Taliban blamed for Lahore attack


by Sunny
28th May, 2009 at 4:06 am    

New update: Two more blasts have hit Peshawar.

This is probably one of the biggest terrorist attacks in Pakistan in recent times. And I was in Lahore less than six months ago and it was so peaceful:

Pakistan’s government has blamed Taliban fighters for a bomb attack in Lahore which killed 23 people and left hundreds more injured. A group of men shot at police officers before detonating a powerful car bomb, damaging buildings belonging to the police and intelligence agency the ISI.

A group calling itself Tehrik-i-Taliban Punjab claimed responsibility for the bombing in a Turkish-language statement posted on jihadist websites, the SITE monitoring group said.

As I’ve said repeatedly this is why I supported the ousting of the Taliban and now Obama’s attempts to sort out the mess that George Bush made. The Taliban are expansionist, terrorist scum. If left alone they would have eventually moved to destabilise the whole of the Indian sub-continent. In other words provoke war between country in possession of nukes. Trying to sort out Aghanistan may be a near-impossible task, but it is still preferable to letting the Taliban rule it.

I hope that Pakistanis quickly realised the true nature of the Taliban, and every indication is that they’re waking up to this, because that’s the only way to ensure the Taliban’s downfall.


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  1. pickles

    New blog post: Taliban blamed for Lahore attack http://www.pickledpolitics.com/archives/4667




  1. luta — on 28th May, 2009 at 5:44 am  

    A LOGICAL END TO JIHAD ! ! !

  2. MANSI — on 28th May, 2009 at 5:46 am  

    meri jaan meri jaan TALIBAN TALIBAN ! ! ! CLAP CLAP CLAP

  3. Anon — on 28th May, 2009 at 7:09 am  

    I see this was written at four o’clock in the morning, and maybe Sunny wasn’t at his most alert, but this is pretty shoddy stuff.

    “The Taliban are expansionist, terrorist scum. If left alone they would have eventually moved to destabilise the whole of the Indian sub-continent.”

    If we’re talking about the Afghan Taliban here, this is nonsense. It was reported earlier this year that Mullah Omar had called on the various factions operating under the banner of Tehrik-i-Taliban Pakistan to unite, avoid unnecessary conflict with the Pakistan army and concentrate on aiding resistance to the NATO forces occupying Afghanistan. He has also urged an end to terrorist attacks in Pakistan carried out in the name of the Taliban.

    Which all goes to show how little influence the leadership of the Afghan Taliban has over what’s going on in Pakistan.

    Far from having ambitions to “destabilise the whole of the Indian sub-continent”, the Afghan Taliban are better understood as a Pashtun nationalist formation whose perspectives are limited to ending the occupation of their country. Even David Miliband appears to have a better grasp of the character of the Taliban than Sunny does.

    The idea that continuing, and indeed expanding, the NATO presence in Afghanistan will succeed in defeating the Taliban strikes me as absurd. All it will do is stoke up further resentment and allow the Taliban to acquire legitimacy in the eyes of many Afghans, or at least Pashtuns, as the leaders of a national liberation struggle against foreign occupation.

  4. sastaRasta — on 28th May, 2009 at 8:04 am  

    … Obama’s attempts to sort out the mess …

    Obama is attempting nothing of the sort. All he wants to do is estbalish his credentials as a ‘tough’ president. Or, I could be wrong and need to be educated. Bottomline is, more innocents are going to pay, this time in Pakistan (although their governments have been more than complicit). Looks to me like the Pakistanis on their part see an oppotunity to permanently ‘solve’ the NWFP problem.

  5. Irfan Ahmed — on 28th May, 2009 at 8:27 am  

    Sunny I agree with you the Taliban are scum and they are messing up everything for the rest of the people in Pakistan. The Pakistani Army should destroy them ASAP.

    Long live the army!

