Latest
» RT @josephlaking: Spectacular example of how out of touch Boris Johnson is: http://short.to/je1m "chicken feed" FFS 1 hr ago

» There's something very wrong about Goldman Sachs making $2 billion profit only months after a bailout http://bit.ly/hHtsC 2 hrs ago

» Good article by @_NeilRobertson_ - No simple solutions for Afghanistan http://bit.ly/MojAl (and not just coz it mentions me) 2 hrs ago

» Goldman Sachs - The Great American Bubble Machine http://bit.ly/TD5df - a lot of controversy around this one 4 hrs ago

» Could Murdoch’s Love of Gossip Doom His Family? http://bit.ly/1i5DjY #murdochgate 4 hrs ago

More updates...


  • Family

    • Ala Abbas
    • Clairwil
    • Daily Rhino
    • Leon Green
    • Liberal Conspiracy
    • Sonia Afroz
  • Comrades

    • Andy Worthington
    • Angela Saini
    • Aqoul
    • Bartholomew’s notes
    • Blairwatch
    • Bleeding Heart Show
    • Bloggerheads
    • Blood & Treasure
    • Butterflies & Wheels
    • Campaign against Honour Killings
    • Cath Elliott
    • Chicken Yoghurt
    • Clive Davis
    • Daily Mail Watch
    • Dave Hill
    • Dr StrangeLove
    • Europhobia
    • Faith in Society
    • Feministing
    • Harry’s Place
    • IKWRO
    • Indigo Jo
    • Liberal England
    • MediaWatchWatch
    • Ministry of Truth
    • Natalie Bennett
    • New Humanist Editor
    • New Statesman blogs
    • open Democracy
    • Our Kingdom
    • Robert Sharp
    • Rupa Huq
    • Septicisle
    • Shiraz Socialist
    • Shuggy’s Blog
    • Stumbling and Mumbling
    • Ta-Nehisi Coates
    • The F Word
    • Though Cowards Flinch
    • Tory Troll
    • UK Polling Report
    • Women Uncovered
  • In-laws

    • Aaron Heath
    • Ariane Sherine
    • Desi Pundit
    • Get There Steppin’
    • Incurable Hippie
    • Isheeta
    • Neha Viswanathan
    • Power of Choice
    • Real man’s fraternity
    • Route 79
    • Sajini W
    • Sarah
    • Sepia Mutiny
    • Smalltown Scribbles
    • Sonia Faleiro
    • The Langar Hall
    • Turban Head
    • Ultrabrown



  • Technorati: graph / links

    The “race industry” and blaming the left for racism


    by Sunny on 10th June, 2009 at 4:35 pm    

    There are two strategic reasons why the BNP was elected. First, the Labour party vote split and collapsed. Secondly, the left was split by infighting and small, inconsequential parties that had not much separating them. These things can be debated, and it’s right to ask why the Labour party has failed the working classes.

    What does annoy me though are attempts by rightwing commentators, who really should know better, to pin the blame on ethnic minorities themselves and “the left”. It’s a nice rhetorical trick that makes them feel better - it’s not like the Conservative Party ever appropriated the language of the racists and had any of their members use the slogan “If you want a nigger for a neighbour vote Labour“. I mean that is just the work of fantasy isn’t it?

    On centre-right, Graeme Archer, who usually is quite a sensible writer, is blaming the left for the rise of the BNP. Apparently there are two main culprits:
    1) The rise of the “race industry”
    2) The funding of anti-racism festivals such as Rise, which now has been axed by Boris (there wasn’t enough money to fund his PR people probably).

    But there’s a lot missing from this simple and naive narrative.

    First, the “race industry” is a bunch of civil society organisations started by activists who were pissed off being constantly demonised and decided they had to organise themselves politically. Anyone who blames the “race industry” for the rise of racism, than actual prejudice is hilariously deluded.

    It smacks of people like Nick Griffin saying he isn’t racist but merely a reaction against organisations such as National Black Police Assocation (which doesn’t have a bar on colour for applicants BTW) rather than understanding that perhaps the creation of the those organisations was a reaction against the widespread and open racism that my parents generation had to bear.

    But of course, in the minds of many Tories such racism didn’t exist. It’s just all in the minds of these dastardly ethnic minorities and their “race industry” which have to survive by playing the victim card.

    And what about the festivals?

    You have to remember that turning the tide against racism wasn’t an easy task. The trick was to make it culturally unacceptable. Media organisations such as the Daily Mail and Sun have only recently, reluctantly it seems, accepted that racism is terrible.

    Thirty years ago the massive Rock Against Racism festival was the beginning of the cultural tide against racism. It made anti-racism cool and the link between many popular bands and the National Front was slowly cut until they were pushed to the margins of popular culture.

    Hence, music festivals such as Rise and others have always been seen as an important battle against racism, to reinforce the cultural norms that push racism to the margins of popular culture. This is an ongoing battle not one that ever ends. I say that as a matter of fact not because I feel victimised - popular culture is always changing and shifting, and the increasing political legitimisation of the BNP’s narratives (asylum seekers are a huge drain on our economy, white men are being victimised everywhere etc) makes anti-racists nervous.

    But I know what’s going on here.

    As the BNP become legitimised, the Conservatives are deliberately trying to scrub their racist history and create a new one where racism is the fault of the left and New Labour. If they hadn’t let the immigrants in then Britain would have been a utopia. Let’s just completely ignore the massive National Front marches that used to take place during the days of Thatcher. They were clearly the fantasy of the “race industry”.

    There are two deep contradiction in this narrative that the Tories don’t want to talk about. They are the fans of neo-liberal economics and free markets, yet fail to accept that with free market capitalism comes free movement of labour and massive unstability amongst the working classes. That, to them, is creative destruction. And yet they want their cake and eat it too - attack New Labour from the economic right while attacking from a culturally conservative “stop all immigration” perspective.

    Secondly, they don’t want to acknowledge that sometimes racism grows because the establishment legitimises their narratives rather than challenges them. We know that people like Phil Woolas, Margaret Hodge et al don’t have anything intelligent or visionary to say about race relations. They were happy to let out the occasional racist dog-whistle in order to pretend they cared. The Tories on the other hand actually regurgitated this nonsense.

    People in the UK believe there are far more immigrants and asylum seekers than there actually are. People in this country believe there are far more Muslims than there actually are. They believe that asylum seekers automatically get lots of housing and free money from the government - the complete opposite of reality. How did this come about? It came about because neither the Tories nor New Labour challenged the racism in the press. And now, to absolve themselves of blame, they’re trying to blame the left again. What a joke.



      |   Trackback link   |   Add to del.icio.us   |   Share on Facebook   |   Filed in: British Identity, Other racists, Race politics, The BNP




    68 Comments below   |   Add your own

    1. DonaldS — on 10th June, 2009 at 4:43 pm  

      Come on, Sunny, *everybody* knows that before there was any “race industry” there was absolutely no racism in this country… yes?

      What with this, and “the BNP are really lefties”, I do worry that the next governing party doesn’t have a frigging clue about race and racism. All they seem to have learned in 12+ years out of power is that black and brown people can often do jobs as well as white people. And that one shouldn’t be openly and obviously rude about their heritage in public (well, most of them have learned that one, anyway). *Nothing* else.

      And I was thinking that, for all its faults, Conservatism was about knowing and respecting your political history. Obviously not.

    2. Adnan — on 10th June, 2009 at 4:44 pm  

      You did not mention a certain anti-BNP activist who posts here a lot and also puts forward this kind of argument.

