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  • Technorati: graph / links

    Video reveals G20 police assault on man who died


    by Leon on 7th April, 2009 at 7:59 pm    

    This is not going away despite Police version of events. If this man’s death isn’t investigated properly and those responsible brought to justice I think we’ll see some very angry protests. You can view the footage here.

    Dramatic footage obtained by the Guardian shows that the man who died at last week’s G20 protests in London was attacked from behind and thrown to the ground by a baton–wielding police officer in riot gear. Moments after the assault on Ian Tomlinson was captured on video, he suffered a heart attack and died.

    The Guardian is preparing to hand a dossier of evidence to the police complaints watchdog.

    It sheds new light on the events surrounding the death of the 47-year-old newspaper seller, who had been on his way home from work when he was confronted by lines of riot police near the Bank of England.

    The submission to the Independent Police Complaints Commission (IPCC) includes a collection of testimonies from witnesses, along with the video footage, shot at around 7.20pm, which shows Tomlinson at Royal Exchange Passage.



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    61 Comments below   |   Add your own

    1. Bert Rustle — on 7th April, 2009 at 8:08 pm  

      How many non-participants were pushed over by the Police?

      How many participants were pushed over by the Police?

      How many Police Officers were pushed over by the participants?

    2. Katy Newton — on 7th April, 2009 at 8:45 pm  

      Oh please, this is no time for whataboutery. He wasn’t in the middle of a melee, he was clearly minding his own business. All he did was walk in front of the police, who were clearly not under attack themselves and had no reason to go anywhere near him, much less hit him with a stick and knock him over. They didn’t even help him up. I didn’t see any bricks being thrown or medics being impeded by a heaving mob, did you?

      I’m not generally kneejerk anti-police and I’m sure no one intended him to die, but I agree with Leon 100%. This is an absolute scandal.

    3. anonblogger — on 7th April, 2009 at 9:06 pm  

      This is not looking good for the police.

      Although in a way wouldnt it be wise to avoid the protest region in case the police mistake you for a anarchist.

    4. Silent Hunter — on 7th April, 2009 at 9:13 pm  

      What’s even more scandalous is the fact that the Met LIED THROUGH THEIR TEETH after the event - trying to claim that protestors had prevented them from helping the unfortunate victim, of their own thuggery.

      So now we know that they lied and were in fact responsible for a mans death.

      Welcome to The Labour Party’s Police State everyone.

      And to think that there are still 30% of the electorate willing to vote for the lying corrupt bastards.

      How do these people sleep at night?

    5. comrade — on 7th April, 2009 at 9:19 pm  

      Sunny, I like to thank you for standing up for the truce, I wonder how that Tory ever going to appear on PP again.

    6. DelBoy — on 7th April, 2009 at 10:06 pm  

      This is fucked up.

    7. Don — on 7th April, 2009 at 10:18 pm  

      Such casual fucking brutality in the broad light of day, swaggering with their dogs. Bastards.
      After all these years, still bastards.

    8. Trofim — on 7th April, 2009 at 10:24 pm  

      A policeman hit the man’s legs with a baton, pushed him, and he fell over. Therefore, the police were responsible for his death.

      So, you’re not only an expert forensic pathologist, but you’re also an expert in the theory of action, are you, Silent Hunter?

    9. Random Guy — on 7th April, 2009 at 10:35 pm  

      STFU Trofim, this is shocking by any standard, and horrific given the man died shortly after.

      As always, the only antidote to a good propaganda campaign is hard evidence. This video raises serious questions about protocol, and the laws that should be followed in these situations.

    10. JB86UK — on 7th April, 2009 at 10:39 pm  

      “So, you’re not only an expert forensic pathologist, but you’re also an expert in the theory of action, are you, Silent Hunter?”

      A dazed man is needlessly pushed over, and moments later has a heart attack, and you don’t think that constitutes causality? Would you like a double-blind trial?

