Obama finally takes stance on Honduras coup


by Sunny
30th June, 2009 at 3:18 am    

I was, a couple of days ago, going to write an annoyed blog post condeming Prez. Barack Obama for not saying anything about the military coup against the president of Honduras. It’s the most pressing matter in the world I’m sure you’ll agree. I bet John Pilger was angrily sharpening up a column for the New Statesman calling him an Uncle Tom again. Anyway, Obama has now spoken out and said the coup was illegal. Phew! That saved me from criticising Obama and no doubt killed a few ‘No Change President‘ headlines.


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  1. pickles

    New blog post: Obama finally takes stance on Honduras coup http://www.pickledpolitics.com/archives/4998




  1. Carm — on 30th June, 2009 at 3:29 am  

    YOu clearly do not know what you are talking about, neither does Barack Obama. The millions of Hondurans citizens are victims of that Tyran Manuel Zelaya Rosales. Why do foreigners dont understand that we do NOT want Manuel Zelaya Rosales to come back to Honduras. We are now on track to having a real democracy. We defeated his intentions of changing our constitutions an continuing in power. That would have been so bad considering all the damage he has done to our country in everythoing from economy, criminality rates, healthcare, drugs and his very well known corruption.

  2. Ruben — on 30th June, 2009 at 5:21 am  

    Neither Mr. Obama, nor any other national “leader”, have a right to impose their will on the Honduran people. The U.S. and Europe have done nothing to protect citizens of Venezuela, Ecuador, Bolivia and Cuba from the “comandantes”, other than allow ever growing numbers of their citizens to join the diaspora of the growing dispossessed in those countries. We don’t want our country to suffer the same fate, which is exactly where Mel Zelaya was taking us. He’s a criminal with ambitions of becoming President for life, like all these other tinpot dictators. Please let us, as a nation, decide our own fate!

  3. Shamit — on 30th June, 2009 at 8:02 am  

    The Honduran President violated two orders from the Supreme Court of Honduras — was trying to run a referendum which has been deemed illegal by the Supreme Court.

    The Honduran Congress do not support the President, including his own party in his intention to alter the Constitution of the country.

    By law only the Honduran Congress can call for Referendum and not the President.

    When the Armed Forces refused to carry out the President’s illegal order after the Supreme Court’s verdict – the President fired the Armed Forces Chief who approached the Supreme Court. The Court ordered the President to reinstate the Officer and the President refused.

    So the President was violating the supreme law of the land and the Armed Forces with backing from Congress and Supreme court went and arrested The president. And within a few hours, following the Constitutional process the head of the Congress was sworn in.

    So who started the coup — seems like the President doesn’t it Sunny? And I think while the process was wrong but the President had to go because he flouted the constitution, the Supreme Court and the law of the land. And Obama is backing him.

    What about the rule of law? Or are we supposed to throw that out when lefties are concerned?

  4. Shamit — on 30th June, 2009 at 8:06 am  

    It was not a military coup — it was a coup by the institutions such as Supreme Court, the elected Congress to get rid of a President who had no respect for the Constitution or the laws.

    Or do you support leaders who flout the Constitution and Rule of Law?

  5. Leon — on 30th June, 2009 at 6:45 pm  

    Shamit, I think you’ll find history provides ample reason to be tempted to believe this was a US ‘inspired’ coup…

  6. Shamit — on 1st July, 2009 at 9:17 am  

    Leon

    The cold war has been over for 20 years. And, in this particular instance, the US Government over the past few months have been trying to defuse the situation – by trying to work with all parties and trying to ensure extra-constitutional measures were not taken by any side.

    However, the reluctance of the President of Honduras to obey the Constitution, laws of the land as well as the successive verdicts of the Supreme Court precipitated this crisis.

    Blaming this on the US is not really the way to go. No one supports or likes the idea of extra constituional means as the acceptable process for political transition.

    However, the extra constitutional means were being adopted by the President and in this case, the institutions acted to protect the sanctity of the Constitution and dare I say, democracy in Honduras.

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