Mixing at the BBC Asian Network


by Rumbold
11th May, 2009 at 4:34 pm    

Is the BBC Asian Network doing enough to feature mixed (i.e. on the basis of ethnicity and/or religion) couples and persons? MixTogether asks the question after Vijay Sharma, head of the BBC Asian Network, rejected the idea for a show (summary here):

“The central plank of their argument- that they do not wish to place Asians into boxes based on ethnicity, religion or language- is nonsense. There is an established precedent for the station to broadcast to specific Asian sub-groups.

Their weekly schedule includes separate shows for Mirpuri, Bengali, Gujurati and Punjabi listeners, along with a two separate Hindi/Urdu shows. There are separate devotional sounds programmes for Islam, Sikhism and Hinduism, plus another mixed devotional sounds programme that includes Christian music. There could easily be a show for mixed families.”

Now, the rejection of the proposal doesn’t prove that there is a problem. After all, plenty of proposals are rejected. But there is a real problem with the lack of similar programming it seems (I don’t listen to the wireless much). Given that the Asian Network is supposed to focus on ‘Asian’ culture, the head of the network can hardly claim that she wants to avoid a “niche programming approach”. It is a niche channel by definition, and given that 10% of all married Asians had a spouse from a different ethnic group, they are hardly a irrelevance.


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  1. pickles

    New blog post: Mixing at the BBC Asian Network http://www.pickledpolitics.com/archives/4518


  2. Gori Girl

    Britain’s race politics are so odd when contrasted with the US Not sure which country I’d rather live in for that issue http://bit.ly/15XGn6




  1. mixtogether — on 11th May, 2009 at 5:01 pm  

    Thanks Rumbold.

    The question to bear in mind is ‘what harm would it cause if Asian Network had a show for mixed couples.’

    It would surely do no harm, and probably a lot of good.

  2. Sunny — on 11th May, 2009 at 5:25 pm  

    “The central plank of their argument- that they do not wish to place Asians into boxes based on ethnicity, religion or language- is nonsense.

    I see that Mixtogether is still running his idiotic crusade against all these racist Asians eh.

    Who actually said that was the central plank of the Asian Network? Their aim is to mainstream Asian programming – but that doesn’t mean everything on Asian Network has to be so mainstream that older British Asians – who pay taxes and pay the license fee – cannot listen to in their own language.

  3. Sunny — on 11th May, 2009 at 5:27 pm  

    So Mixtogether didn’t get his show on AN – boo fucking hoo.
    They do plenty of discussion about mixed race relationships anyway – half the Asians who listen in always complain that its too damn liberal!

  4. riazat — on 11th May, 2009 at 5:33 pm  

    so anyway Aaqil Ahmed got the job as BBC Head of Religion

  5. Gori Girl — on 11th May, 2009 at 5:42 pm  

    I’m always fascinated by these little glances into race relations & intercultural relationships in Britain, as opposed to what we have here in the US.

    I’m surprised the percentage of marrying out is so low for Asians in Britain – it’s about 25% in the US.

  6. marvin — on 11th May, 2009 at 5:42 pm  

    Keep it up MixTogether. Many people do prefer the ‘ostrich’ approach pioneered by Bradford council. Which as we all know worked out wonderfully…

  7. marvin — on 11th May, 2009 at 5:48 pm  

    People from South Asian backgrounds were the least likely of the minority ethnic groups to be married to someone from a different ethnic group. Only 6 per cent of Indians, 4 per cent of Pakistanis, and 3 per cent of Bangladeshis had married someone outside the Asian group

    http://www.statistics.gov.uk/cci/nugget.asp?id=1090

  8. Rumbold — on 11th May, 2009 at 6:34 pm  

    Sunny:

    As I said I don’t really listen to the radio. However, this was silly:

    “I see that Mixtogether is still running his idiotic crusade against all these racist Asians eh.”

    Some Asians are racist. Just as some white people are racist. As are people of all ethnic groups. I don’t really see what is so wrong about complaining about this.