      On Comment is Free they’ve got a good write-up on the press reaction to Ian Tomlinson’s death:

      http://www.guardian.co.uk/commentisfree/libertycentral/2009/apr/07/civil-liberties-g20-police-assault-ian-tomlinson?commentpage=4&commentposted=1

      In the comments below, Stephen Moss (Guardian staff) states:

      “When the Guardian offered this astonishing footage to the BBC News at 6, apparently the response was “No thanks, we’re not covering this, we see it as just a London story.” Great news sense down there at TV Centre.”

    11. Sid — on 7th April, 2009 at 10:44 pm  

      Trofim

      What are the chances that the man would have carried on walking down the road and not died of a heart attack had the policeman not knocked him over?

      We will have to wait for medical evidence that shows whether the victim’s heart attack was caused by the knock to the ground or not.

    12. DelBoy — on 7th April, 2009 at 10:46 pm  

      Fuck the BBC. Let them get sold off, and let the rags go under. Fuck ‘em for not reporting this. Seems like the Guardian is the only half-decent one left.

    13. DelBoy — on 7th April, 2009 at 10:47 pm  

      Man with heart condition gets beaten in the leg, stumbles, then gets pushed to the floor.

      Man staggers off, dazed.

      Fast forward a few minutes, said man dies of a heart attack.

      Does that make it any easier for you to understand, troll?

    14. Leon — on 7th April, 2009 at 10:57 pm  

      In the comments below, Stephen Moss (Guardian staff) states:

      “When the Guardian offered this astonishing footage to the BBC News at 6, apparently the response was “No thanks, we’re not covering this, we see it as just a London story.” Great news sense down there at TV Centre.”

      I couldn’t believe it when I read that. Anyone with half a brain cell can see this is going to be a real story…

      Fuck the BBC. Let them get sold off, and let the rags go under. Fuck ‘em for not reporting this.

      With you on that one. I’ve had it with the BBC and see no value in them being publicly funded. Let them swim the sharks I say…

    15. AntiCitizenOne — on 7th April, 2009 at 11:27 pm  

      You can now see why filming the police has been declared “a terrorist act”…

    16. douglas clark — on 7th April, 2009 at 11:32 pm  

      AntiCitizenOne,

      Yes, that’s got to be the first thing that gets changed. Right now.

    17. Silent Hunter — on 8th April, 2009 at 12:09 am  

      Trofim:

      I really don’t think there’s any necessity for me to add to the excellent comments dealing with your pitiful effort.
      Better to let you just bask in the knowledge of demonstrating your own stupidity to all, in a very public forum.

      Well done you! LOL

    18. Don — on 8th April, 2009 at 12:27 am  

      Even if he hadn’t died, it was still damning.

    19. Nyrone — on 8th April, 2009 at 1:48 am  

      This is truly disgusting a sight to behold, thank God it’s been caught on video camera for the world to see…

      I don’t know what I’m more angry about, the fact the police would act this way so viciously and arrogantly with total utter brutal indifference, like a typical bunch of yobs, or that ’someone’ has spread grotesque lies into the entire media substream that resulted in the rags proclaiming it was the protestors all throwing bottles and spitting whilst the nice, gentle policemen were trying to help the poor man..

      How many of them will fucking apologize for their blatant, disgusting lies and smears? Who is pushing these uncheckable, unverified lies into the media? someone help on this…

    20. halima — on 8th April, 2009 at 2:56 am  

      What Don said on 7.

    21. Golam Murtaza — on 8th April, 2009 at 5:12 am  

      Trofim and Bert Rustle. Defenders of freedom.

    22. Bert Rustle — on 8th April, 2009 at 6:42 am  

      Katy Newton 2 wrote … Oh please, this is no time for whataboutery. …

      In my opinion, the questions in Bert Rustle 1 are relevant. I would hazard a guess that there are several people in each category and that multiple video clips will now emerge demonstrating this, with relatively less coverage given to category three by the Drive-By Media.

      AntiCitizenOne 15 wrote … You can now see why filming the police has been declared “a terrorist act”…

      Which raises the question that if it is the case that this particular sequence of video was made illegally, would it be permissible evidence in court?

      Don 18 wrote … Even if he hadn’t died, it was still damning. …

      Agreed. Even if the immediately preceding events included said victim assaulting said officer, I would be astonished if said officer had not broken Police regulations.

