment coming out all wrong?

    4. jonz — on 4th July, 2006 at 7:52 pm  

      Who was he really working for? And why was he really killed? Inquiring minds want to know…

      Typical conspiracy theories from the lefties and the Muslims!

      He was working for……… The JEWS! But I’m sure you knew that anyway….

    5. Sid — on 4th July, 2006 at 8:01 pm  

      ypical conspiracy theories from the lefties and the Muslims!

      The typical reponse from the Right-wingers and the Pro-War Non-Stoppers was that he was a Jordanian agent. And because that made him a “bad foreigner”, the Coalition forces were justified to be there because they were “good foreigners” aiming to rid Iraq of this evil for the benefit of Iraqis.

    6. Don — on 4th July, 2006 at 8:18 pm  

      He was killed because they could. And why not?

      As for who dropped a dime on him, I doubt we’ll ever know which specific snake in that snake-pit decided it was time for his Nicky Santoro moment;

      http://www.americanphoto.co.jp/photosearch/Previews/CIN90255_034.jpg

      But that scarcely matters. One evil bastard fewer in the world. It ain’t much, but it brightened my day.

      J0nz, you know I generally have little time for conspiracy theories, but I suspect that in al-Zarqawi’s chosen field conspiracy is the rule rather than the exception and that the move from Prince of whatever to expendable inconvenience is just a nod and a wink away.

      Unless you suspect that someone is gearing up for a CIA/Mossad false flag theory, which would of course be drivel.

    7. Ravi4 — on 4th July, 2006 at 10:19 pm  

      Don - completely agree with you. Zarqawi was no doubt killed by a conspiracy of some kind, most probably involving his fellow heroic head-chopping civilian-incinerating “resistance”. But implying that he was part of some US/Israeli black operation to blow up and kill US (and Iraqi) soldiers & civilians in order to somehow further the US-Israeli neocon cause? This is getting into the realms of those 7/7 & 9/11 deniers that Sunny so wisely cussed out and then banned on a different thread. Apart from anything else, Iraq has surely given us enough proof of US incompetence to show that they simply don’t have the ability to carry out such a fiendishly complex conspiracy.

    8. jonz — on 4th July, 2006 at 10:28 pm  

      Apparently he was framed

    9. El Cid — on 4th July, 2006 at 10:47 pm  

      Well of course, as I constantly hear, the United States needed to invent a really bad baddy…..
      Question is, does this phenomena work both ways?

    10. Kismet Hardy — on 4th July, 2006 at 10:48 pm  

      ‘Evidence? How many? There’s a about 6 billion on the planet?’

      Oh I dunno Jonz. Type in CIA and torture on that pro-islamic anti-zionist website and it kinda tells you stuff i can’t be arsed to relay pretending I knew all along and didn’t just get off a website

      I just know what sounds like it sucks and I say it

    11. Kismet Hardy — on 4th July, 2006 at 10:49 pm  

      Bollocks! I’ve caught your disease

      ro-islamic anti-zionist website GOOGLE and it kinda tell you

      Fuck it back to the crack pipe

    12. Sid — on 4th July, 2006 at 11:50 pm  

      Apart from anything else, Iraq has surely given us enough proof of US incompetence to show that they simply don’t have the ability to carry out such a fiendishly complex conspiracy.

      nicely observed.

    13. soru — on 5th July, 2006 at 11:10 am  

      Of course, most likely is that, while mostly just working for his own reasons, he was given some help by some combination of the 20 or more governments or governments-in-exile that wouldn’t want to see a US-friendly government in Iraq.

      But, if you were going to make up a conspiracy theory, the one that would make internal sense is a group within the US government _opposed_ to the occupation.

      Something like:
      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yellowcake_forgery

      He became more forthcoming in subsequent months, eventually saying that a small group of disgruntled retired C.I.A. clandestine operators had banded together in the late summer of last year and drafted the fraudulent documents themselves.
      “The agency guys were so pissed at Cheney,” the former officer said. “They said, ‘O.K, we’re going to put the bite on these guys.’”

      But the lure of all conspiracy theories is the same. If you want to believe such a group exists, it is easy to make up a story about how they would cover their tracks, which then serves to explain any and all evidence that might show the group doesn’t exist.

    14. Roger — on 5th July, 2006 at 12:26 pm  

      It seems perfectly reasonable that someone on his own side who thought Zarqawi’s tactics and strategy were wrong or didn’t work told where he was. IRA members were in the habit of killing their internal enemies at one time. Later they found it much more effective to tell the British army where they were- martyrs and heroes are much better at recruiting than people who are shot by their supposed friends in a terminal disagreement over policy and tactics.

    15. xyz — on 6th July, 2006 at 11:38 am  

      I find this hilarious.

      Al-Zarquawi was a butcher and a murderer. For all those people that claimed there was no Al-Quaeda in Iraq, where did they appear from? These scum were always around the region and I say the USA did good in sending this butcher to hell.

      What has Forest Gate and the other incident got to do with this? What about the countless other plots that have been foiled? What about the Ricine plot which was conceived in the UK before 9/11? Are you going to tell me the invasion of Iraq caused that? Well if you are the timelines don’t measure up.

      I’m a left winger but I dion’t see America or our Government as the enemy…………..I see fundamentalists (in whatever guise) as the enemies. One only has to look at what the Taliban (Al-Quaeeda) regime did in Afghanistan when they imposed a medieval culture in the 20th Centtury on the people.

      In anycase, what about Blairs and Clintons Crusade to save Muslims in Bosnia> That was an illegal war yet I didn’t see any of my fellow left wingers criticise that. For that matter i didn’t see any Muslim criticise that?

      I smell the foul stench of hypocrasy from some of the people here…..given the choise of living under a Western Democracy or an Islamic Regime….I chose the West everytime.

    16. Don — on 6th July, 2006 at 2:21 pm  

      xyz

      Who are you talking to?

    17. Antichrist — on 6th July, 2006 at 2:25 pm  

      ha ha and there aren’t any fundamentalists of course.

      invite trouble and trouble will always come.

    18. Antichrist — on 6th July, 2006 at 2:26 pm  

      in America or Our Government

    19. roxette — on 6th July, 2006 at 10:36 pm  

      I assume al-Zaq was just who he appeared to be but the Jordan bombings were a step too far even for the Jordanians.

      He realised that when he apologised afterwards. My bet is the Jordanian secret service tracked him down and despatched him.

      Now hands up all those who think Anjem Choudhary is a double agent for MI5?

    20. soru — on 6th July, 2006 at 11:11 pm  

      My money’s on yvonne ridley.

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