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  • Operation Blue Star - 25 years on


    by Sunny
    3rd June, 2009 at 11:50 pm    

    This week is the 25th anniversary of the three day long siege of the Golden Temple by the Indian government. That siege of course not only led to the deaths of hundreds of people, but also led to Indira Gandhi’s assassination, the anti-Sikh pogroms in New Delhi (and other parts of India), the mid-air explosion of the Air India flight to Toronto (killing over 300 people) and the “counter-insurgency” operations in India which led to the further deaths and imprisonment of tens of thousands of Punjabis.

    Let’s just say it is a pretty big anniversary in the Sikh calendar. Of course, going by the non-existent coverage across the British media you’d be forgiven for thinking they don’t really give a crap about the nearly half a million Sikhs that live in the UK. Especially since the 1984 attacks had a huge impact on Sikh families in the UK.

    Anyway, I have an article on the Guardian website about it. The point I want to stress is that I do not want to be the Sikh spokesperson for the Guardian newspaper and explicitly told them that I’d only write about 1984 if they had some other people also writing on the issue. I didn’t really want to write about the history, but focus on the implications of 1984, 25 years on, from a specifically British perspective.

    Except of course, when I sent in the first draft I was told they’d spiked the other piece and I was the only person writing about 1984. Really. That’s how much bloody interest there was at the Guardian on Sikh affairs. I’m not happy about it, and I tried to be as balanced as I could while slipping in some thoughts about the negative impact 1984 had on Sikhs (apart from the obvious).


                  Post to del.icio.us


    Filed in: History,India,Organisations,Sikh






    30 Comments below   |  

    Reactions: Twitter, blogs
    1. pickles

      New blog post: Operation Blue Star - 25 years on http://www.pickledpolitics.com/archives/4710




    1. Shatterface — on 4th June, 2009 at 1:10 am  

      The media has a limited number of ‘narratives’ as far as news is concerned and ethnic minorities are only seen as of interest to the media if they can be framed as a ‘problem’.

      Behzti-protests aside - Sikhs seem to be pretty well integrated in the UK: even demands for special police headwear only provoke wry amusement rather than the ‘outrage’ the story needs to give it legs.

      You don’t even seem to have dietary demands we can get worked up about.

    2. Vikrant — on 4th June, 2009 at 1:23 am  

      Bluestar Sunny, was an ill conceived, ill timed and badly executed operation. We all agree on that. But to suggest that it is responsible for a host of other events is a bit taking it too far, especially the assertation that the Indian state is primarily resposible for Kanishka flight (which was flying to New Delhi from Toronto not vice versa.

      That siege of course not only led to the deaths of hundreds of people, but also led to Indira Gandhi’s assassination, the anti-Sikh pogroms in New Delhi (and other parts of India), the mid-air explosion of the Air India flight to Toronto (killing over 300 people) and the “counter-insurgency” operations in India which led to the further deaths and imprisonment of tens of thousands of Punjabis.

      No love for all those who “recaltriant” Sikhs and Hindus murdered by the Khalistanis? Your Guardian article reads little more than an apology for the Khalistanis. Indian army may well have “invaded” Golden temples, but in your eyes was it not defiled when Bhindranwale converted it into a fortress?

      I for one believe Khalistan movement was a byproduct of Indira Gandhi’s lust for power. If the old hag hadn’t flirted with Bhindranwale in a bid to oust the Akalis everyone would have been saved a whole lot of grief.

      Also re. your Guardian article, Bhindranwale wasn’t merely accused of anti-Hindu rhetoric as you so dismissively put it, the man was freaking responsible of a host of attacks, mostly towards Hindus in months leading upto the operation. Let us not pretend Bhindranwale was exactly a “Sant”!

    3. runescape gold — on 4th June, 2009 at 8:07 am  

      Hi there,
      Ugh, I liked! So clear and positively.
      Have a nice day

    4. London Muslim — on 4th June, 2009 at 8:21 am  

      No mention also of the impact Bluestar had on Sikh regiments in the Indian army some of whom mutinied at the time.

      Moreover, given the emnity that exists between Sikhs and Muslim for a variety of reasons: the Mughal legacy, partition etc I do find it interesting how the Indian state tries to discreetly perpetuate the animosity by the sectarian use of the Army.

