Birmingham race-riot murder


by Al-Hack
22nd May, 2006 at 4:30 pm    

Waqar Ahmed, 26, Azhil Khan, 23, and Afzal Khan, 22, all from Handsworth in Birmingham, were today convicted for life for the racist murder of Isaiah Young-Sam during the Birmingham race riots last year.

They will each serve a minimum of 25 years in jail, the judge announced today. Isaiah was racially abused. The three tried to escape to Dubai but were caught there. Good riddance to racist scum.

Related article on inter-ethnic conflict, hat tip: Jay


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Filed in: EDL,Race politics






39 Comments below   |  

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  1. Jay Singh — on 22nd May, 2006 at 4:34 pm  

    Good result.

    More on the aftermath and current situation in Lozells.

    http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/uk/4989202.stm

  2. Sunny — on 22nd May, 2006 at 4:48 pm  

    I was about to post this too.
    Nice one Jay, have added your link.

  3. Sid — on 22nd May, 2006 at 5:55 pm  

    I love it when justice gets served.

  4. gaz — on 22nd May, 2006 at 5:59 pm  

    It is a shame they were not given a natural life tariff.

  5. raz — on 22nd May, 2006 at 6:53 pm  

    Twats. What a sickening crime. They are lucky they live in the UK and not Pakistan otherwise they would be on appointment with the hangman.

  6. Bikhair — on 22nd May, 2006 at 8:55 pm  

    You know this same issue come up during the riots of Los Angeles. WHile it was sparked by the verdict of the Rodney King Trail, it also opened up a smeltering issue between Korean business owners and the black community. Many of the businesses targetted were Korean owened. Black owned businesses started putting up signs in the window saying that they were black owned so they wouldnt be targetted. The incident of a black teenaged girl being shot by a Korean store owner didnt help matters much. All this happened in Los Angeles where you have most, the vast majority, of the liquor stores, beauty supply stores, dry cleaners, fast food, nail shops, and swapmeets owned by Koreans and other East Asians.

    As an aside my man happens to work on a very interesting block in the hood in LA. His job is owned by an Arab, the pawn shop next door to him is owned by a Jewish guy, the Motel on the other side of him is owned by Hindus, the resturant across the street by Belizians, and the Auto repair by an East Asian. There is this one Phillipino lady who everyone calls Mom, that owns the doughnut store not too far from him. Its a crazy place.

    I heard something a long time ago about California: Its like a granola bar, once you take out of flakes all youre left with is the fruits and the nuts. Ha Ha Ha…

  7. RISc — on 22nd May, 2006 at 10:56 pm  

    I have a feeling the second photo (Azhil Khan) is not allowed to be published.

  8. al — on 23rd May, 2006 at 1:47 am  

    Lets not mention the violence was actually started by the afro-caribbeans, who are yet to be arrested for vandalism. Those masked men with baseball bats are free roaming the streets with their prejudices. How many of them got arrested. And, another thing, every time it’s mentioned on news report, it’s always a moaner about the shops being owned by asians – what do you want , the govt to give u shops – now c’mon, that’s just positive discrimination too far.

  9. Ismaeel — on 23rd May, 2006 at 8:01 am  

    Has anyone else heard that this was nothing to do with racial tensions but was actually a turf war between black and asian gangs? That’s what i’ve heard from a very reliable source, though i admit i may be completley wrong, just wondered if anyone else had heard that.

  10. mirax — on 23rd May, 2006 at 8:37 am  

    It is the needless death of Isaiah Young-sam that is under discussion. To my mind, the last two posts seem to want to divert attention from that fact.

  11. sonia — on 23rd May, 2006 at 11:16 am  

    i dont think i like al-hack’s writing much at all – the tone is too similar to publications like..jing jing..the daily mail, or the sun.

    “racist scum”

  12. sonia — on 23rd May, 2006 at 11:17 am  

    comment got cut in two..

    “racist scum” sounds too similar in attitude to “foreign scum”. oh so you’re on different sides on the coin – but the sentiments appear to be the same!

  13. Tilling — on 23rd May, 2006 at 11:28 am  

    I’m sure al-Hack would like to apologise unreservedly to members of the racist murderer community he may have offended by describing these racist murderers as ‘scum’.

    Sheesh!

  14. Jay Singh — on 23rd May, 2006 at 11:30 am  

    Murdering a man in a mob as you chase him down a side street (twelve against one! How brave) does qualify you to be described as scum, I reckon.