    “Who actually said that was the central plank of the Asian Network? Their aim is to mainstream Asian programming – but that doesn’t mean everything on Asian Network has to be so mainstream that older British Asians – who pay taxes and pay the license fee – cannot listen to in their own language.”

    I don’t think that MixTogether wants all shows to be about mixed couples. Just more of a focus on them.

  9. Leon — on 11th May, 2009 at 6:44 pm  

    given that 10% of all married Asians had a spouse from a different ethnic group,

    What’s your source for this?

    Some Asians are racist. Just as some white people are racist. As are people of all ethnic groups. I don’t really see what is so wrong about complaining about this.

    Not all racists are equal though given we live in a white majority country…

  10. asian alan — on 11th May, 2009 at 7:01 pm  

    Mixtogether writes
    They have recently (24 April) aired calls from Asian people who have openly admitted being racist.

    So in Mixtogether argument he/she is citing the “all animals and traffic lights are racist guy”.

  11. marvin — on 11th May, 2009 at 7:31 pm  

    Not all racists are equal though given we live in a white majority country…

    What on earth is this supposed to mean?

  12. Ami tomakey bhalobashi ya Rucky — on 11th May, 2009 at 8:15 pm  

    Not all racists are equal though given we live in a white majority country…

    No, of course not. So Sylhetis who threaten to kill their own female relation, chase her and her paleface, non-Muslim husband around the East End, into Essex, up north and eventually out of the country are basically equal in racist terms to the that Blimpish ex-colonial who speaks of ‘darkies’.

    Encouraging people of all faiths who live in the UK to accept their daughters, especially, marrying out, is an extremely praiseworthy initiative and benefits everyone in the long run. If one 1000th of the race/diversity/multicult budget were devoted to highlighting interfaith/cultural/racial issues such as this it would be something.

  13. Amrit — on 11th May, 2009 at 8:15 pm  

    I am quite frankly appalled at Sunny and Leon’s reactions.

    It’s alright for the guys, eh?

    Sunny:

    that doesn’t mean everything on Asian Network has to be so mainstream that older British Asians – who pay taxes and pay the license fee – cannot listen to in their own language

    So, I take it that mixed-race couples aren’t taxpayers too, then? Maybe they want to listen in in their own language? Maybe such a move might help those who don’t want to be forced to choose between being ‘white’ and being ‘Asian’?

    Leon:

    Not all racists are equal though given we live in a white majority country…

    SIM.PLI.STIC.

    That is ALL that I am going to say. For now. Damn *shakes head*.

  14. Leon — on 11th May, 2009 at 8:54 pm  

    It’s alright for the guys, eh?

    You know damn well that’s not what I’m saying.

    As for your other comment, you telling me you don’t know how power works? How majorities marginalise and in some case oppress minorities. What kind of naive fucking world do you live in??

  15. Paul — on 11th May, 2009 at 9:03 pm  

    So, I take it that mixed-race couples aren’t taxpayers too, then? Maybe they want to listen in in their own language? Maybe such a move might help those who don’t want to be forced to choose between being ‘white’ and being ‘Asian’?

    What language do mixed-race couples speak? I thought they spoke English.

    The majority of the AN’s output is in English and is accessable to everyone.

    As for those who don’t want to be forced to choose between being ‘white’ and ‘Asian’, you may as well say Radio 1 is forcing them to choose being ‘white’ over ‘Asian’.

    I don’t really understand how such a programme would work in practice.

  16. MixTogether — on 11th May, 2009 at 9:40 pm  

    I wasn’t going to comment after Sunny’s outburst, but that was directed at me at least.

    Leon, I think your language towards Amrit is ungentlemanly and inexcusable. It speaks of very trashy standards on a blog that such comments are allowed to stand.

  17. Raven — on 11th May, 2009 at 10:08 pm  

    I agree with Rumbold’s and Mixtogether’s criticism’s of the reason’s given by AN by rejecting the show – it seems barking mad.