      About time there was a posting on this subject. This should generate a lot of heat, and, hopefully, some light.

      Regarding the “BNP leftie” argument - when they talk they seem to self-identify themselves as opposed to the Left e.g. a senior BNP blogger on HP was posting with the greeting “Hello Lefties”.

    3. DonaldS — on 10th June, 2009 at 4:50 pm  

      BTW, I should also add (disclosure and all that) that I have met Graeme, and like and respect him. I enjoy reading his stuff, often.

      But for me, that wasn’t one of his best.

    4. Rumbold — on 10th June, 2009 at 4:55 pm  

      As Sunny rightly points out, to blame the ‘race industry’ is idiotic and misguided. Festivals like Rise are pointless, but I can’t see how they contribute to BNP’s aura.

    5. Shatterface — on 10th June, 2009 at 5:05 pm  

      This is a good article and I hate to be picky but, well, I’m going to be picky on a couple of points.

      First, the collapse of the Left wasn’t because the vote was split: if you combine the votes for all the vaguely left-wing parties they still put up a piss-poor show and I’m wary that calls to unite amount to little more than a rallying cry to get behind Labour at the next election with the ‘threat’ of the BNP as a conveniant bogeyman. (And do you regard the Greens, for whom I seem to remember you saying you’d vote for ‘inconsequential’?)

      Secondly, the flipside of calling the Tories hypocrites for being in favour of the free flow of capital but against immigration is that the Left is hypocritical if it supports immigration but is against the free flow of capital.

      But I’m definitely behind you on the promotion of ethnic diversity.

    6. Shamit — on 10th June, 2009 at 5:11 pm  

      I echo Rumbold’s points.

    7. Joe Otten — on 10th June, 2009 at 5:18 pm  

      But here is the germ of truth to it. The left is often guilty of thinking that there is a ‘lump of labour’ - a number of jobs to go round, and that therefore if A gets a job, that means B can’t.

      Believing that, naturally unemployed people of whatever colour resent working immigrants of whatever colour.

      But it isn’t true. If a random million working people dropped dead tomorrow, there wouldn’t be that many vacancies created. Not only because they might have rare skills, but also because 1 million fewer people spending money represents a big contraction of the economy.

      I don’t suggest that there is never competition for jobs, rather that the competition for jobs is visible, but the benefit of the extra workers producing is generally invisible, and usually evens the score.

      The evening up can fail when supplies of something are limited either intrinsically or by state intervention, or lack thereof. Housing is one example of this. The housing shortage needs to be addressed more than ever.

      Nevertheless, the left is at fault here because it concentrates on sharing the pie, rather than growing the pie. If you’re poor, the suggestion of sharing the pie with more people is not going to be attractive.

    8. Twitted by EnviroChem — on 10th June, 2009 at 5:20 pm  

      [...] This post was Twitted by EnviroChem - Real-url.org [...]

    9. Shamit — on 10th June, 2009 at 5:38 pm  

      “Nevertheless, the left is at fault here because it concentrates on sharing the pie, rather than growing the pie. If you’re poor, the suggestion of sharing the pie with more people is not going to be attractive.”

      That is something Tony Blair understood and Gordon brown understands as well but there are way too many commentators such as Tonybee, Freedland etc etc etc who just don’t get it. And they also seem to be the majority when it comes to blabbing on the web.

      One of the key reasons the labour party irrespective of what they do now would lose this election is the loss of the aspirational voter who view Brown’s premiership and centralisation of public service delivery as a throwback to the old days of the left.

    10. cjcjc — on 10th June, 2009 at 5:38 pm  

      We know as Joe says that immigration has a broadly neutral economic effect. Of course the economy grows overall, but the net effect *per head* is very small.
      So the moral case - it obviously makes the immigrant better off, while having no net effect on the existing population - is clear. Humanity overall is better off.

      The offsetting problem is that the costs and benefits are unequally distributed: the rich benefit while wholly insulated from social tensions; the poor suffer competition for lower-skilled jobs, public services and housing. I know Sunny hates the neo-liberals but big business loves open immigration. The opposition does not come from that quarter. The rich benefit.

      And of course there is some absolute limit to the numbers as well as some limit to the annual numbers who can be successfully accommodated, or whatever term you wish to use.

      The real problem is not the “race relations industry” - though I wouldn’t say it had been helpful - but the sense (probably the truth) that the government has no control over the numbers, that it would rather lie than tell the truth (probably true - although it may not know the truth!), and that anyone who objects on let’s say NIMBY grounds to endless housebuilding - a concern not wholly to be dismissed - can be smeared by *some* on the left.

      And there is the democratic question. Does the population of the UK have the right to limit entry, if it wishes to do so?

      For whatever reason, rightly or wrongly, many people feel that there has been a lot of name-calling if they even raise the issue. And, let’s face it, there has been.

    11. Fitzroy — on 10th June, 2009 at 5:40 pm  

      Bravo Sunny, good article.

      There has been little challenge to some of the anti-immigrant crap in the past few years, because it’s been, falsely believed to be a “legitimate white working class” [(c) Frank Field] concern. Surely it’s the job of Government to challenge this misperceptions and to the media (The DM, Express, etc) not to stir things up by telling out-and-out falsehoods (and I’m not talking about opinions - merely false reporting).

    12. Sunny — on 10th June, 2009 at 5:43 pm  

      Nevertheless, the left is at fault here because it concentrates on sharing the pie, rather than growing the pie. If you’re poor, the suggestion of sharing the pie with more people is not going to be attractive.

      That is a different economic argument to make for immigration. Neither Labour nor the Tories have made this argument, certainly not forcefully. Though Labour has made it more than the Tories, who are completely influenced by the MigrationWatch agenda.

      The other problem with your thesis is that if the economy does in act contract, then its the immigrants who get most of the blame. What then?

    13. Jonn — on 10th June, 2009 at 5:44 pm  

      Was Hodge really blowing dog whistles? Genuine question, I don’t know the answer.

      The BNP Vote in Barking came about largely because of perceived unfairness over housing, as well as the collapse of the Ford factory. The issues of that particular, mostly white, community weren’t being addressed by either Labour or the Tories, so the BNP could sweep in. I’d guess a lot of their vote aren’t actively racist in the way Griffin and co are, they’re just picking the party that’s actually bothered talking to them.

      The fact that party is a bunch of moronic racists who are no more a master race than I am a mauve e-type Jaguar is almost incidental.

      I thought that Hodge’s point, badly expressed as it was, was that those kind of communities were less likely to vote BNP if anyone else actually tried tackling their problems.

      But I’m open to the possibility I’m entirely wrong and she is actually a massive racist.

    14. Sunny — on 10th June, 2009 at 6:03 pm  

      Jonn - Margaret Hodge said that people were angry because they thought asylum seekers got a lot of houses.

      But why say that unless you want to legitimise that concern, rather than point out it’s rubbish? I wrote about it then here:

      http://www.guardian.co.uk/commentisfree/2006/apr/18/whatthebnpspopularitytells

      and there’s this:
      http://www.newstatesman.com/200510240018

      These people are all for telling is why some people vote BNP, but not very good in countering it.

    15. Jonn — on 10th June, 2009 at 7:08 pm  

      Fair points. I’d forgotten the exact quotes Hodge came up with.

      I do think there’s a tendency on the left to assume that racism is the only reason people vote BNP. That’s self-serving: it abrogates Labour of responsibility for policies that may be responsible, and it means they don’t have to do anything but criticise.

