Zahid Mubarek enquiry report


by Sunny
29th June, 2006 at 2:51 pm    

A public inquiry today castigated the prison service for “a bewildering catalogue” of failings that led to the murder of Asian prisoner Zahid Mubarek by his white racist cellmate.

High court judge Mr Justice Keith, the inquiry chairman, outlined 186 individual and “systemic” failures that gave racist psychopath Robert Stewart the opportunity to bludgeon his teenage cellmate to death in March 2000 at Feltham young offenders’ institution.

The report detailed how a letter from Stewart which referred to “niggers” and “Pakis” was discovered by staff but insufficient action was taken because of the “unacceptably relaxed view taken of racist language which the culture at Feltham had bred”.

His record of violence included his involvement in the killing of 18-year-old Alan Averill at another prison. [the Guardian]

Official website of the enquiry. On the killer Robert Stewart: some background, and interview with family.


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Filed in: EDL,Race politics






3 Comments below   |  

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  1. Indigo Jo Blogs

    Zahid died in jailers’ game…

    The report on the murder of Zahid Mubarek, the Asian youth jailed for “going equipped” and murdered in his cell in Feltham young offenders’ institution in March 2000, has just been issued, and a press conference can be seen at that page (see this ea…




  1. Vikrant — on 29th June, 2006 at 3:41 pm  

    Hell given the amount of racism in Feltham itself… i dont doubt that jail staff may have been racist.

  2. Arif — on 29th June, 2006 at 4:39 pm  

    Seems like a very rigorous piece of work. Main criticism I can level is that, given they are aware that their call for single cells for prisoners is very ambitious, and although they are aware that prisoners cannot openly say why they want to move cells for fear that the information would get back to their cell-mate, they do not make a stronger case for requests to be taken much more seriously. It seems to imply the refusal was regrettable, but probably justifiable given the paperwork and hassle involved. On this point I think they could have had more empathy for prisoners fearing for their lives than staff wanting to manage their workload.

    Otherwise a lot of good stuff. I worry that is aspirational enough to be ignored, though and opening up big issues like treatment of personality disorder without being very clear on a bottom line – maybe they should have recommended another report to deal with that (assuming that reports do get acted upon….)

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