    However, as to having a show (and presumably we are talking about a regular show or series rather than an acceptable one-off?), what exactly would such a programme contain week after week which would merit it being aired on an Asian network? Certainly there are some very interesting issues involved (eg. the get-together, the parental objections, making a life together, ‘fushion’ lifestyle, children, their religion/culture etc.) but ‘mixed couples’ do not form a community – they have no shared history, language, culture, music, food etc. There’s no collective consciousness there, I don’t think. Each couple is so different unless we’re talking about the same combination of cultures and backgrounds. I guess one ‘benefit’ of such programmes on AN would be a lobbying of the older Asian generation, softening them up for if they had to face this in their own family. Also, there is something to be done about the statistic that mixed race/heritage children are one of the fastest growing groups in the country (I forget the actual stat.) but I’m not sure what, if anything.

    As a British-Punjabi woman married to a white English man, I’d prefer to keep as much Asian content as possible on AN (there’s little enough Brit-Asian content elsewhere), although I would be interested to see documentaries on ‘mixed couples’ documentaries elsewhere when they occurred.

    And I’d also be interested to know the source of the stat about 10% of Asians ‘marrying out’ – it seems high to me?

  18. Amrit — on 11th May, 2009 at 10:22 pm  

    Paul:

    Er, right. Well, you may want to address your comments to Sunny. Mixed-race couples, being ‘mixed-race’ often include at least one partner who doesn’t necessarily want to abandon the culture that’s familiar to them. That is what I was trying to say – why should ‘community language’ content be geared at older Asians exclusively? Sunny makes out that it is, or should be. I for one would like to discover views in Punjabi (whether heard, written or whatever) that aren’t stereotypical.

    Leon:

    I understand how power works, but to say not all racism is equally bad is both dangerous and stupid. Racism of all stripes needs to be condemned, and you talking about power doesn’t change that. South Asian communities are fucking suffocatingly secretive. In India, the issue of female infanticide is only now being openly acknowledged because of the massive gender imbalance, and because people can’t get married. Marriage being a public/community affair, the issue is now in the public domain and can’t be ignored any longer.

    It’s always been there, though, and always been appalling. Many Asians are well aware that their ethnic minority status frees them, to a great extent, from suspicion of racism. This shouldn’t be the case.

    Might I just say, as well, that I have seen a lot of ignorance/ignorance-based racism from white people, often as a result of lack of education. Yet many middle-class Asians who REALLY should ‘know better’ display similar attitudes towards blacks. I don’t think ‘equality’ comes into it. Sunny himself used to call out community leaders for their bigotry, encouraging modernisation. That was one of the things that marked PP out.

    Thanks Mixtogether, but I think you’d better duck under the parapet again. :-D

    Man, I feel like one of the most mature people here over this, and I’m younger than y’all. GIVE PEACE A CHANCE, Sunny! *juggles olive branches*

    Raven – maybe that’s the point. I think MT and his co-conspirators are hoping to help establish a sense of community for some mixed-race couples.

  19. Paul — on 11th May, 2009 at 10:26 pm  

    I’d prefer to keep as much Asian content as possible on AN (there’s little enough Brit-Asian content elsewhere)

    Asian Network is the best ‘Asian’ station out there. The variety of documentaries on social issues is exemplary. The programming is overwhelmingly mostly in English and accessible to everyone. It does more to advance British-Asian culture through promoting new music, literature, art, cinema and British Asian related talent than anything else in the country, giving it a platform at the BBC, to a multi-ethnic audience. It has Asian mixed-race presenters. It has a multi-ethnic staff. There is nowhere else that, say, Bollywood interviews exist side-by-side with the latest gossip from Eastenders in the same programme, whilst they play the latest hot british-bhangra music besides some Mariah Carey. It therefore represents in its marrow the very identity and mixed interests of British Asians and is highly accessible to non-Asians who want to listen to arts and music shows, talk shows, discussion programmes, and so on.

    It is, intrinsically, in its very fibres, mixed-culture and mixed-race. I am bemused by the campaign that seems to being launched against it.

    Mixed-race Asian life can be promoted holistically through the station in its existing programming and through occasional discussion programmes and documentaries. As part of the total variety and complexity of ‘Asian’ life in Britain. I fail to see why this warrants such vilification and anger.