    16. halima — on 10th June, 2009 at 8:19 pm  

      Good article Sunny.

      The mind boggles, we are debating what led to the BNP’s success .. and across the pond there’s been a shooting of a security guard outside the national Holocaust museum . I am outraged that this happened and in the US. The guard died.

      White supremacists are white supremacists whatever they call themselves - and whatever distractions are used to argue their corner we know their game - left or right, aren’t that stupid but it’s like we get lost in debates and words. Let’s freakin’ organise in this country and hold our politicians to account better. That’s the safest way to protect ourselves from the BNP.

    17. persephone — on 10th June, 2009 at 9:48 pm  

      “People in the UK believe there are far more immigrants and asylum seekers than there actually are. People in this country believe there are far more Muslims than there actually are. They believe that asylum seekers automatically get lots of housing and free money from the government - the complete opposite of reality. How did this come about?”

      Indeed how did this come about when at every opportunity we are all asked our ethnicity upon almost any form we fill in. There must be so much data that the Govt & other orgn’s have now which show the breakdown of what is really is going on - but they do not seem to publish it or refer to it when certain media decide to print racist hogwash. I never see the CRE, Diversity reps work to issue facts which would make a mockery of the assertions made by certain media & the BNP

    18. DisgustedOfTunbridgeWells — on 10th June, 2009 at 9:51 pm  

      Good article.

      I’m not even sure what the ‘race industry’ is. However the largest proportion of blame can probably be placed at the door of the ‘winterval industry’ - those who invented a succession of false narratives designed to act as a crutch for racists who want to convince themselves they’re being persecuted, despite the vast majority of these stories being disproven, those who subscribe are either unwilling or unable to accept reality instead choosing to repeat lies ad nauseam, anyone pointing this out is inevitably ‘politically correct’ or an ‘elitist’.

      I’ve been talking about the globalization aspect (those who have pushed ‘immigration’ as some sort of atomized phenomenon haven’t helped either, though I suppose that was never their intent) for a long time, it was the right who told everyone TINA and it was the right who told the working class to get on their bikes after making record numbers of them unemployed under the auspices of ‘foreigners do it cheaper and/or better’.

      The right’s inability to logically marry their love of freedom of capital with the restriction of labour (foreign labour, obviously the 5.5 million brits who live abroad are to remain free to do as they please) is, surprisingly enough, not the left’s problem.

    19. shariq — on 10th June, 2009 at 10:02 pm  

      Shamit, I agree that there are some on the left that are suspicious of trade and economic growth. They need to be tackled and debated with. This is one of the reasons that I don’t support the Greens - they seem to argue simply for lower growth rather than reducing emissions in a pro-growth context.

      However, the current contractions in the economy have shown that rather than creating a bigger pie, new labour policies have contributed to filling it with a lot of air (sorry for the poor analogy - supposed to be a variation of inflating the bubble).

    20. Amrit — on 10th June, 2009 at 11:34 pm  

      This is probably a less-than-adept point to make, but I can’t help thinking that even if the govt. closed all the borders and give all jobs to British whites or whatever… they’d still find a way to blame forruns! How? Outsourcing.

      People whinging about immigrants taking everything forget that businesses can always go elsewhere if the labour won’t come to them.

      Not that all businesses would, but it would be interesting to see…

      How did this come about? It came about because neither the Tories nor New Labour challenged the racism in the press.

      ThankyouthankyouTHANKYOU. Let us not forget the class element of all this as well. Middle/ upper-middle-class people (I mean economically) tend to produce and work for the publications such as the Heil, Sun and Express which spread racist, xenophobic, anti-Semitic, anti-Muslim bilge among the working/ lower-middle classes.

      It’s always seemed like divide-and-conquer, class-style, to me. Keep the plebs - immigrants and working classes - fighting amongst themselves so that they don’t aspire for more. More people might wake up to the fact that we don’t live in a perfect meritocracy! Paul Dacre would certainly lose out on that sweet salary if his paper started having to be more honest about things.

      It benefits political careerists too, because they can avoid doing their jobs properly whilst people are too cynical and uninformed to challenge them. Britain will always have a fairly apathetic society, but the growing cynicism is deffos new…

      I’m not even sure what the ‘race industry’ is

      Me neither!

      Anyone who blames the “race industry” for the rise of racism, than actual prejudice is hilariously deluded.

      Sunny, you clearly don’t spend enough time amongst Cif commenters, do you? The level of projection going on there is quite breathtaking (not just on a race front either).

      I MUST link these:

      http://www.guardian.co.uk/commentisfree/2009/jun/07/sotomayor-racism-supreme-court

      http://www.guardian.co.uk/commentisfree/2009/jun/10/white-male-heterosexual-oxford-officer

      If you haven’t read the first, Sunny, you totally should!

      (Ahem, I know RD is taken, but please could you tell her I love her? Thank you).

    21. Vikrant — on 11th June, 2009 at 12:10 am  

      People in the UK believe there are far more immigrants and asylum seekers than there actually are. People in this country believe there are far more Muslims than there actually are. They believe that asylum seekers automatically get lots of housing and free money from the government - the complete opposite of reality. How did this come about? It came about because neither the Tories nor New Labour challenged the racism in the press. And now, to absolve themselves of blame, they’re trying to blame the left again. What a joke.

      That i very true. I was talking to a UKIP concillors the other day and she was claiming that 1500 immigrants arrive from the commonwealth everyday, which simply isn’t true even by migration watch’s figures. It is alarming how mainstream the belief that Asians leech off system (British Asians are biggest tax payers by percentage infact) or that majority of immigrants came here illegally or on asylum ect have become.

    22. DisgustedOfTunbridgeWells — on 11th June, 2009 at 1:35 am  

      It’s always seemed like divide-and-conquer, class-style, to me. Keep the plebs - immigrants and working classes - fighting amongst themselves so that they don’t aspire for more. More people might wake up to the fact that we don’t live in a perfect meritocracy! Paul Dacre would certainly lose out on that sweet salary if his paper started having to be more honest about things.

      Something I haven’t seen mentioned much is what George Oborne revealed on newswipe a few weeks ago, that NL and Murdoch COLLUDED to manufacture faux outrage amongst the proles regarding refugees.

      I think it was also Oborne who revealed that NL would routinely try and pass laws they knew violated ECHR so they could throw their hands in the air and say “hark at how our hands are tied by pesky EU bureaucrats” which also contributed to the winterval industry, people believing things that aren’t true.

      They’re all in it together, with their little fucking ‘westminster village secrets bullshit clique’.

    23. Leon — on 11th June, 2009 at 3:08 am  

      Good post, particular liked the point about the continued need to play within the cultural arena to make racism unacceptable. The loss of Rise is a particular blot on the current London administration.

    24. Gege — on 11th June, 2009 at 7:52 am  

      The rise of the BNP is the fault of everyone. Apart from london, our ‘communities’ are not integrated enough. This encourages racial groups to be suspicious of one another.

      The local population knows that many minorities would import wives from abroad rather than allow their sons or daughters marry an english man/woman. why should they feel comfortable with such developments?

    25. Random Guy — on 11th June, 2009 at 8:13 am  

      Good post Sunny. I especially agree with the whole idea of the Conservatives trying to revise the actual historical facts for political expediency. It is an interesting aspect because we have now nearly fully transitioned to the ‘next’ generation (post Playstation-Generation), so it is more necessary than ever to have a coherent historical narrative that cannot be distorted - within the ethnic minority communities if not everywhere else. I wonder if any such initiative has even been mooted…

      Also, completely agree with the whole idea of the media not being challenged on many of its narratives over the last 5 - 10 years.