  6. Andrew — on 28th May, 2009 at 8:44 am  

    “A group calling itself Tehrik-i-Taliban Punjab claimed responsibility for the bombing in a Turkish-language statement posted on jihadist websites”

    That’s odd if correct. The statement is in Turkish – not Urdu or Punjabi? Sounds like an international connection then!

  7. platinum786 — on 28th May, 2009 at 9:10 am  

    ^^^ The TTP has a lot of foreign fighers in it. A large bulk of their foreign contingent is Uzbek, and Uzbeks and Turks are pretty ethnically close.

    The TTP have realised they can’t fight a real war. This was the first time they tried to hold territory and they have faced massive losses. All previous operations were anti terror operations, and they flopped with the tactics usedby the Pakistani army, this time it was taking back territory, something the Pakistan army train for day in day out. The TTP have there had to resort back to terrorism.

    Pakistan is heaven for someone who wants to carry out a terrorist attack. Gross mismanagement for decades has meant;

    - Plenty of extremists you can get to do your dirty work
    - Plenty of poverty so buying loyalty is cheap
    - Plenty of corruption so bribing official along the planning stage is easy
    - Total lack of any real police infrastructure so next to no fear of getting caught
    - Tonnes of weapons and explosives easily available

    I’m one of those people who thinks the Afghan Taliban and the TTP are not the same, and they aren’t allies. In Afghanistan the Taliban are fighting Tajiks and Uzbeks yet in Pakistan, they’re fighting alongside them? It doesn’t make sense. I think the TTP is more an amalgimation of the reminants of Al Queda, criminal elements in FATA and the NWFP, and extremist groups within Pakistan.

  8. Leon — on 28th May, 2009 at 9:31 am  

    I hope that Pakistanis quickly realised the true nature of the Taliban,

    You think they will while they keep having their friends and family killed by US predator attacks?

  9. platinum786 — on 28th May, 2009 at 10:06 am  

    It’s a shame the bombing is not happening in islambad, or near Larkana, or Raiwind, or at 90 or even Lahore. If the US drones were bombing the homes and power bases of our fuedal leaders then perhaps our government would care enough to stop them. Right now it’s only killing tribal pukhtuns, people who’s votes are not accessable to the PML or the PPP or the MQM, and who’s dead can be smeared as terrorists.

    It’s a 20:1 ratio to terrorists and civillians, thats US figures, not Pakistani ones.

  10. fug — on 28th May, 2009 at 10:11 am  

    the west shouldnt have unleashed such violence on the taliban and afghanistan in the first place.

    hard to keep that near history in mind when the messy present raises its gruesome head.

    duas all around.

  11. munir — on 28th May, 2009 at 10:40 am  

    Leon -exactly – its a battle of two terrorists- the US/Pakistani Army and the Taliban

    Suggests Sunny looks at the civilians numbers killed by the Pakistani army in Swat. Its more than 23.

  12. platinum786 — on 28th May, 2009 at 11:15 am  

    Munir, I wouldn’t expect anything more from a HT supporter and a Taliban sympathiser. Pakistan is fighting a war, there are casulties in war, including civillian ones, it is inevitable. People like you don’t have a solution, only a a problem with everything else.

    The simple fact of the matter is the TTP challenged the writ of the state, the state is now enforcing it again. If your opposed to it, go stand in the way.

  13. munir — on 28th May, 2009 at 12:57 pm  

    platinum786
    “Munir, I wouldn’t expect anything more from a HT supporter and a Taliban sympathiser.”

    Are you talking about me? I am neither.

    “Pakistan is fighting a war, there are casulties in war, including civillian ones, it is inevitable. ”

    Is that what the (non state) terrorists say?

    “People like you don’t have a solution, only a a problem with everything else. ”

    I do have a solution- sit down and talk. To jaw jaw is always better than to war war.

  14. Anon — on 28th May, 2009 at 1:21 pm  

    #7 “I’m one of those people who thinks the Afghan Taliban and the TTP are not the same, and they aren’t allies.”

    Most informed commentators would agree that they’re not the same, and that the TTP pursue their own agenda which is not at all identical with that of the Afghan Taliban.