  15. Tilling — on 23rd May, 2006 at 11:33 am  

    Exactly, Jay Singh. Some people deserve the soubriquet through their behaviour.

  16. Roger — on 23rd May, 2006 at 11:45 am  

    “forcing African Caribbeans to spend their money with Asian businesses”
    This is from an alleged expert on “community relations”. what would his response be if the “white community” applied the same policy? The nazis encouraged peole to shop at ethnically siotable shops.

    Whatever the motives of the rioters murdering someone is much more serious than standard rioting: one reason the police caught these men and not- allegedly- “the masked men with baseball bats” is because they spent more time and man-power looking for them. If Mr Young-sam hadn’t been murdered they would have had more time and men available to look for the alleged rioters.

  17. Jay Singh — on 23rd May, 2006 at 11:46 am  

    I don’t know if this is the right place to post this link. It is from Clive Davis and is about the tensions between Africans and West Indians in London.

    http://clivedavis.blogs.com/clive/2006/05/black_brown_bei.html

    This reminds of the complexity of racial dynamics in the UK. Not only the racist murder of Isaiah Young-Sam and racism between some Asians and Black Britons. But even amongst Asians, ever since I was a kid, Sikhs and Pakistanis have had tensions too.

  18. Jay Singh — on 23rd May, 2006 at 11:49 am  

    Roger

    You are right. Isaiah Young-Sam was murdered by a racist mob. In answer to al, that is why the other crimes were not investigated or have not received so much attention.

  19. raz — on 23rd May, 2006 at 11:50 am  

    Generally, Indians and Pakistanis get on pretty well in the UK. I don’t understand why the Sikh/Muslim dynamic seem to cause the most problems. Stupid, really.

  20. Roger — on 23rd May, 2006 at 6:32 pm  

    ” I don’t understand why the Sikh/Muslim dynamic seem to cause the most problems. ”
    I think that’s because sikhism was fairly recently invented. As a result- like the bahais- in the eyes of many muslims it is not even a corruption of a true religion but is entirely inspired by Satan.

  21. Jai — on 23rd May, 2006 at 6:38 pm  

    Roger,

    It’s not just that (which I’m not in a position to comment on), it’s because historically Sikhs very forcefully raised arms against some of the excesses that were being committed in the name of Islam within the Indian subcontinent, both during the Mughal Empire and during the century afterwards. There’s also some bad blood as a result of the mutual bloodshed during Partition in 1947.

  22. Jay Singh — on 23rd May, 2006 at 6:46 pm  

    I think Sikh/Muslim friction in the UK has lots to do with gangs of Punjabi men in their teens fighting over girls and territory and macho posturing than it does with historical reasons like that. I doubt when a Sikh gang and Pakistani gang clash in Slough or Derby it’s over what happened 200 years ago.

    Gautam Malkani’s novel Londonstani (which I am increasingly enjoying) is very good on this specific point.

  23. Jai — on 23rd May, 2006 at 6:57 pm  

    A lot of animosity gets passed down from generation to generation and to some extent becomes embedded in the culture of the groups concerned, so historical events are a cause of this to some extent, but it is correct that there have been some more recent reasons behind what happens.

  24. Roger — on 23rd May, 2006 at 7:15 pm  

    Not a cause but an excuse then? I still think that there is culturally induced hostility or potential hostility before more immediate reasons to hate each other come up.

  25. El Cid — on 23rd May, 2006 at 9:17 pm  

    I must say it’s shame there isn’t more input on PP from Britain’s other main immigrant group, the AfroCaribbean community.
    Like-minded dialogue from that side would help your stated objectives Sunny, methinks — and I don’t mean just input on the Lozells affair and its aftermath.
    I’m not Asian, if non-PP regulars are reading.

  26. funkg — on 24th May, 2006 at 11:19 am  

    there is input on PP from afro-carribeans (including me) its just that i don’t feel the need to refer to my ethnic background that seems a bit too crass and american for my liking, im not an ‘immigrant’ my family have lived in the UK since 52 when my father came to study at uni.
    like i have said on previous postings, individduals committing criminal actsincluding murder, rioting and theft should be prosecuted under the law. any alledged hostility that may occur between certain ethnic groups, is down to the individual. whats it to do with me if an afro-carribean gang in brum has ‘beef’ with an asian gang?

  27. Roger — on 24th May, 2006 at 12:13 pm  

    What did it have to do with Mr Young-Sam “if an afro-carribean gang in brum has ‘beef’ with an asian gang?” That’s leaving aside that a society where the best that many young men can do is identify with gangs and even turn their race, religion or culture into a kind of gang has got something wrong with it.