      And in my opinion, the ‘rise’ of the BNP is overhyped, although cause for some concern. I don’t see yahoos like Nick Griffin having the competency to pull off anything further than racist conspiracy theories. There is no more substance to the man or his party.

    26. Ravi Naik — on 11th June, 2009 at 9:02 am  

      And in my opinion, the ‘rise’ of the BNP is overhyped, although cause for some concern.

      That’s my opinion as well. The BNP did have less votes in 2009 than in 2005 in Yorkshire and North West, and barely won. I am hoping this is an outlier, not a trend.

    27. persephone — on 11th June, 2009 at 10:01 am  

      What is particularly pernicious is the re-packaging of race issues as the race ‘industry’ - an old tactic used to depersonalise issues affecting people.

      By turning it all into a business it leads to the direct association that the driver is to make revenue and not tackle a legitimate social concern.

      Additionally, by turning it into a business, people who like to see themselves as non racist feel legitimised in their opinions because the target is not a certain group of individuals (which would be seen as overt racism) but against a revenue led & faceless corporate organisation.

      And the media like nothing better than to position a corporate business as faceless & money hungry in order to topple it.

    28. Shamit — on 11th June, 2009 at 10:10 am  

      Perse

      Nice angle and good insight.

      pernicious - nice word very appropriate.

    29. billericaydicky — on 11th June, 2009 at 10:11 am  

      Let us get a few definitions in here. The first is the “race relations industry”. Let me give you my definition which I will do by going back to when it all started.

      The Labour government in 1965 started something called the Community Relations Commission which was a small and not very powerful mediation organisation brought into being because of the recognition that the racial composition of the country was changing and was likely to keep doing so.

      It bumbled on for a number of years but was seen by the people who made decisions as being unable to contain the growing militancy of sections of the black and Asian working class and with the advent of the seventies and the rise of the National Front and the increasing involvement of black and Asian youth in the anti fascist movement a new, more powerful organisation was needed.

      In 1976 the Cpmmission for Racial Equality was formed and the Act that brought it into being gave this unelected and unacountable body wide ranging powers which it went on expanding until it was dissolved three years ago.

      I have described the CRE elswhere as the powerhouse of the RRI and it was. It had wide powers to institute investigations and prosecutions and there was no way that any institution public or private was safe from its witch hunting. In all of its hundreds of investigations into “racism” there were no aquitals and no appeals. To be investigated was to be found guilty, The Spanish Inquisition didn’t even have that conviction rate.

      A council for instance would be investigated because it didn’t have enough ethnic minority staff. The CRE would find some kind of allegedly “racist culture” and would order that outside consultants be brought in to monitor the situation.

      These outside Equality and Diversity consultants were very often former employees of the CRE like Herman Ouseley or supposedly far left “activists” like Linda Bellos who had set up private companies. Multi million pound contracts were awarded to individuals who were little more than snake oil sales people peddling fictitious cures for non existent ailments.

      We were now caught in a vicious circle. In order for the CRE and the private sector to continue in business, and that is exactly what it was, racism had to be found. Like all good practitioners of what was purporting to be a profession in the way that brain surgeons and civil engineers are members of theirs, the race industry practitioners claimed an absolute right to defined racism and no attempt to contradict them was permitted.

      People like myself arguing from the anti fascist left were told condescendingly that while we might be well meaning we simply didn’t understand the complexities of their profession. Any other critics were decried as racists.

      The attitude is summed up by the journalist Nicholas Frazer in his excellent book on the far right “The Voice of Modern Hatred”.

      ” In Leicester I visited the offices of the race awareness bureaucracy. Their offices had a scuffed look, and they were full of yellowing issues of defunct consciousness-raising magazines. I found that people wanted to talk about Stephen Lawrence, the young black man stabbed to death by white thugs six years previously.

      One activist explained to me that unwitting or unconscious racism demanded perpetual vigilance. The defination of racism changed, as we did, day by day. This meant that the sightings of racist acts or statements would vary according to where the onlooker was placed. I must have looked blank because he reached for a simile. ‘it.s like a moving staircase in the arrivals area of an airport. A sign will be different depending on where you’re looking from”

      I’ve heard similar garbage for this type of person over the years and while many were simply cynical opportunists in it for the money many actually believed the crap they were coming out with.

      Eventually as resentment at the anti white witch hunts, the internal fighting between Asians and people of African descent about promotions, the misapropriation of huge amounts of money and finally the rise of the BNP vote brought about by thirty years of inventing racism the government had enough and Trevor Phillips was brought in to close the shambles down and merge it with the equalities commission.

      The damage lives on in a festering resentment amongst white people at what they saw, quite rightly in many instances, as an organisation dedicated to presecuting them.

      Alongside the CRE were a number of other quasi officila organisation non of which was ever elected but which, over the years wielded a lot of power and consumed vast amounts of public money.

      Some of them came out of the American influenced Black Panther movement and others from the Marxist unfluenced anti colonial organisations like the Movement for Colonial Freedom.

      These traditions produced people like Darcus Howe and A Sivanandan of the IRR. Howe eventually got control of the magazine Race Today and launched a brand of black nationalism which described black youth mugging white people as revolutionary and a refusal to go to school on the part of the same youths as an uprising against the colonial education system.

      At the IRR Sivanandan and other Marxist influenced “intellectuals” used Marxist-Leninist quackery to produce three decades of dire, turgid and unreadable drivel to “explain” eveything that was wrong with white society from the point of view of a philosphy that has now been dumped by the people who had it forced on them for six decades.

      What was common to these two traditions was that they were funded by organisations like the World Council of Churches and various leberal charities who were either guilt tripped in coughing up or actually believed the crap being spouted.

      The influence of these two strands is now negligable but they provided a base for the next generation of “militants” who would cause far more damage to race relations.

      It was without doubt the coup carried out by Ken Livingstone the day after Labour won control of the GLC in May 1981 that the rot really started to set in. What has rightly been described as the loony left got control of an number of London councils at the same time and, fighting what they saw as a semi fascist government under Thatcher, began to throw money at supposed equality projects.

      One of the things that very few if any commentators remark on is the fact no matter how much money is thrown at these schemes they always never seems to achieve their stated goals and come back for more cash.

      From 1981 it was a case of escalation gradually until Livingstone became Mayor in 2000 and the cash really started to flow to the projects. Behind Livingstone was a Trotskyist group called Socialist Action which had devise a wierd theory that the revolution had to come from the oppressed and that the white working class were not revolutionary, they never had been particularly but no one seems to have noticed.

      The anti fascist movement had to be black led because whites were racists, all public and private institutions had to be representative of the communities they served. This meant quotas, monitoring and observing. Dozens of “black led ” groups sprang up financed by the taxpayers of London non of whom had been elected and, as it was to turn out, unaccountable very largely for the money they received.

      In point of fact very little of the money intended for the very often deprived ethnic minorities ever actually filtered through to them in terms of benefits like any improvements in their standards of living. The same was true of white people but no one cared about them as they were irredemiably racist because of the colour of their skin.

      All the while the jamboree was going on the BNP was quietly beavering away making good use of the plentifull supply of ammunition handed to it by the Lee Jaspers of the industry. At the same time the government was becoming concerned about the growing BNP vote and the increasing demands of the industry.

