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  • Win two tickets for The Black Album, at National Theatre


    by Sunny
    22nd July, 2009 at 3:28 pm    

    Religion is for the benefit of the masses, not for brain-box types like you. Those simpletons require strict rules for living, otherwise they would still think the earth sits on three fishes. But you mind-wallahs must know it’s a lot of balls.

    An Asian kid from Kent goes to college in London and teams up with a sympathetic group of anti-racists. But it’s 1989, the year of the fatwa, and as Shahid begins a hedonistic affair with his lecturer, his radical Muslim friends want to steer him away from the decadence of the West.

    We’re not blasted Christians. We don’t turn the other buttock. We will fight for our people who are being tortured anywhere – in Palestine, Afghanistan, Kashmir, East End!

    Hanif Kureishi’s witty stage adaptation of his strikingly prescient and acclaimed novel, The Black Album, humorously considers how the events of 1989 have shaped today’s world, where fundamentalism battles liberalism

    The Black Album at NT
    www.tara-arts.com
    —————

    Competition: PP is running a competition with the National Theatre to give away two tickets to see this at the NT.

    To win the two tickets you have say in one line (about 140 characters) the thing you find most amusing about multi-cultural Britain. The best answer wins in the comments or by twitter wins two tickets.

    —————
    Hanif Kureishi’s novels include Something to Tell You, Gabriel’s Gift, Intimacy and the semi-autobiographical The Buddha of Suburbia, which was adapted for television for the BBC. His plays include Sleep With Me and a version of Brecht’s Mother Courage at the National, Birds of Passage (Hampstead), Soaking the Heat and Borderline (Royal Court). His screenplays include My Beautiful Laundrette, The Mother and Venus.

    THE BLACK ALBUM will go on tour following its run at the NT, including visits to: West Yorkshire Playhouse, Leeds (w/c 20 October), Liverpool Playhouse (w/c 27 October), Oxford Playhouse (w/c 10 November), Warwick Arts Centre (w/c 17 November) and Bath Theatre Royal (w/c 23 November). For more details, please visit: www.tara-arts.com

    A co-production between the National Theatre and Tara Arts

    The Black Album
    a new play by Hanif Kureishi
    July 14th – October 7th.
    —————-


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    Filed in: British Identity,Events






    12 Comments below   |  

    Reactions: Twitter, blogs
    1. pickles

      New blog post: Win two tickets for The Black Album, at National Theatre http://www.pickledpolitics.com/archives/5239




    1. Sunny — on 22nd July, 2009 at 3:56 pm  

      Where’s Jai when you need him?

      (doesn’t mean he will win though).

      And people calling me up to get the tix is not allowed! You have to enter the competition via the comments dammit. Or by email.

    2. kismet hardy — on 22nd July, 2009 at 4:26 pm  

      The melting pot always smells exquisite, but sometimes all you want is chips

    3. Jai — on 22nd July, 2009 at 4:31 pm  

      Where’s Jai when you need him?

      (doesn’t mean he will win though).

      Heh heh, very funny ;)

      I’m going to give the tickets a raincheck but I may have a go just for a laugh anyway…..

      Stay tuned……

    4. Yahya Birt — on 22nd July, 2009 at 4:42 pm  

      Multiculturalism is masala pizza washed down with a chai latte.

    5. cjcjc — on 22nd July, 2009 at 5:44 pm  

      I’m going to this tonight.

      Hasn’t had the best reviews.
      Book was enjoyable I recall.

    6. munir — on 22nd July, 2009 at 5:50 pm  

      I wonder why Hanif Kureshi is considered an expert on Islam? He is an athiest brought up in a non-religious (so like Tariq Ali following the religion of his fathers; how rebeliious)who knows nothing of the religion except empty slogans he puts in the mouth of his characters and says he despises Islam. Oh wait his dad is Indian/Pakistani (though leaning towards Buddhism) and he’s got a Muslim name. He’s also something of a racist as he believes you cant be a practising Muslim and be western/English/British.

      Having said that “I am a professional businessman, not a professional Pakistani” is a great line

    7. MaidMarian — on 22nd July, 2009 at 6:05 pm  

      The most amusing thing about multiculturalism is the pretentious theatre it has generated.

      Still want the prize though.

    8. Yahya Birt — on 22nd July, 2009 at 6:18 pm  

      Munir:

      Has Kureishi ever promtoed himself as an Islam pundit? Personally, I don’t think so.

      The book, and hence the play, is a period piece; Kureishi said as much on Radio 4 the other day. 1989 and all that. The Satanic Verses Affair, the fatwa, the emergence of radical Muslim groups on campus. The Fall of the Berlin Wall. The height of trendy postmodernism. Liberalism looking to escape po-mo. Prince playing the background. The virtue of the book was that Kureishi slammed all this together in what was often quite a sharp and witty way.

      My main problem with the book when I read it was that all Muslim male students were to a man, dim-witted. Shahid, the main protagonist, whose mind, body and soul is literally fought over by Liberal and Islamic Fundamentalists, is nice but clueless. For the Muslims, there is only chance of freedom is to get out of Islam altogether, the subtext of the book suggests to me (that’s my personal reading of the book anyway). There are few shadings of Islam in the book, and most of the Muslims are ciphers for Issues (but then the Marxists don’t do too well out of it either) but then the book is a reflection of the fallout from the Rushdie Affair, when things did get horribly polarised.

      So the play should be an interesting trip down memory lane….

    9. Altonrex — on 23rd July, 2009 at 7:38 am  

      I wish I would get a tickets. Love to attend such nice musical events. Thank you for sharing the information about the event tickets.

    10. cjcjc — on 23rd July, 2009 at 11:03 am  

      My main problem with the book when I read it was that all Muslim male students were to a man, dim-witted. Shahid, the main protagonist, whose mind, body and soul is literally fought over by Liberal and Islamic Fundamentalists, is nice but clueless.

      Unsurprisingly that is how they and he come across in the play.

      Mind you I’m not surprised they are fighting over his body - the actor playing Shahid is gorgeous!

      Minor celebrity spot (D-list) - Yasmin A-B was in the row in front.

    11. Kismet Hardy — on 23rd July, 2009 at 11:03 am  

      Munir, Kureishi has every right to talk about his experience as a Muslim in any which way he sees fit. My experience of public school won’t be the same as Boris Johnson’s but that doesn’t mean I don’t have the right to wax pretentious about me. No one owns anything

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