      The commander who led the attack on the Akal Takht was Lt Col Israr Khan (a Muslim) something understandably not lost on Sikhs. Conversely, its not lost on Muslims the role Sikh soldiers have played in surpressing the independence movement in Kashmir.

      Clearly, the Indian state if its learnt anything from the British is how to play a dangerous game of divide & rule when it suits.

    5. Shamit — on 4th June, 2009 at 9:30 am  

      Sunny —

      Sikhs having a victim mentality - This post and your article in the Guardian seems to be implying that. I think that is a huge overreach.

      Also, Sikhs questioning whether they are integral part of India is definitely not very common among Sikhs in India irrespective of what some loonies in Southall, Birmingham or Vancouver say.

      I wonder what the many Sikh Service Chiefs of India would think of your opinions along with thousands of Sikh soldiers and officers who have served with great honour with the Indian Armed Forces.

      As recent as the Kargil war, the Punjab Regiment and the Sikh Regiment sacrificed most and got the most successes. I think your comments are not a very accurate portrayal of the Indian Sikh as most of India knows them.
      ******************************
      What happened to the Sikh community after the the demise of Indira Gandhi was sad, deplorable and a big blotch on India`s democracy and secular credentials. No one in their right mind would doubt that.

      And on the Operation BlueStar, what was the State supposed to do — you sound like those mullahs criticising the military action in Red Mosque.
      *******************************
      Got to run now but will definitely come back to this later. I think both the post and the tone of the article is divisive, not the usual thoughtful Sunny that we are used to.

    6. Shamit — on 4th June, 2009 at 9:46 am  

      You say:

      His death not only elevated the call for a Sikh homeland, but also made him an untouchable martyr figure despite his hardline stances.

      Really Bhindranwale a martyr among Indian Sikhs — I seriously doubt that assertion too.

      And no one except for some loony tunes in Canada and Britain still aspire for a separate Sikh homeland.

      Could you demonstrate some evidence of this mounting support for Bhindranwale or separation from India

      I would like to know the view points of the Prime Minister of India and the former and current Indian Armed forces officers as well as those other Sikhs who are respected, valued and are real patriots of India across business, sports, academia, economics and every other field.
      ***********************************
      May be I am wrong but I fail to understand the point of the article and the post.

      If you wish to discuss the atrocities committed against Sikhs after the killing of Mrs. Gandhi — you would have a lot of support.

      But the way you portrayed your argument makes me cringe as those are the arguments I expect RSS to make, I expect the Taliban and the mad cappers in Hamas and Hezbollah make and not the editor of Liberal Conspiracy.

      I would be happy to stand corrected if I got it wrong.

    7. Pav — on 4th June, 2009 at 10:14 am  

      #2: Vikrant I agree with some of the points you have raised.

      During the 80s, there was a feeling in ruling circles that the minorities had for far too long ‘been pampered’ and Hinduism needed to be saved. Indira Gandhi (‘majorities too their rights’), rather than counter the resurgence of right wing Hindvta, decided to ride it for political expedience.

      In Punjab in particular, organisations like the Arya Samaj and others were confident to goad Sikhs, and the reaction to this was Bhindranwale. In nearbouring Haryana and Rajasthan, attacks by the Hindu Suraksha Simiti on innocent Sikhs began in February 1984 and derailed the deal between the moderate Akali Dal Party and government which could have settled the largely Punjabi grievances vis-a-vie inter-state relations, water, power, capital city etc. Even the moderate Akalis were painted as secessionists. The die was cast. Indira, flagging in the polls needed another ‘Bangladesh’. Hence Operation Bluestar.

      Vikrant quite rightly states the attacks on Hindus and Sikhs before 1984 and after, particularly the sectarian killings of Hindus on Punjabi buses. These were widely condemned by Sikh leaders at the time, but this was rarely reported. The Congress (I) party made good these attacks to portray all Sikhs as communalists, setting the stage not only for Bluestar but a feeling in the country that the Sikhs needed to be ‘taught a lesson’.