      Finally the CRE was shut down and with the exposure of the financial scandals of Lee Jasper funded groups the writing was well and truly on the wall. Without any shadow of a doubt it was the perception by white people of Ken Livingston as being against them and favouring minorities which brought him down.

      The industry is now in full retreat with only a much truncated OBV left in the field but the damage from thirty year of persecuting white people lives on with us in the shape of the BNP.

      That then is my view of what the race relations industry is, or rather was. A hugely profitable financial scam for a whole ragbag crew of otherwise unemployable racists which lived off the notion of various forms of so called racism many of which they had actually invented.

      And finally a word on carnivals. I have never been able to define when the urban myth becomes the urban lie. By the time the ANL and Rock Against Racism were formed in 1977/78 the NF was in decline and had been for several years having peaked at the end of 75 and the beginning of 76.

      It is impossible to have a carnival against racism, all of those attending are highly unlikely to support or vote for a far right party and they are justlike the standard left wing meeting, the converted preaching to the converted.

      Time for an early lunch and I will see what responses there haven been.

    30. Jai — on 11th June, 2009 at 10:41 am  

      I do think there’s a tendency on the left to assume that racism is the only reason people vote BNP.

      ************************

      The mind boggles, we are debating what led to the BNP’s success .. and across the pond there’s been a shooting of a security guard outside the national Holocaust museum . I am outraged that this happened and in the US. The guard died.

      White supremacists are white supremacists whatever they call themselves - and whatever distractions are used to argue their corner we know their game - left or right, aren’t that stupid but it’s like we get lost in debates and words.

      There was a gentleman on Sky News during the usual 11.30pm “morning papers review” segment last night who made some very good points. I’d agree with his conclusions, as follows:

      About 900,000 people voted for the BNP. There have been some suggestions in some quarters that large numbers of these would have been “protest votes” due to the expenses scandal, rather than an indication of racism on the part of the voters themselves. However, the public actually had plenty of other organisations to vote for other than the BNP (and the major parties), if they had wished to do so.

      Similarly, there have been claims about concerns regarding “immigration”, the “loss of Britain’s Christian culture”, and so on. Again, there were various organisations other than the BNP (and the major parties) which also attempted to address these issues, and which the public could have voted for.

      My own conclusion, correlating with the views of the reviewer on Sky News ? Huge numbers of people — possibly the majority of the voters concerned — voted for the BNP because they actually agree with and support its racist ideology and because they are racist themselves.

      Possibly an unpalatable fact for many people to acknowledge, but there it is.

      ********************************

      There have been many claims in the last couple of years about the “huge numbers” of ordinary British Muslims who are alleged to “sympathise” with the ideology and actions of Al-Qaeda and its affiliated terrorist/Islamist extremist groups, with all manner of alleged “percentages”, “extroplations”, “surveys” and “research data” supplied pertaining to the British Muslim population.

      Yet, after the recent elections, we now have hard proof of almost a million British citizens supporting an explicitly racist Neo-Nazi organisation which is attempting to seize power by exploiting this country’s democratic process.

      Food for thought, isn’t it.

    31. Jai — on 11th June, 2009 at 10:48 am  

      extroplations

      Spelt “Extrapolations”, obviously. Not a deliberate typo.

      Nearly got mistaken for a BNP supporter there. That was a close one.

    32. Shamit — on 11th June, 2009 at 10:55 am  

      “Yet, after the recent elections, we now have hard proof of almost a million British citizens supporting an explicitly racist Neo-Nazi organisation which is attempting to seize power by exploiting this country’s democratic process.”

      And we continue to make excuses for them just like many did for Al-Qaeda backers too in this country.

    33. Sunny — on 11th June, 2009 at 11:09 am  

      And we continue to make excuses for them just like many did for Al-Qaeda backers too in this country.

      Well, bill does a very good job above too. Apparently it’s all the fault of the witch-hunting CRE which forced nearly a million people to vote fascist. I mean, there obviously wasn’t any alternative, and only the BNP offered to call off the nasty dogs of the CRE/EHCR/Livingstone. The Tories are too politically correct presumably.

      The damage lives on in a festering resentment amongst white people at what they saw, quite rightly in many instances, as an organisation dedicated to presecuting them.

      ha ha ha! It’s good to know you can write with such passion bill.

    34. munir — on 11th June, 2009 at 11:16 am  

      billeracy dicky
      “the race industry practitioners claimed an absolute right to defined racism and no attempt to contradict them was permitted.”

      arent you the same billeracy dicky who when asked for evidence of a claim you made accused the asker of holocaust denial ? Mmm thats a bit rich

    35. munir — on 11th June, 2009 at 11:21 am  

      Sunny

      “Apparently it’s all the fault of the witch-hunting CRE which forced nearly a million people to vote fascist. I mean, there obviously wasn’t any alternative, and only the BNP offered to call off the nasty dogs of the CRE/EHCR/Livingstone. The Tories are too politically correct presumably.”

      Its true. Look at all the people in positions of power in this land. Nary a white male amongst them. I even heard the head of BBC religion is a mooslim

      The same people who accuse anyone who criticises the extreme neo-cons who premediatedly attack a country which didnt threaten them, Iraq or for the mess of that country of “always blaming the west” are now blaming the effniks and the Muslims for the rise of the BNP

    36. persephone — on 11th June, 2009 at 11:30 am  

      billericaydicky

      Remember Enoch Powell ? My parents certainly do - they also remember that throughout the 70’s, decline of NF or no, racism was rampant and overt. Perhaps their experience was different to yours some reason.

      Powell was in power before the so called invention of the race industry - organisations such as CRE were set up to tackle support for racism. Linking to what Jai has referred to @ 30, people like Enoch were supported by what one can only call other racists:

      In 1968 Enoch Powell made his controversial ‘Rivers of Blood’ speech in Birmingham, in which he warned his audience of what he believed would be the consequences of continued unchecked immigration from the Commonwealth to Britain and as he thought the introduction of the Race Relations Act 1968 was offensive and immoral.(The Act would prohibit discrimination on the grounds of race in certain areas of British life, particularly housing). Powell received almost 120,000 (predominantly positive) letters and a Gallup poll at the end of April showed that 74% of those asked agreed with his speech. After The Sunday Times branded his speeches “racialist”, Powell sued it for libel, but withdrew when he was required to provide the letters he had quoted from.

      After the ‘Rivers of Blood’ speech Powell was transformed into a national public figure and won huge support across Britain. Three days after the speech, on 23 April, as the Race Relations Bill was being debated in the House of Commons, 1,000 dockers marched on Westminster protesting against Powell’s “victimisation”, and the next day 400 meat porters from Smithfield market handed in a 92-page petition in support of Powell.
      _________________

      It is the first time I have ever heard the CRE (or its prior incarnations) likened to the Spanish Inquisition. My friend’s father worked there and from what he related, it took a lot of ammunition for cases to be taken up - so much so that most cases were upheld. That is the reason why if you were investigated you were most likely guilty. Not all cases were taken up due to the mammoth amount of ammunition that had to be gathered which was costly - hence why they had to ask for more funding.

      I have worked in many industry sectors where there have not been any investigations by CRE bodies - some of which needed to be investigated. You make it sound as if the whole of British industry is riddled with CRE investigations. I say not enough are.

      As to people feeling persecuted, well Powell was also thought to be the ‘victim’ after his famous speech.

    37. munir — on 11th June, 2009 at 11:32 am  

      Jai

      “There have been many claims in the last couple of years about the “huge numbers” of ordinary British Muslims who are alleged to “sympathise” with the ideology and actions of Al-Qaeda and its affiliated terrorist/Islamist extremist groups, with all manner of alleged “percentages”, “extroplations”, “surveys” and “research data” supplied pertaining to the British Muslim population.