  20. Paul — on 11th May, 2009 at 10:31 pm  

    mixed-race couples, being ‘mixed-race’ often include at least one partner who doesn’t necessarily want to abandon the culture that’s familiar to them. That is what I was trying to say – why should ‘community language’ content be geared at older Asians exclusively? Sunny makes out that it is, or should be. I for one would like to discover views in Punjabi (whether heard, written or whatever) that aren’t stereotypical.

    Non-English language programming represents a couple of hours in the evening. The rest of the programming is in English. This is going to diminish as time passes, because that ‘generation’ diminishes. But if there is someone who is in a mixed-race relationship that wants to keep in touch with that side of her culture, why would he or she not just listen to the normal programming? It doesn’t make sense.

  21. Sunny — on 11th May, 2009 at 10:35 pm  

    That is what I was trying to say – why should ‘community language’ content be geared at older Asians exclusively? Sunny makes out that it is, or should be. I for one would like to discover views in Punjabi (whether heard, written or whatever) that aren’t stereotypical.

    Amrit – this doesn’t even make sense! Do you actually listen to Asian Network or what? Are you saying that all punjabi voices on there are sterotpical right now?

    Or can a non-stereotypical voice not be provided only by someone who is in a mixed-race relationship?

    The argument being made here isn’t that punjabi language programming is sexist, is it? The argument being made is that there isn’t a show for mixed couples? How does that even entitle you to a show? What would the bloody show even be about?

    I don’t think that MixTogether wants all shows to be about mixed couples. Just more of a focus on them.

    Yes he does, and now the boy is throwing a hissy fit just because he’s not getting one. What is a show about mixed relationships supposed to be about anyway? That mixed couples go on there every week to talk about their experiences?

    Or is the argument now that having Gujarati programming on Asian Network is racist because it discriminates against whites?

    This thread is so absurd I’m struggling to understand what its point is.

  22. Paul — on 11th May, 2009 at 10:49 pm  

    What would the bloody show even be about?

    Basically in his document it would be a show that would be exclusively for mixed-race Asians in which song-lyrics are translated for non-Asian people and things like that.

  23. Sunny — on 11th May, 2009 at 10:54 pm  

    for mixed-race Asians in which song-lyrics are translated for non-Asian people and things like that.

    Damn, I knew there was a market for stuff like that somewhere. I’m not the only who yearns for Punjabi boliyan to be translated into English and re-recorded hey?!

  24. Paul — on 11th May, 2009 at 10:55 pm  

    I don’t think that MixTogether wants all shows to be about mixed couples. Just more of a focus on them

    He’d be better off working with the Asian Network making suggestions and being their friend and touchstone, appearing in programmes and so on, rather than launching a jihad against them because they turned down his programme proposal.

    The BBC Asian Network does not deserve to be vilified like that. It has taken more crap than any other radio station in the country from its very inception. First of all from right-wingers saying it was a terrible thing and an example of anti-white discrimination. Then from whoever disagrees with what is said in a documentary or discussion show, and believe me, they get armchair activists who have nothing better to do with their time bombarding them all the time. Then they had Lord Ahmed going to the Daily Mail saying the BBC Asian Network was a den of prejudice against Muslims and it was run by a Hindu/Sikh media mafia. And now this.

  25. Paul — on 11th May, 2009 at 11:00 pm  

    Damn, I knew there was a market for stuff like that somewhere

    Half the Asians listening don’t understand half the Punjabi or Hindi lyrics fully of the songs completely anyway!

    I can just see the headlines in the Daily Mail now:

    BBC Licence Fee Taxpayer Money Funding Indian Language Lessons on Airwaves!

    People just can’t win. Even having the slightest interest in ‘Asian’ culture marks you off as a wart on the fabric of society these days.

  26. Paul — on 11th May, 2009 at 11:20 pm  

    I wouldn’t be surprised if this chap goes the Lord Ahmed route and goes to the Daily Mail, with a tasty story of anti-white / anti-mixed race prejudice in the looney left multi-culti BBC. They have an axe bigger than an executioners axe to grind and play out their hostility to the BBC and ethnic minorities, with a whiff of ‘political correctness gone mad’ to it. Really, the Asian Network does not need this, and does not deserve this kind of non-measured criticism at all.