    8. Shamit — on 4th June, 2009 at 10:19 am  

      London Muslim:

      No mention also of the impact Bluestar had on Sikh regiments in the Indian army some of whom mutinied at the time

      No mention of the Sikh Officers and other soldiers of the Sikh regiment who upheld their oath of loyalty to the Constitution and the President of India (who happened to be a Sikh) at the time

      The commander who led the attack on the Akal Takht was Lt Col Israr Khan (a Muslim) something understandably not lost on Sikhs.

      Conversely, its not lost on Muslims the role Sikh soldiers have played in surpressing the independence movement in Kashmir.

      Conversely, I hope the Muslims remember how the Indian Army and its Sikh Commander of the Battling Forces then GOC in C Eastern Command fought to protect innocent Muslims from being raped and killed by the Pakistani Forces.

      Oh the Pakistani Army were made up of Muslims too.

      ********************************
      Can we stop this communal posturing please?

      Look at India today and thesecular and democratic credentials of a country which happens to be the world’s largest democracy and just re-elected a Sikh Prime Minister.

      No other PM had that sweet victory except for Nehru.

      And no one can deny this is Manmohan Singh’s victory and people in India wanted him to be PM.

      Why is the diaspora always 20 years behind than the situation on the ground?
      ****************************

    9. Pav — on 4th June, 2009 at 10:21 am  

      #5: Shamit
      You quite rightly state that Sikhs are an integral part of India, and very successful at that. But should people be expected to ignore the huge human rights abuses that took place during Operation Bluestar and after? The Indian Civil liberaties group, the Citizens for Democrary, made up largely of Hindus and Sikhs and headed by the respected Justice Tarkunde, the reports from Associated Press correspondent, Brahma Chellaney and Indian human rights activists like Ram Narayan Kumar have all stated that after the army suffered losses on the first few days, they took revenge by carrying out a massacre of innocent pilgrims who were trapped (the temple was at maximum capacity owing to the Martydom Day of Guru Arjun).

      You mention Sikh army chiefs. While it is true, Sikhs like K.S Brar lead the attack, others like the late Lt. Gen Jagjit Singh Aurora, the hero of the war for the liberation of Bangladesh, were highly critical of the action, ie. Sending in heavy artillery and tanks in such a congested area. General Roychowdhury, former Chief of Army Staff stated in 2000 that the operation was ‘totally unwarranted and a mistaken step’.

      I have lived and worked in India and have met many Indians of all faiths who regard Bluestar as a mistake. Bhindranwale could have easily been taken out by commandos by minimal force as he frequently held public meetings on the roof tops of the temple. Or the food, fuel and electricity supplies could have been cut off by occupying the Guru ka Langer and thus isolating the Akal Takht. You may recall, 5 year later, when a group of militant had re-occupied the temple, the stand-off was peacefully resolved and the militants forced out, without any sacred building being blasted by tanks.

      Finally, you mention the events after Mrs Gandhi’s assassination as deplorable. Yes, but the reason people keep bring it up is that even after 25 years, none of the ring leaders, leading politicians of the Congress (I) party at the time have ever been brought to justice for the organized massacre of thousands of Sikhs throughout India. Recently, the Congress even tried to give party tickets to two of the accused to fight the elections from the very areas, in particular East Delhi, where a whole community was wiped out.

    10. Shamit — on 4th June, 2009 at 10:56 am  

      Pav

      I do not disagree with you and I would not dare challenge assertions made by former Generals on military tactics. I do remember Gen. Vaidya being heavily criticised for using heavy weaponry. So, we do not disagree there and I accept that Indian Armed Forces could have and should have used better tactics.

      However, this still does not support the arguments Sunny makes about victimhood and lionisation of Bhindranwale. Most Sikhs in India do not give two hoots about that guy. And I don’t think there is a huge movement of Sikhs wanting a separate homeland in India. My primary objections to the post and the article in Guardian pivot around those two issues.

      I also do not condone extra judicial killings of accused let alone innocents. And what KPS Gill did may have been effective but was equally destructive for many families. His actions had created more terrorists. And every single act should be investigated and justice delivered for thoe families waiting for so many years.

      There were protests from other State Governments when Punjab police commandoes were hunting down “terrorists” in other states and in some cases those so called “terrorists” were taken into protective custody by some of those states. This happened few times in West Bengal if I recall right.