      Yet, after the recent elections, we now have hard proof of almost a million British citizens supporting an explicitly racist Neo-Nazi organisation which is attempting to seize power by exploiting this country’s democratic process.

      Food for thought, isn’t it.”

      Bravo Jai Bravo. The number of Muslims in al Muhajiroun or al Qaida type orgnisations are tiny. This despite years of the slaughter of hundreds of thousands of Muslims around the globe in Bosnia, India, Kashmir, Chechyna , Iraq, Palestine etc etc
      and its important to note the denial of democratic means to acquire freedom (something not true of people in the UK). Yet we have 1 million people in this country voting BNP because they cant find a job and 52 people were killed on the underground. And in Europe its far far worse.

      To paraphrase Robet Clive “at this moment I stand astonished at my own communities’ moderation”

      People often blame Islam for Muslim extremism but actually it should be commended - if it wasnt for the patience it continually emphasises and belief in ultimate justice in the next life it teaches the number of Muslims joining such extremists would be far far higher.

    38. cjcjc — on 11th June, 2009 at 11:40 am  

      No wonder the “left” is useless at fighting the BNP - except via egg throwing.

      You would rather decry anyone - including billericaydicky who seems to spend half his time on the doorstep campaigning against the BNP - who thinks that those who vote for them might *just possibly* have a *scintilla* of a legitinate concern, or that CRE and others’ good intentions (leaving the commercial interests referred to aside) might *just possibly* have had unintended consequences.

      As I assume he has spent rather a lot of time talking to potential and actual BNP voters - more than anyone else here I would guess - he might be a useful resource for those who *claim* to want to defeat the BNP.

      But then that might just involve getting down from high horses, which is never a comfortable exercise, is it?

    39. cjcjc — on 11th June, 2009 at 11:41 am  

      People often blame Islam for Muslim extremism but actually it should be commended - if it wasnt for the patience it continually emphasises and belief in ultimate justice in the next life it teaches the number of Muslims joining such extremists would be far far higher.

      What a comforting thought.

    40. Adnan — on 11th June, 2009 at 11:54 am  

      cjcjc @ 38,

      The egg throwing stunt was pathetic, but I wonder if they went to Rent-An-Egg-Thrower themselves.

      I find it difficult that somebody who spends so much time in anti-BNP activities often peddles theories that would not look out of place a BNP meeting as fact. Maybe that’s what you need to be a success at it.

      That’s my concern as a brown-skinned person, not as a “leftie”.

    41. Shamit — on 11th June, 2009 at 11:59 am  

      Munir

      Other people besides Muslims have been slaughtered throughout history and many at times by Muslim invading armies…

      Why do you always try to turn every thread into Muslims vs everyone?

      Do you think BNP or their racist supporters give a toss about the religious differences between Asians? I think not.

      And the worst is you actually know this. So why go down that route?

      I am perplexed

    42. persephone — on 11th June, 2009 at 12:04 pm  

      cjcjc @ 38

      Am not sure if this pigeon holes me into being on the ‘left’… but what if that which you call a ‘legitimate’ concern is racism by another name.

      Some people in power may have what they see as a ‘legitimate concern’ over employing women in the workplace due to their thinking that all women have a penchant for dropping a plethora of babies at every opportunity. Do we change the laws of the land to accommodate their concerns? No. We would say they do not have legitimate concerns but are discriminating against a certain group.

    43. cjcjc — on 11th June, 2009 at 12:12 pm  

      Well we know what the concerns are (likely to be)…competition for jobs/holding wages down, finding that a large number of your child’s classmates struggle with English (likely to hold him/her back as they get more attention or the class can only make slow progress), competition for housing, competition for NHS appointments, social tensions on the streets often driven by tensions between different groups of immigrants and where the police are not often seen…are those “racist” concerns?

      The rich of course are insulated from all such problems.

    44. Amrit — on 11th June, 2009 at 12:23 pm  

      Might I just say, that as a feminist, I think there’s little justification for the attitudes that people are trotting out here.

      N.B.: I have come to notice that ‘legitimate concerns’ is a racist dog-whistle.

      persephone’s comments were brilliant. People do disguise their racism that way, by hiding it behind apparent concerns over faceless bureaucracy, authoritarianism and ‘where their money is going.’

      I love all the people on Cif especially, who post things along the lines of: ‘If it wasn’t for New Labour, I wouldn’t be a racist!’

      The stuff about ‘witch hunts’ made me think of the comments I see on rape articles, where males go on and on about the evil women who make false allegations (despite them being a very small %) and use that to silence legitimate concerns about the way rape is effectively permissible in our culture.

      Silencing is being attempted here. billericaydickey in particular might not intend for that to be the effect, but IT IS. The comments I have seen elsewhere, like cjcjc’s (and chavscum’s) effectively tell people that they should shut up or put up, because we live in a meritocratic society, honest!

      Whether or not bd is a frequent campaigner, I don’t know. What is blatantly obvious to me (and other readers!) is that he has a chip on his shoulder about ‘black racists’ and seems to think that his work with Bangladeshis means he can escape allegations of racism.

      BULLSHIT.

      What people keep referring to as ‘legitimate concerns’ are based in mere fucking ignorance, more often than not steadily supplemented by a diet of right-wing rags and a deeply provincial mindset. If the WWC are as bd paints them, why would they even know or care about the likes of the CRE anyway? I’d never heard of them until recently, and I’m Asian!

      I’m bored of seeing this racial privilege smarting everywhere. Next time, I may just turn round and say ‘Yeah, yeah, ethnic minorities and women rule the world secretly, and it’s all a conspiracy against you. Now give me the population breakdown for this country and tell me who’s in government, bitch.’

      And cjcjc - I’m sure if he had ideas, rather than just blame (obsessive blame, for the same handful of ‘black racists’ EVERY TIME), maybe he WOULD be ‘a useful resource,’ as you put it.

    45. Sunny — on 11th June, 2009 at 12:27 pm  

      who thinks that those who vote for them might *just possibly* have a *scintilla* of a legitinate concern, or that CRE and others’ good intentions

      I suspect many Hamas people also have “legitimate concerns” when they worry about Israeli occupation. Does that make you want to blow people up cjcjc?

    46. Shamit — on 11th June, 2009 at 12:33 pm  

      Perse - Excellent points

      Amrit -

      “I’m bored of seeing this racial privilege smarting everywhere. Next time, I may just turn round and say ‘Yeah, yeah, ethnic minorities and women rule the world secretly, and it’s all a conspiracy against you. Now give me the population breakdown for this country and tell me who’s in government, bitch.”

      Brilliant

      yeah somehow thickos and pseudo journalists fail to see that

    47. cjcjc — on 11th June, 2009 at 12:45 pm  

      @45 - eh?
      I’m not sure voting for the BNP is the equivalent of blowing people up, is it?

    48. hantsboy — on 11th June, 2009 at 12:46 pm  

      What is the Race Industry ?
      How much is the pay ?

    49. persephone — on 11th June, 2009 at 12:52 pm  

      @ 43

      The racist concern is that there are those that want to win the competition by virtue of the colour of their skin.

      And as to schooling concerns…

      Have you not heard that in the last few years of primary school classes are streamed? Plus there is a causal link that the amount of attention & direction given at home by your family is linked to educational performance. Parents are expected to read with their children at home as the best & early readers are those that see their parents reading for pleasure at home - this is even before a child starts school.