    It’s now been reported that the TTP have officially accepted responsibility for the Lahore bombing. The leadership of the Afghan Taliban certainly won’t welcome this, or for that matter the latest attack in Peshawar. Tactically, their interests lie in reining in the activities of militants in Pakistan and concentrating on resisting the build-up of US troops in Afghanistan.

    Also, the militants in the Swat valley are repeatedly described as Taliban, although the main group there is the Tehreek-e-Nafaz-e-Shariat-e-Mohammadi, which has existed since 1992, and the relationship between the TNSM and the TTP is unclear.

    The Swat militants too are pursuing their own agenda independently of the Afghan Taliban, from whose standpoint it would have been preferable for the TNSM to have maintained its compromise agreement with the NWFP government, and not given the army an excuse to intervene.

    The problem here is that the term “Taliban” is used to refer to different forces in Afghanistan and Pakistan which have different objectives and at most only a loose connection.

    To portray the “Taliban” as a unified movement promoted from Afghanistan and seeking to “destabilise the whole of the Indian sub-continent” is just a fantasy. But a useful fantasy from the standpoint of those who want to find a justification for further US military intervention in the region.

  15. platinum786 — on 28th May, 2009 at 1:36 pm  

    How much more are they going to interfere, they practically micro manage Pakistan without the invasion and fake bullsh1t required to invade. Though we should never say never when neo-cons are involved.

    Did you know, the TNSM is run by the father in law and the TTP is run by the son in law? Also the TTP is pretty new as an organisation.

    The relationship is Murky. Some claim the two leaders have beef between them, recently there were reports of sporadic clashes between TNSM and TTP, and the TNSM has in the past opposed the state, but now has been trying to play peacemaker. It’s beginning to look like the TNSM tried to play the good cop to the TTP’s bad cop, and it backfired.

  16. Sunny — on 28th May, 2009 at 1:37 pm  

    ar from having ambitions to “destabilise the whole of the Indian sub-continent”, the Afghan Taliban are better understood as a Pashtun nationalist formation whose perspectives are limited to ending the occupation of their country. Even David Miliband appears to have a better grasp of the character of the Taliban than Sunny does.

    Well, you’re guilty of the same generalising that I am. There are the Pashtun nationalists – but they aren’t the ones blowing up things in Lahore and going after Sri Lankan cricketers.

    These people the expansionist Taliban, and frankly they do want to remake Pakistan in their own image.

    Talking? With the Taliban? Not gonna work I’m afraid. They tried that when the Taliban took over Swat, with the result that the Taliban took that time to regroup and then start focusing on taking territory closer to Islamabad.

  17. Naadir Jeewa — on 28th May, 2009 at 5:26 pm  

    Taliban opposes occupation of “their country”? They invaded in the first place.

    And if you want to pass blame onto the US of micromanaging, it demonstrates a certain inability to appreciate Pakistan’s own substantial agency in creating its own problems. For years, the army and ISI told the US they had all these groups that they originally started under control, and one by one lost them all. Now they’re on a very expensive disaster recovery operation. Twats. The lot of ‘em.

    PS: Still think rapprochement with India is the only way of stopping the army considering links with these groups, and shift investment from military spending to education.

  18. qidniz — on 30th May, 2009 at 3:44 am  

    The latest: it looks like they nailed Fazlullah in Swat.

  19. Calculating_Misfit — on 31st May, 2009 at 8:12 pm  

    @qidniz

    A bit premature there qid….

    “Meanwhile, NWFP Information Minister Iftikhar Hussain said it was not sure if Fazlullah was dead or not. He was commenting on media reports that said Fazlullah could already be dead. “There is no confirmation whether he is dead or not. It’s only a rumor.””

    http://www.dailytimes.com.pk/default.asp?page=20095\30\story_30-5-2009_pg1_8

  20. audentior_watcher — on 3rd August, 2009 at 8:54 pm  

    sighs…

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