      Also do not forget Sant Longwal was killed after signing the accord with Rajiv Gandhi.

      The Indian State also had a bigger picture to paint for separatist movements across the country and the State wanted to make Punjab an example. Both Rebeiro and KPS Gill have admitted to such and also the then Governor SS Ray.

      One thing the Indian State did gain out of ruthlessly putting down the Punjab insurgency was make massive headways in the North East especially with people like Laldenga in Mizoram who was iconic.

      It became clear to separatist leaders that India would not allow secession and most of them including Lal Denga who was defined as a terrorist came to the mainstream and served as elected politicians. Lal Denga was Chief Minister of Mizoram and the separatist movement In North East now is openly a criminal movement which has almost no support from their base.

      *********************************

      Both the Congress and BJP led Governments failed to react strongly to huge human rights violations in many parts of the country in Kashmir, Punjab, North East and Gujarat.

      I think what happened to the Sikh community was disgusting and people like Tytler should be in jail along with Modi.

      At least, finally, the political careers of Tytler and the other asshole is over, after the Congress party withdrew their tickets after a huge backlash and some say with very strong suggestions from the very popular Delhi Chief Minister Sheila Dixit.

      **********************************

    11. Pav — on 4th June, 2009 at 12:07 pm  

      Shamit: concur with much of your last post.
      However, I thinking Sunny was only stating the fact, however much people may not like, that Operation Bluestar unwittingly made a martyr of Sant Bhindranwale, despite his views. I know many people in India who hold this view. This weekend, Sikh organizations in India, including bodies like SGPC (Punjab and New Delhi) and the ruling Akali Dal will be marking the events.

      Why is this so ? I think because of successive government’s inability to admit to the enormity of the events of 1984 and to call to account those involved in human rights abuses, leading many in the Sikh community let down. Bhindranwale, after the Feb 1984 attacks on Sikhs in Haryana and Rajastan, even warned Sikhs throughout India that the government wanted to finish them off. 9 months later, his warning came to fruit.

      I was part of a debate a few days ago on BBC radio and some callers were saying we should ‘let bygones be bygones’ and stop ‘raking up’ this issue. Tell that to the thousands of widows and orphans throughout India whose 1984 is still alive. Sajjan Kumar MP was allowed to put his brother in his place for party nomination and won the seat. Both he and Jagdish Tytler MP, alleged organizers of the pogroms still maintain their innocents despite scores of affidavits submitted by the victims families. Many others politicians and leading police chiefs have escaped justice.

      The Congress (I) party itself, despite Manmohan Singh’s apology, refuses to accept complicity, its callousness towards the victims after the events and refusing to call an independent inquiry. The subsequent commissions were complete whitewashes. P.G. Gavai, Lt-Gen of Delhi in 1984 has, on record, stated that Rajiv Gandhi’s government ‘deliberately delaying’ calling in the Army so that to ‘teach the Sikhs a lesson’. He has also said that after all this time the Indian state is not prepared to ‘face up to the political complicity’ in the massacre.
      See Kristallnacht report regarding the 25 year cover-up: http://www.journalism.co.uk/66/articles/534389.php

    12. Shamit — on 4th June, 2009 at 12:29 pm  

      “This weekend, Sikh organizations in India, including bodies like SGPC (Punjab and New Delhi) and the ruling Akali Dal will be marking the events.”

      Those events would be more in memory of the innocent victims of the 1984 carnage. I doubt there would be much lionisation of Bhindranwale or the call for a separate Sikh state.

      I think those feelings are more dominant outside India than in India

      I was part of a debate a few days ago on BBC radio and some callers were saying we should ‘let bygones be bygones’ and stop ‘raking up’ this issue.

      I want us to discuss those issues and I think justice needs to be delivered against people like Tytler and other politicians as well as police officers.

      Justice delayed should not be justice denied in this case.

      What happened in Delhi was unpardonable and I would like some of the perpetrators especially the leaders and top police officers given life sentences and in some cases death sentences are warranted.

      However, the direct action in Punjab I think is more complicated and the responsibilities I think need to be shared by a hell of a lot of people.

      While the Punjab operation was executed by Gill, it was masterminded by the Chief Executive of the State, then Governor SS Ray.