      Are people feeling so persecuted by ‘immigrants’ that it incapacitates them at home? Someone is playing the education victim here.

    50. Amrit — on 11th June, 2009 at 1:01 pm  

      finding that a large number of your child’s classmates struggle with English (likely to hold him/her back as they get more attention or the class can only make slow progress)

      May I just say here and now, that this is highly unlikely, at least in my experience? I recently worked at a school with a LARGE number of immigrant and ethnic minority pupils, in a fairly socially-deprived area. Sooo, you’d expect to see a lot of what you just described here, no?

      No. The biggest obstacle to progress was children testing teachers’ patience and refusing to concentrate (even up to GCSE level, but much less so at that stage). The school had an EAL department - English as an Additional Language. I’m sure the likes of bill would view this like the CRE, of course.

      The EAL department worked with students outside of class time, or provided teachers to support students in class, to bring them up to an acceptable level of English. I never saw a lesson being disrupted by a student’s lack of understanding, despite the fact that we have LOADS of EAL and special-needs kids there.

      Where, can someone please tell me, are things happening in such a way? Where are teachers pandering to EAL students? Maybe outside of London? I’d like to know.

    51. persephone — on 11th June, 2009 at 1:28 pm  

      @ 43: “The rich of course are insulated from all such problems.”

      You mean like the privately educated (cough, cough, depends what you mean by education here) Nick Griffin?

      It must be heartening for you to know that you have a leader who understands your plight.

    52. Jai — on 11th June, 2009 at 1:57 pm  

      I’m not sure voting for the BNP is the equivalent of blowing people up, is it?

      Considering the BNP’s aspirations and end-game in relation to this country’s non-white population, yes it is the equivalent of supporting an organisation involved in “blowing people up”.

    53. cjcjc — on 11th June, 2009 at 1:57 pm  

      @51 - that’s perfect.
      Griffin is “my leader” now, is he?
      You have just perfectly proved my point.
      (Though luckily you don’t need to listen to me - I didn’t vote for them.)

      Well, anyway, good luck with your campaign against the BNP.

      All you seem to have in your armoury is eggs.

    54. Sunny — on 11th June, 2009 at 2:13 pm  

      cjcjc - I guess the race industry is to blame for this as well then!

      http://www.socialcohesion.co.uk/blog/2009/06/white-supremacy-terror-plot.html

      And the guy who shot people in the Holocaust museum, blame Obama! It’s his fault, and there at least blacks really do really rule! lol.

    55. damon — on 11th June, 2009 at 2:15 pm  

      Gosh, this thread has moved fast, and I have to go to work in 15 minutes.

      By tomorow evening it when I am free to read this properly, it will probably be all over.

      So can I just say that surely ”the race relations industry” does exist. (?)

      And here is an example of it: ”Diversity Solutions”
      started by former Labour councillor Linda Bellos.
      http://www.diversity-solutions.com/about.html

      Check out their ‘client list’.

      What do they have to do to get your local authority or police force to give them thousands of pounds for ”diversity awareness” courses?
      (Make them an offer they can’t refuse?)

      I’ve never been on one so I shouldn’t be overly skeptical (but I can’t help but thinking it’s a bit of a racket).

    56. cjcjc — on 11th June, 2009 at 2:28 pm  

      You do need your break, dont you?! :-)

      There are dangerous nutters, and there are ordinary people with genuine fears.

      Treating the latter like the former may make you feel better, but it won’t help defeat the BNP.

    57. DisgustedOfTunbridgeWells — on 11th June, 2009 at 3:18 pm  

      There have been many claims in the last couple of years about the “huge numbers” of ordinary British Muslims who are alleged to “sympathise” with the ideology and actions of Al-Qaeda and its affiliated terrorist/Islamist extremist groups, with all manner of alleged “percentages”, “extroplations”, “surveys” and “research data” supplied pertaining to the British Muslim population.

      Yet, after the recent elections, we now have hard proof of almost a million British citizens supporting an explicitly racist Neo-Nazi organisation which is attempting to seize power by exploiting this country’s democratic process.

      Food for thought, isn’t it.

      Despite all the white terror plots of late, you can bet you’ll never see the home secretary turning up in burnley telling the ‘white community’ to get it’s extremists in order.

      Some people are just fucking nasty and the winterval industry has spent the past few years insulating those people from the reality of their own abhorrence; yeah you hate Muslims, but KFC in some east London backwater only serve halal meat so it’s only fair that you’re a massive cunt/have ‘legitimate concerns’.

      I suspect many Hamas people also have “legitimate concerns” when they worry about Israeli occupation. Does that make you want to blow people up cjcjc?

      Don’t be silly, only white tabloid readers can have ‘legitimate concerns’. People who, for instance, might think having an asylum system described as ’shameful’ or being an ‘endemic surveillance society’ is a bad idea are just being politically correct.

    58. persephone — on 11th June, 2009 at 3:56 pm  

      @51

      “Griffin is “my leader” now, is he?”

      Judging by the things you have raised on this topic - yes

      “You have just perfectly proved my point ” & “All you seem to have in your armoury is eggs.”

      Can you prove your point as to legitimate concerns. It remains unanswered & therefore comes across purely as (racist) egg throwing.

    59. persephone — on 11th June, 2009 at 4:03 pm  

      @ 56 “genuine fears.”

      Any substantiation?

      Such as factual information that underpins the legitimacy (or should I say truthfullness) of fears, concerns etc

    60. Jai — on 11th June, 2009 at 4:09 pm  

      There are dangerous nutters, and there are ordinary people with genuine fears.

      Treating the latter like the former may make you feel better, but it won’t help defeat the BNP.

      “There are dangerous nutters, and there are ordinary people with genuine fears.

      Treating the latter like the former may make you feel better, but it won’t help defeat Al-Qaeda or Al-Muhajiroun”.

      ****************************************

      Or the Pakistani version:

      “There are dangerous nutters, and there are ordinary people with genuine fears.

      Treating the latter like the former may make you feel better, but it won’t help defeat the Taliban”.

      ****************************************

      Is the quoted statement still valid in relation to an appropriate response towards the organisation’s supporters ?

    61. damon — on 12th June, 2009 at 8:59 am  

      As well as ”Diversity Solutions” which I mentioned @ 55, (who persuade all these organisations to part with serious money to attend their seminars): …
      http://www.diversity-solutions.com/clientlist.html

      I have also heard people from a group called ”Black Mental Health” on a BBC London radio show (mainly for the black community) giving their opinions over the course of an hour …. and when I asked my NHS physiatrist friend had he heard of them, he rolled his eyes somewhat and said that his department was bombarded with correspondence from groups like that, always suggesting that he and his colleagues needed to attend their courses to understand how institutionally racist they were. (My friend is an Indian Sikh … and wouldn’t understand the particularities (for example) of mental health issues that might affect Black/Caribbean people etc).

      Here is their website: ….
      http://www.blackmentalhealth.org.uk/
      That’s an industry in the way that ”health and saftey” is an industry these days isn’t it?

      And finally, can I flag up ”Cultural Competence”
      http://www.google.co.uk/search?hl=en&q=cultural+competence&meta=
      I haven’t heard of it much in the UK, but in the US it does seem to be a part of this (well intentioned, but perhaps ultimately PC) ”industry”.