  27. qidniz — on 11th May, 2009 at 11:27 pm  

    Half the Asians listening don’t understand half the Punjabi or Hindi lyrics

    The classic model of assimilation calls for at last three generations, where the major mediating element is language. Thus, immigrants may never achieve full proficiency in the new language; the first generation native-born are bilingual; the second generation’s grasp of the old language is tenuous (e.g. enough to understand and converse with the grandparents); and the third generation have no real need to understand the old language as even their grandparents are fluent in the new.

    After 50 years or so, things seem to be into the second generation of this model by now.

  28. Leon — on 12th May, 2009 at 12:05 am  

    This thread is so absurd I’m struggling to understand what its point is.

    Yep.

    Amrit, you’re talking about this in a vacuum, in the real world things are quite different. It’s a shame you can’t see that, I have you wrong it appears.

  29. Raven — on 12th May, 2009 at 6:59 am  

    I think we need some amusement…getting dressed this morning, my four-year old son has just solemnly informed me that he’s “half Indian and whole English”. Discuss. (he didn’t say ‘discuss’).

    I see a programme here (really I do)…

  30. Rumbold — on 12th May, 2009 at 8:23 am  

    The stat comes from this:

    http://www.mixtogether.org/documents/mixtogetherproposalfinal.pdf (p. 12)

    The 2009 report ‘Ethnicity and family’ by the Equalities and Human Rights Commission identifies that this proportion has increased to around 10%.

    Leon:

    “Not all racists are equal though given we live in a white majority country.”

    I don’t understand. Are you saying we should ignore racism in Asian communities because there are still white racists out there? Do you really have to choose only one type of racism to oppose? Mixed-race/religious couples do experience racism. There’s no other word for it.

    I might have thought you just didn’t explain yourself clearly enough, if it wasn’t for this…

    “As for your other comment, you telling me you don’t know how power works? How majorities marginalise and in some case oppress minorities. What kind of naive fucking world do you live in??”

    Stop being so rude. It just demonstrates you don’t actually have a decent point to make on this matter.

    Thanks Raven.

    Sunny:

    “Yes he does, and now the boy is throwing a hissy fit just because he’s not getting one. What is a show about mixed relationships supposed to be about anyway? That mixed couples go on there every week to talk about their experiences?”

    Well, the show’s proposal is interesting, and doesn’t just focus on mixed couples. As I said, I didn’t have a problem with the rejection of it, but rather the false reasons for the rejection of it.

  31. Rumbold — on 12th May, 2009 at 8:26 am  

    Hahaha Raven.

  32. Ala — on 12th May, 2009 at 10:15 am  

    I don’t understand why there’s even a discussion about this. The issues raised by MixTogether are very important, are they not? If there aren’t a lot of mixed Asian marriages, surely that’s the whole point- it’s still a bit of a taboo that needs to be addressed, not for community or race relations purposes but for Asians themselves, particularly women.

  33. Ravi Naik — on 12th May, 2009 at 10:35 am  

    Not all racists are equal though given we live in a white majority country

    I really hope you do not believe that. A racist Asian who does not want her daughter to marry a black guy, is as a bad as a White parent under the same circumstances. If we want minorities to be treated as equals, we certainly need to have the same expectations when it comes to how they treat others.

    I do believe Asians are far more racist and insular than your average white. And I do not think we should excuse that by having two measures.

    On this topic, I do think that there are many types of mixed-relationships, and in my view the least problematic is race. I would consider mixed-religion and mixed-culture (European and non-European) to be more complex – but there have been several programs on mainstream channels dealing with that…

    On the whole, I disagree that this is a “niche” issue – it certainly is a British Asian issue. After all, British Asians (2nd gen onwards) certainly go through a phase of adapting their ancestral culture with a western one – which is not very different from having two parents with mixed background.