      One of the reasons, SS Ray was appointed Governor (during President’s rule) due to his experiences in ruthlessly terminating the Naxalite movement in West Bengal in late 60s and early 70s. And, the accountability goes all the way to Rajiv Gandhi then PM.

      And as I said, it was also used as an example to show Paksitan the futile results of their strategy and send a strong message to other insurgencies within India.

      You would agree that the failure of supporting the Punjab insurgency made Zia Ul Haq use Kashmir and Islam as the bandwagon to try to destabilise India. Thats when terrorists and money and arms started flowing into Kashmir.

      The Indian State needed to put down the insurgency but that does not mean the indiscriminate killing and torture of thousands of innocent young men and destruction of families. And those should be investigated.

      But India was fighting a proxy war — and therefore I think to many policy makers in India, rightly or wrongly, Human Rights was a back burner issue. I realise that this would not pacify the losses felt by those who lost loved ones. But sadly, innocent victims are far too common in conflicts between States.

    13. nobodys fool — on 4th June, 2009 at 10:22 pm  

      If people want to understand the sikh struggle, start with the events that let to the storming of the golden temple which began the khalistan movement. What parts dd the rss, right wing hindu parties , the congress and the akali dal play. See how this couldron of hate boilled over with the sikhs wanting an end to their love affair with india. At one time the indian army had 500000 soldiers in punjab trying to control the unrest.over 100000 sikhs killed. So dont let anti sikh brigade sunny tell you khalistan only had a few supporters in brumm and brampton

    14. Shamit — on 5th June, 2009 at 7:34 am  

      “So dont let anti sikh brigade sunny tell you khalistan only had a few supporters in brumm and brampton”

      Who is the anti sikh brigade here? I hope you are not referring to me.

      And the chants of Khalistan are not heard in Punjab or Delhi today- they are only heard among the loony tunes in Brumm, Brampton and Missuisaga (and other suburbs of Toronto and Vancouver).

    15. munir — on 5th June, 2009 at 7:48 am  

      Shamit
      “And the chants of Khalistan are not heard in Punjab or Delhi today”

      Given the brutality of the Indian security forces thats probably quite wise

    16. munir — on 5th June, 2009 at 7:53 am  

      Shamit
      “Conversely, I hope the Muslims remember how the Indian Army and its Sikh Commander of the Battling Forces then GOC in C Eastern Command fought to protect innocent Muslims from being raped and killed by the Pakistani Forces.”

      Most of the Bangladeshis I know while strongly supporting the creation of Bangladesh dont have a particularly favourable view of India and dont think for a minute she was acting out of love for Muslims, rather than to defeat her enemy.

      And given the mass rapes carried out by Indian soldiers and the soldiers of Hinduvata in Kashmir and Gujurat graitude over what happened in 1971 seems less apposite for Muslims of the sub continent

    17. Shamit — on 5th June, 2009 at 8:05 am  

      Munir

      Could it be that most Sikhs are patriotic Indians and are integral to the success and defence of the country?

      Could it also be that most Sikh youth rather be part of an economic super power than fall for the tried and failed tactics and stupid words and dodgy funds from Pakistan — a country on verge of collapse?

      And obviously you are aware that the Government of India is led by a Sikh — and a large part of the Indian security services are Sikh.

      And I am trying to have a reasoned debate here with people who know a lot about the situation and I would be grateful if you please do not bring your usual spite and always bizzare if not filled with hate comments on to this one.

    18. curious? — on 5th June, 2009 at 6:02 pm  
    19. curious? — on 5th June, 2009 at 6:21 pm  

      Vikrant

      “Also re. your Guardian article, Bhindranwale wasn’t merely accused of anti-Hindu rhetoric as you so dismissively put it, the man was freaking responsible of a host of attacks, mostly towards Hindus in months leading upto the operation. Let us not pretend Bhindranwale was exactly a “Sant”!”