      Of course it might be illuminating to see any preceding video.

      Are we now to expect rioting in the streets?

    23. DelBoy — on 8th April, 2009 at 6:57 am  

      So much for not living in a police state:

      http://www.guardian.co.uk/commentisfree/2009/feb/27/freedom-of-information-straw

    24. Tom — on 8th April, 2009 at 7:13 am  

      “I wonder how that Tory ever going to appear on PP again.”

      To be fair, the first radio news bulletin I heard today had a robust comment from one I. Dale, described as a ‘political reporter’, condemning the police action. I’m not sure many politicians are going to defend the police on the basis of this, although the usual ‘bad apples…mostly went off well…thorough investigation…thoughts are with the family’ stuff will get rolled out. Don’t get taken in.

    25. Trofim — on 8th April, 2009 at 7:21 am  

      If you peruse medico-legal literature, you will find numerous examples where death was not due to what appeared to be obvious causes. Only if all evidence, including premorbid and post-mortem medical findings indicate causality, can this conclusion be accepted. And even if there turns out to be a causal link between the push and the ultimate cause of death, it does not follow that the proposition “the police did it” is true. Christ, how frighteningly susceptible to groupthink the PP crowd are. God help us if any of them were called up for jury service. If the line of reasoning in my initial sentence is valid, then so would be “A Muslim hit the man’s legs with a baton, pushed him, and he fell over. Therefore, the Muslims were responsible for his death”.

    26. Dave S — on 8th April, 2009 at 7:21 am  

      Bert Rustle @ 1: What’s your point? Do any of your questions make it OK for the police to kill somebody? No, they do not. So please stop muddying the waters with excuses for a bunch of state-sponsored murdering thugs caught right in the act.

      Trofim @ 8: I’m sure the police sleep easy at night knowing that however many people they beat up, traumatize for life, or kill, there will always be despicable fascists like you around applauding their actions.

      Undoubtedly you don’t need to worry about the same thing ever happening to you, since it’s obvious you’re so blind to the oppression of the state that you’ll never feel the need to protest about anything. Although nowadays, even being an innocent bystander (albeit one with precious little humanity or compassion) doesn’t guarantee your safety - so watch your back.

      AntiCitizenOne @ 15: Good point!

      Nyrone @ 19: The point is, this type of violence from the police is commonplace, it really is! I’ve really only been on a handful of protests in my life (at a guess ten), but during those, I have seen the police doing this kind of thing more times than I care to remember. I have friends who still have problems with arms that were been broken by the police, for nothing more than being at a protest!

      Institutionally, they have zero respect for the right to protest, and are an affront to anything which can be called “democracy”.

      I’m sick to death of police violence, intimidation and downright illegal behaviour towards protesters being ignored and excused.

      People sometimes look at me as if I’m insane when I point out that we already live in a totalitarian fascist police state, and I even cringe when I say those words because they instantly summon up images of conspiracy theorists and moaning hippies. But what else can you actually call it!?!?

      We may not be “as bad as China” or whatever, in that we don’t have mobile execution trucks driving around and killing people 14 minutes after they have been sentenced.

      However, I honestly believe that the totalitarian nature of Britain is almost as severe, but camouflaged in a lot more subtlety. Where the British public will not accept straight-up brutality (or where European law forbids it), instead we are subjected to a much more psychological approach. For example…

      My own story:

      Just over a year ago, my partner (who was pregnant at the time) was arrested for her part in a small and peaceful protest outside the offices of an energy company, in which she and another guy locked themselves to the doors of this office for around three hours in the early morning.

      She was told (recorded on video and audio) that if she unlocked and left by 10am, she would not be arrested.

      At 9:50am, she unlocked herself, and was promptly arrested. Time on the arrest record: 9:56am. This was her first ever brush with the police - no previous arrests or criminal record.

      Now, while I’m sure idiots like Trofim will be rubbing their hands with glee at the thought of protesters being arrested and intimidated, please think about this a bit.

      A pregnant woman with no criminal record, involved in a non-violent, peaceful protest makes a deal with the police and goes out of her way to make sure she complies with it, yet is promptly arrested.