  34. The Common Humanist — on 12th May, 2009 at 12:03 pm  

    “Not all racists are equal though given we live in a white majority country”

    WTF? Do you really believe that? Racism is racism is racism, irrespective of the perpetrator, the victime etc.

    Reminds of when the Editor of The Voice declared that black people couldn’t be racist because ‘they were an oppressed minority’…….what utter tosh……so no need for personal responsibility then?

    And I must admit to being very surprised by the Sunny rant towards the top of the thread. Is Mr Hundal having a ‘Spike Lee Moment’* with respect to mix race relationships? Or is it previous with ‘MixTogether’?

    *He went through a phase when he was dead against

  35. Shamit — on 12th May, 2009 at 1:48 pm  

    “,…but to say not all racism is equally bad is both dangerous and stupid.”

    I thought Amrit was spot on when she made this comment.

    Racism is divisive wherever its ugly manifestations arise. And, those who claim themselves to be progressives must be ready to condemn racism in all its forms and manifestations. You don’t pick and choose –

  36. Sunny — on 12th May, 2009 at 3:24 pm  

    If there aren’t a lot of mixed Asian marriages, surely that’s the whole point- it’s still a bit of a taboo that needs to be addressed, not for community or race relations purposes but for Asians themselves, particularly women.

    Oh I completely agree with the fact that the taboo needs addressing. For personal reasons known to people close to Leon and I, and that includes Rumbold, we have no reason to oppose that.

    I’m just annoyed at the hissy fit that Mixtogrther is showing because he didn’t get his programme. Vijay Sharma, incidentally, is rubbish anyway. I’ve said for a while she needs to go.

    Lastly,

    “Not all racists are equal though given we live in a white majority country”

    WTF? Do you really believe that? Racism is racism is racism, irrespective of the perpetrator, the victime etc.

    There’s a danger that various arguments get conflated unnecessarily. Personal racism is abhorrent wherever you go – and I’d agree that an Asian being racist against blacks is the same as a white person being racist against someone black.

    There is also the concept of power and race – whereby institutions who wield significant power end up pushing agendas that aren’t explicitly racist, but will protect their interests over minorities, in what would ordinarily be racism.

    For example, I recently exposed the campaign to stop Aaqil Ahmed becoming head of religion at the BBC, a campaign run by various Christian lobby groups and aided by right-wing papers. That is bigotry, but not on an individual level but more establishment level. That is always lopsided against minorities.

  37. sonia — on 12th May, 2009 at 3:29 pm  

    Office of National Statistics has a section on the figures for ‘inter-ethnic’ marriage in the UK.

    Overall, only 2% of all marriages registered in the UK are classified as ‘inter-ethnic’. if you want to see a breakdown of figures for the various ethnic groups, check out the link

  38. sonia — on 12th May, 2009 at 3:34 pm  

    Can’t comment on this as i don’t listen to the bbc asian network and what they cover normally. they don’t have to have a special ‘channel’ do they to cover issues that are of increasing importance to the ‘community’. after all, i would have thought what all the different ‘asian communities’ have in common (or the elders anyway) is to ensure their kids don’t marry out! ( and race is hardly the only way of determining ‘in’ and ‘out’.) whether the programming content reflects this or not – would be interesting to know. (i.e. are we hiding this major aspect of our society under the carpet/how are we handling it) what is obvious is that the actual rates of ‘inter-marriage’ are low for all ethnic groups, but perhaps what’s interesting for ‘our communities’ is the obsession about ensuring their kids DON’t marry ‘out’. (however they define out)

    or – the wider obsession with marriage in general. all of which are good material for media analysis..