      Really Vikrant!!! Is that why there were no criminal cases registered against Sant Jarnail Singh, in fact the authorities tried to frame him after the murder of lala jagat narain but those charges were dropped after lack of evidence. Lets not forget that he voluntarily gave himself up for arrest so i doubt the reason for the gov’t attacking darbar sahib was to take out a figurehead

      regarding the bus killings of innocent hindu’s, well informed people in the movement claimed that this was orchestrated by the gov’t, in order to create a pretext for bluestar. the fact that sant jarnail singh did not order the killing of innocents speaks volumes. If you have evidence otherwise, then please inform.
      dushts who went against the panth by raping women, slandering the Guru’s, causing sacrilage of Guru Granth Sahib Jee, attacking Sikhs - well thats a different matter altogether.

    20. nobodys fool — on 5th June, 2009 at 9:30 pm  

      Another attack on sikhs by racist sunny. Why have you put this video of sikhs doing martial arts with weapons. For a cheap laugh. Is it to highlight the use of dangerous weapons in sports. Why have you not complained about riffle and pistol shooting or chinese and japanese monks using samarai swords in their disciplines. Even sword fencing . I know you have a loathing for sikhs so mock them at every opportunities.

    21. curious? — on 6th June, 2009 at 10:39 am  

      what do you expect from these neo liberal internet warriors :)

    22. Shamit — on 6th June, 2009 at 10:49 am  

      “Another attack on sikhs by racist sunny…………..I know you have a loathing for sikhs so mock them at every opportunities.”

      That’s uncalled for and whatever the point your are trying to make, no one in their right mind would call Sunny racist.

      “what do you expect from these neo liberal internet warriors”

      Many of these neo liberal internet warriors actually have pretty good track record on doing things in the real world rather than sprouting venom.

    23. Jagdeep (v2.0) — on 8th June, 2009 at 1:50 pm  

      You may be interested in a Webinar taking place this Saturday at 5pm GMT, hosted by the Sikh Research Institute, on June 1984: Myth vs Reality

      Find out more details at http://sikhri.webex.com

    24. curious? — on 8th June, 2009 at 1:53 pm  

      Subramaniam Swami (Hindu Indian Politician): “Government of India master-minded disinformation campaign to create legitimacy for its actions. Its goal was to ‘make out that the Golden Temple was the haven of criminals, a store of armoury and a citadel of the nation’s dismembment conspiracy.”
      Imprint, July 1984, “Creating a Martyr”, by Subramaniam Swami, pp. 7-8.

    25. Ajit Kumar,UK — on 9th June, 2009 at 2:04 pm  

      It is interesting that Pakistan supports a separate Sikh state.

      During the Sikh rule of Ranjit Singh the geographical area of today’s Pakistan punjab formed the majority of the Sikh Kingdom.

      Pakistan should give up ALL it’s Punjab provence to the Sikhs -because the sikhs DO deserve a separate land.In India they already have it in Punjab.

      ALL the Panj pyare who became sikhs were actually hindus.They became Sikhs to fight the tyrant mughals(I do know that there were kind muslims too who helped Guru Gobing Singh ji ).of course they were influenced by the teachings of Sikhism .

      Guru Gobind Singh ji’s father and all 4 sons were MURDERED by the mughal forces of Aurangazeb-and Pakistan holds Aurangzeb in high esteem….

      It took Pakistan 60 years to recriut ONE Sikh officer.

      Pakistan has made an ex ISI chief head of Pakistan Gurudwara committee…!

      The Sikh diaspora worldwide needs to wake up to this reality.

      Oh, by the way, if India is so bad, why dosen’t Pakistan give it’s Punjab province to the Sikhs?

    26. curious? — on 10th June, 2009 at 8:29 pm  

      Ajit

      “It is interesting that Pakistan supports a separate Sikh state.”

      Just like India and its agency R&AW support the balochistan movement

      “During the Sikh rule of Ranjit Singh the geographical area of today’s Pakistan punjab formed the majority of the Sikh Kingdom.”

      The good ol’ days :)

      “ALL the Panj pyare who became sikhs were actually hindus.”

      The panj piyaare came from low caste lineages and became Khalsas when they took amrit. But i’m sure there’s a source to state that the panj took charan pahaul amrit before this - which mean they would have been sikh beforehand.

      “Guru Gobind Singh ji’s father and all 4 sons were MURDERED by the mughal forces of Aurangazeb”

      Yeah but it was also armies sent by the Hindu Hill Raja’s and brahmins by the names of gangu and sucha nand who played their part in this.