    62. Adnan — on 12th June, 2009 at 9:07 am  

      Damon @61

      Seeing as you mentioned this again: for “Diversity Solutions”, race is only one of the topics covered - the others being age, gender, disability, sexual orientation etc. If there is a raft of legislation in these areas then why shouldn’t organisations attend seminars to avoid any potential problems ? Really it’s a bit of non-issue.

      And regarding an earlier comment by Bill, what’s so hypocritical (implied smear) about some old Lefties like Linda Bellos having their own businesses ? Why shouldn’t they be experts in these matters?

    63. damon — on 12th June, 2009 at 9:28 am  

      Adnan, a fair point maybe. But you’d want to know what line exaxctly it was that they took on any particular issue. And I’d imagine that ”rafts of legislation” stem from the politics that are thought up by self appointed (and career providing) groups like Diversity Solutions.

      I’ve never been to any myself, but it would be interesting to hear people’s experiences of being sent along to attend these ”awareness courses”.

      I would say that they ARE contentious, because who is to say what is the right line to take in any particular situation?

      For example, here is a letter in The Voice newspaper from a black policeman, about the politics of The Black Police Association.
      http://www.voice-online.co.uk/content.php?show=14529

      He (not me) said this, so it makes me wonder.

      ”The BPA of today I feel is now a power hungry political group operating within the Met, whose members are focused on achieving personal success by continually brow beating the Met under the banner of racism by issuing misleading press statements. ”

    64. Adnan — on 12th June, 2009 at 9:52 am  

      Damon,

      taking sexism as an example.

      Once upon a time there was a big IT company (so fairly educated workforce) with a high-powered sales executive, who went on maternity leave. Her boss and some other male colleagues had a juvenile attitude and quips were made about how much she was getting paid and there was various other unpleasantness, so she took action and received a fair bit of money.

      The firm then rolled out appropriate training across the UK to avoid the same happening again.

      The legislation is there for a good reason.

    65. damon — on 12th June, 2009 at 8:50 pm  

      My point though Adnan is the question of who’s wisdom on these matters is seen as the line to be followed.
      I mentioned that Diversity Solutions was started by Linda Bellos.
      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Linda_Bellos

      Now, overall she sounds like quite a nice person, and I would broadly go along with many of the things she might propose, but I wouldn’t particularly care to be sent to one of her seminars by my employer and feel that I had to accept everything that was said without question.

      Same as you (one) might be broadly sympathetic to left and liberal ideals, but that doesn’t mean that you’d necessarily swallow everything from some small particular leftist organisation.

      My suspicion is that there is a kind of race ”industry” where lines are given and pushed hard, and dissenting voices are attacked, (and sometimes spurious allegations thrown).
      I think it happened to me on another leftist website.

      I would raise up this idea (”Post Traumatic Slave Syndrome”) that I’d heard being discussed on the radio by people of an Africanist world view, and be skeptical of its validity in relation of young black in Britain today.
      http://www.google.co.uk/search?hl=en&q=post+traumatic+slave+syndrome&meta=
      Those PC leftists (because that’s what I thought they were) hated a (white) guy like me being skeptical of theories like PTSS, and told me I wasn’t qualified to discuss the subject.

      And my linking to an article like this one ”Chaining black youth to the victim culture” was met with hostility (while I think it’s rather good).
      http://www.spiked-online.com/index.php?/site/article/3002/

      My negative experience (over quite a long time) with these people, led me to the conclusion that there was a problem with the bossy dictatorial left, in dealing with issues and ideas that it didn’t care for, (because they came from outside the orbit of a certain kind of leftism).

    66. damon — on 13th June, 2009 at 10:30 am  

      I went to The Rise festival in 2007 and I must say that I found it rather dull. It seemed so far away from the festivals of 30 years ago that Sunny talked about in the opening piece.
      What struck me was the kinds of people that were NOT there. The kinds of working class young people that the original RAR concerts were sucessful in attracting.
      I remember walking up Blackstock Road and seeing that most of that area’s North African community were carrying on as usual.. and not going to the concert in the park. Simmilarly, later I walked up Green Lanes (with it’s large Turkish and Kurdish communities) and it seemed that the young lads there were hanging out in their snooker clubs as usual.

      Sunny said this: ”Anyone who blames the “race industry” for the rise of racism, than actual prejudice is hilariously deluded.”

      I didn’t think there had been a ‘rise’ in racism in this country. I thought there had been a massive tailing of of seriously prejudiced views over the last 20 years.

      Also, this line leaves me somewhat puzzled: ”As the BNP become legitimised …”.
      Really? I can’t think of anywhere where I’ve heard good things being said about the BNP’s recent Euro election success.

      I think that the BNP have benefeted from a hardening of attitudes of that (rump?) of society that is ’somewhat’ racist, and open to Daily Express type propaganda, and resents being lectured on why they are so wrong by the (well meaning but bossy) left.

      I know people like that, and it’s hard to get through to them.
      Just yesterday for work I had deliveries in Whitechapel Road (near Brick Lane) and in Stratford, and then drove up Leytonstone High Road and out to Essex.
      Even me, a commited anti-racist (and someone who loves London’s multi-cultural concoction) is struck when walking through Whitehapel market at just how utterly it has changed. Go past the Blind Beggar pub where on 9 March 1966, Ronnie Kray shot and murdered George Cornell, an associate of a rival gang, the Richardsons, as he was sitting at the bar, and you wonder what happened to that old London.
      Most of it moved out is the answer.
      And later doing a delivery in Basildon, there were the white people from places like Whitechapel and East Ham originally, who were persuaded to move to crap new towns like Basildon and Harlow.

      In Stratford I was parked in a side street near Braodway as a school turned out for the day, and white kids were such a minority. The kids were fine, and just going about their business and larking about, but later in the evening as I took some cross country roads back through Essex as the sun was going down, (just for the scenic drive and views of the fields and through villages), I looked at the people standing outside some village pubs and wondered what they might think of Stratford and Whitechapel.

      Leytonstone high road can look interesting and lively (which is how it looks to me), or you could look at the same road and see a right dump of a place.
      The stamp of ‘the down at heal’ scruffy neighbourhood is clearly apon it, as is the look of (cheap) ethnic minority businesses predominating.
      I suppose some people don’t like that kind of neighbourhood, but I much prefer it to an Essex new town (or village) or a sedate white town like Worthing in Sussex.

      That many of the eldely white people of Worthing would hate to live in today’s Leytonstone or Stratford or Whitechapel may be considered racism by some people, but I think it’s human nature for some people to be parochial and Daily Mail minded.

    67. David — on 13th June, 2009 at 11:58 am  

      Sorry, but if you insist on an approach that splits people up and labels them as groups, rather than as individuals, it’s no surprise the someone will take advantage of this to come up with a “white” group. The left’s approach to society and race simply leaves the way open for the BNP.

    68. Talking about immigration | Newpapers Collected — on 13th June, 2009 at 3:40 pm  

      [...] Sunny Hundal takes issue with Graeme Archer’s Centre Right blogpost on how an over-zealous "race industry" helped nurture the BNP. I think Sunny is a little unfair this time. Yes, Archer oversimplifies - the UK was certainly no colour-blind utopia before the Race Relations Acts came in - but he clearly states that there’s a lot to admire in multiculturalism. He’s simply worried that government-enforced tolerance (no bad thing in my book, by the way) has its limitations. An unarguable point, I would say. As Trevor Phillips has argued, organisations like the CRE needed to broaden their scope and [...]



    • Post a comment using the form below

    Pickled Politics © Copyright 2005 - 2009. All rights reserved. Terms and conditions.
    With the help of PHP and Wordpress.