  39. sonia — on 12th May, 2009 at 3:42 pm  

    ravi rumbold etc. – good comments about upholding all individuals members of society to the same standards. leon – i hear what you are trying to get at, in my view you are talking about groups and institutions, and that’s fair enough, but at the core of it, if we do not expect all individuals to uphold the same standards, we are setting the scene for inequalities to continue.

    i’m not sure why this thread is going in the direction it is doing. where is this ‘hissy fit’ that mixtogether is supposed to be throwing? he’s just expressing some opinions. and yes, there are probably many ways of influencing what programming goes up on a network.

    and this business about covering issues that are relevant – you don’t need a ‘demographic’ representative to do this. you can cover it from all sorts of angles -e.g. i would consider an auntie turning up /phoning in saying she didnt want her son/daughter to marry xyz because of wvx, and that kicking of a discussion, relevant to the issue.

    chill, y’all. and anyway this isn’t about ‘holding’ up racism for the sake of it, i’d say its more about opening up discussion because a LOT of young asians are affected by our families expectations of interference in our lives. different people have different ways of dealing with this /different levels of conforming.

    The wider importatn point is though this links in very closely to mental health issues in ‘our community’ – no one addresses that element of it – and I for one think its pretty crucial. It is not only women who are forcibly married of/who are ‘chained to the sink’ who suffer from mental health issues because of their situation. if you are Having to choose between your family and future,that’s a tough call – and there is little support out there for those who make those decisions, and for those who are going through the process.

  40. sonia — on 12th May, 2009 at 3:44 pm  

    Basically we should have the Ashiq’s of this world on BBC asian network – expressing their views. the kind of stuff he always says ‘ oh once you leave your community, and things go wrong – who will support you’ – that he seems to say almost maliciously gleefully – well these are real issues for many many people.

  41. sonia — on 12th May, 2009 at 3:48 pm  

    Raven – you have an interesting point. the “collective consciousness” that you are talking about – is emerging – from people sharing adversity. i’ve met lots of young women who want to share their stories and their experiences with others who have been through similar issues – in fact only yesterday i was saying we need to get together some kind of mentoring/support network for people who’re having to deal with – quite serious – family/relationship issues. as you say, its not the same for everyone obviously – but there are significant commonalities for some. perhaps the point is -what needs recognition is that for people who grow up with certain societal expectations enforced upon them, letting go of those – involves a varying amount of stress/effort/ostracisation – which in turn – has varying levels of ramifications for a person’s life, mental health, sanity, and general quality of life.

  42. sonia — on 12th May, 2009 at 4:00 pm  

    Hmm, there’s no need for the aggressive tones i’m picking up on this thread..let’s play nicey nice everyone.

  43. sonia — on 12th May, 2009 at 6:29 pm  

    good points amrit in no. 18

  44. justforfun — on 13th May, 2009 at 12:31 pm  

    Amrit & Sonia – glad to see you still monitor this site for ‘ errors’and correct them with out fear or favour.

    Sonia – thanks for the link – interesting reading.

    justforfun

  45. Mr Smoking man — on 16th June, 2009 at 9:55 pm  

    I applaude Sunny, Hes the only one who speaks sense
    Mixed Marriage has been happening for years, soldiers for one have married other groups for years.

    The way it is potrayed is that the big bad asian world doesnt want their daughters marrying a white man. Thats all it is about when it comes to mixed together.

    The fact is, I know for a fact that mix together do not like people on their forum who go against the party line. Everyone follows one another on there. Reminds me of one of those american cults.
    Its more a parade of patheticness and the need to grow up. Its a harsh world just get used to it.

  46. kamran — on 15th August, 2009 at 7:25 pm  

    it is true that we were proude of the old asian network, we need a new line up and presentors and new programming; remove the saturday evening progs and have a family fun language extravagansta and of course where were independance india and pakistan programming and Ramadhan a joke yeah

    Amarjit Sidhu and Jay Patel and Mohammed Ayub Back–

  47. kamran — on 15th August, 2009 at 7:46 pm  

    it is true that we were proude of the old asian network, we need a new line up and presentors and new programming; remove the saturday evening progs and have a family fun language extravagansta and of course where were independance india and pakistan programming and Ramadhan a joke yeah

    Amarjit Sidhu and Jay Patel and Mohammed Ayub Back-

    could the BBc also include Traffic and travel and Live on air programs after 10pm-

    We are all fed up its a contionous air radio the same progs daily- a joke yeah

    Introduce with Soniya Dihol a langusge disscussion prog

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