      “It took Pakistan 60 years to recriut ONE Sikh officer.”
      Thats because theres only 5000 sikhs in pak compared to 20 million in india. I know the officer, Insp. Gulab Singh. He was was fastracked through promotion due to the respect that the authorities had for sardars.

      “The Sikh diaspora worldwide needs to wake up to this reality.”

      Who attacked Akal Taktht and ethnically cleansed Sikhs?

      “Oh, by the way, if India is so bad, why dosen’t Pakistan give it’s Punjab province to the Sikhs?”

      With Guru Sahibs kirpa, soon the singhs will have kabza over alot more than east punjab. Khalistan zindabad :)

    27. Ajit Kumar — on 11th June, 2009 at 10:33 am  

      Mr.Curious ji

      It is true that the hindu hill Rajas opposed Guru Gobind
      Singh ji’s rising influence.

      It is also true that gangu handed over Guru Gobind Singh ji’s sons to the muslim troops.

      I am also aware that mant Muslim pirs are highly respected in Sikh religion.The foundation of golden temple was done by a pious muslim saint.

      I myself, though a hindu have a lot of respect for muslim pirs , hindu saints and of course the sikh gurus.

      But there remains a fact that the Khalsa army rose from Hindus from ALL castes.It was a matter of pride for the hindu families to give their son for the panth.If I was in that age I would have joined the khalsa myself.

      And I WOULD have been PROUD to be a part of the Khalsa kingdom.And to lay down my life to protect
      my panth, my land, my family and my people.

      Isn’t it INTERESTING that NO ONE from this forum speaks about the brutal beheading of Guru Teg Bahadur ji or the murder of Guru’s children.

      Shall I tell you the REASON- because if this gets highlighted, the TRUE SIKHS will know who is a freind and a foe.

      By the way, if your Pakistani freinds treat Sikhs so well, why did they do a GENOCIDE of Sikhs during partition.

      LAST QUESTION-how much MONEY was paid by the Paki Intelligence agencies to the ‘so called Sikhs ‘ in UK and US and Canada to spread poison against India and esp Hindus?

      FACT- Sikhs in UK, US and Canada are JEALOUS OF Indian Sikhs because Indian Sikhs are well aware of the Sinister designs of Pakistan.

      I am proud of my Sikh brothers -not the sponsors of these pseudo Sikhs.

      I am equally proud of my Indian muslim and Hindu brothers who have made India strong.

    28. Ricky — on 15th June, 2009 at 12:40 am  

      Have just returned from Punjab; every other car is resplendent is stickers/transfers of Bhindranwale’s image and motif.

      I get the impression that Bhindranwale has obtained a cult like status amongst the youth. This is happening in the Punjab, not brum or toronto as some posters would suggest.

      History always repeats itself; rise in European facism, depression era recession etc.; soon Raj Khalega Khalsa.

    29. Akit Kumar,UK — on 19th June, 2009 at 2:45 pm  

      There is no doubt that Bhindranwale will remain in the minds of many Sikhs forever……just like Prabhakaran in many Tamils hearts.

      Can anyone answer my question?

      Guru Teg bahadur ji sacrificed his life to protect the Hindus.Guru Gobind Singh ji fought Aurangazeb and ALL his Khalsa army were proud hindus who became Sikhs as a matter of pride.They eventually protected their communities which was made up of hindus and sikhs(common sense).

      Bhandranwale or atleast SOMEONE in Punjab in the early 80s ORDERED massacre of all hindus-not only in Punjab but other parts of India too.These were INNOCENT hindus dragged out of home and buses and shot.

      I have tried reading Sikh religion as much as possible.

      Of course there is NO QUESTION of killing of hindus mentioned in Sikh religion.

      THE QUESTION:

      If Bhindranwale was a true sikh, who ELSE ordered killing of Hindus ?

      It HAS to be the I S I who spread this hatred and also carried out killing of hindus.

      A TRUE SIKH will NEVER kill a innocent hindu(or muslim)

      My Sikh brothers, PLEASE don’t get misled by the ISI - they murdered their own Bangladeshi fellow muslims-why DO YOU have high hopes that they will be kind to you in future?

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