  28. Sunny — on 24th May, 2006 at 1:41 pm  

    any alledged hostility that may occur between certain ethnic groups, is down to the individual

    exactly. I don’t see the point in making this into a big trend.

  29. El Cid — on 24th May, 2006 at 2:02 pm  

    Going by point 28, it’s clear that I’ve been misunderstood.
    The point funkg makes is a given. I couldn’t agree more if I had a gun to my head.
    I’m glad you’re out there funkg, even if I haven’t seen you before.
    So you don’t consider yourself an immigrant — even in the second or third generation sense? Good. I’m pleased for you. It’s a personal choice and not a big deal. But I do and my family links to the UK stretch further back than 1952.

  30. funkg — on 24th May, 2006 at 4:13 pm  

    thanks sunny and el cid, ok im a third gen immigrant who loves going back ‘home’ when i can but also loves travelling around asia, america and europe and one day africa.

    roger, none of us can be expected to police all of our own communities, there were previous threads which stated that some afro carribeans ‘terrorise’and rob some asian shop keepers can i police these criminals? no! i can and do speak out when i witness antisocial behaviour and have often intervened in situations, but this is more to do with my own sense of community spirit more than anything else. Also as individuals its up to us to set good examples to our families (especially or kids), collegues, clients and society at large. Its dreadful what happened to Mr Youg Sam, a young man in the prime of his life a victim of a criminaly minded, violent and delinquant parts of our society, that has always been existed all well as theft, prostitution and rape.

  31. Jay Singh — on 24th May, 2006 at 4:19 pm  

    Well said funkg

  32. Roger — on 24th May, 2006 at 4:33 pm  

    I agree none of us can be expected to police our own communities- one problem is that it’s assumed that it is only the behaviour of that community we should be concerned with whenwe are all part of the main community in Britain. As I said, I think communal identification of that kind is one of the things wrong with that whole community. The frightening thing about Mr Young-Sam’s killers is that they don’t seem to have been criminally-minded or delinquent except when “their” community was concerned.

  33. truhfull — on 24th May, 2006 at 8:30 pm  

    the 3 guys are innocent i was at the trial no evidence at all police just set them up and im a white jurno

  34. Jay Singh — on 24th May, 2006 at 8:32 pm  

    I don’t think so.

  35. Don — on 24th May, 2006 at 8:39 pm  

    trufull,

    You might want to think about getting a refund from your journalism school. They seem to have skipped spelling, syntax and punctuation.

  36. Jay Singh — on 24th May, 2006 at 8:43 pm  

    The funny thing is his name ‘trufull’ – I think he had probably meant to call himself Truthful

    hahaha, clown

  37. al-Haq — on 28th May, 2006 at 12:49 am  

    Jay u think your so funny. You really should not talk about things that you dont know about, for you were not at the trial, you don’t know the ins and outs of the case, so alls im going to say is instead of being arrogant and accepting everything you hear in the media go do some proper research. More to the point once you have done this what you will find is that the three men accused of murdering Mr Young Sam, based on the FACTS they are innocent, for the pathology report showed that there was no evidence to suggest Mr Young Sam had been attacked by a group of people but rather was killed by a single stab wound to the heart. Moreover a witness appeared in court to confrim the identity of the actual murderer. If thats not enough DNA was also found of another person at the scene, but not of any of the defendants.
    p.s My sympathies are with the family of Mr Young Sam and i hope justice is served by convicting the right person and not by convicting three innocent young men.

  38. Roger — on 28th May, 2006 at 12:02 pm  

    Actually, the trial showed that Mr Young-Sam was attacked by a group of people, but that he was killed by a single blow. However, the men convicted were guilty because they took part in a group attack on him. In law, if you engage in an activity with others you accept and are resposible for the consequences of that activity- in this case, Mr Young-Sam’s death.
    I agree that twenty five years as a tariff seems unjust for those not directly involved in the stabbing. One of the reasons we have Courts of Appeal is so that when the original judge reacted in anger rather than with deliberation the sentence can be amended.

  39. al-Haq — on 29th May, 2006 at 1:59 am  

    Well like i said before the Pathology report showed that the victim sustained one single stab wound to the heart and that there were no other bruises or cuts found besides grazes to one side of his face as a result of the fall. This information has not been covered by the media and only people who attended the trial would be aware of this. But not to worry the ins and outs of the case will be brought to light soon, for injustices like this are never left unchallenged and the truth will have to come out, about the case and the trial.

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