      Not only that, but during the nine hours that she was held in the cells (with a seriously traumatised cold-turkey heroin addict losing his mind in the next cell), our house was raided by a team of seven police for a grand total of about three minutes.

      Yes, three minutes.

      In fact, they even let themselves in, using the key which had been signed for and sealed in her personal belongings when she was checked into the cells, and she had no idea about the raid until I told her about it after her release.

      I was in at the time, and contrary to my rights, was confined to the kitchen (ie. illegally imprisoned) and not allowed to observe or document the raid in any way whatsoever. Besides, how could one person watch seven who are busily turning a house over as fast as possible?

      Now, despite the agreement made by the police (recorded by us and videoed by them), and multiple invitations to drop the case, they still pursued it to court. Not only that, but there were over five months in which they could have taken it to court before we had our baby.

      But no, instead, they dragged a new mother and her four-month old baby to court, only for the CPS to drop the case on the day by presenting “no evidence” in light of the police’s own video evidence which documented the agreement!

      The magistrates were “angry” and gave the CPS a slap on the wrist, but for the moment that’s all - although we are pursuing it further.

      So for the most minor of peaceful protests, you’ve got an unlawful arrest, an illegal (and deliberately intimidatory and heavy-handed “make the neighbours wonder what the hell is going on”) house raid, and a malicious, spurious prosecution of a young mother.

      I wasn’t the one arrested, but let me tell you - I’ve been mugged twice (beaten up a bit one of those times). The amount of stress and upset this entire police affair caused us was infinitely more than my two muggings combined - off the scale, by comparison.

      Incidentally, I still occasionally wake up with flashbacks from the first time I got mugged. Our treatment at the hands of the police scares me a lot more.

      We are nobodies really - a couple of people who really care about the environment and occasionally protest because we want to live in a safer, fairer world with some kind of future ahead of humanity. Is that a crime?

      If this is how the police treated us (and are as yet unpunished for), then I dread to think of all the other abuses they get away with, day in day out.

      Having witnessed the police first hand beating other protesters, and seen the injuries inflicted on my friends for nothing more than being at protests (another friend: 60 year old man standing still on the pavement, hospitalised several years ago by police who gave him a broken hip which he’s still struggling with today), it’s not surprising that somebody died.

      Is it any wonder that I seriously dislike the police?

      Or rather, if a gang of thugs and bullies intimidated and beat up your friends on a fairly regular basis, how would you feel about it?

      We are already living in a fascist country, where the government and large corporations are in cahoots with each other, and where many innocent, peaceful people are beaten for daring to stand up against it.

      It’s no wonder violence sometimes erupts, because peaceful protest has been attacked to the point where even if you are a pacifist - hell, even if you are a fucking bystander - the police have no qualms whatsoever in shoving you around, “kettling” you, and sometimes beating the shit out of you.

      Silent Hunger @ 4: The same happened under the Conservatives. I suspect it would still happen, only probably to a lesser degree, under the LibDems or Greens.

      Large multinational companies are more powerful than governments, and are not going away any time soon, so much needed changes will be vetoed wherever corporations can exert enough leverage. It doesn’t make any difference who is in government.

      So in light of this, I don’t really know why ANYBODY votes, because it doesn’t make any fucking difference who you vote for.

      The corporations control the state = fascism, 100%.

    27. cjcjc — on 8th April, 2009 at 7:51 am  

      Fuck the BBC. Let them get sold off, and let the rags go under. Fuck ‘em for not reporting this. Seems like the Guardian is the only half-decent one left.

      Sky was leading with this story from early evening.

      I don’t think it’s helpful to shout “murder”.

      The incident and subsequent “confusion” are bad enough as it is.

      But heads won’t roll, will they.
      They didn’t over De Menezes FFS; they hardly will over this.

    28. Trofim — on 8th April, 2009 at 7:54 am  

      Blimey, Dave S - we must speak different languages. Could you kindly indicate which portions of my posts correspond to “applauding their actions”?

    29. cjcjc — on 8th April, 2009 at 7:55 am  

      The corporations control the state = fascism, 100%.

      If we are living under “fascism, 100%”, what’s the number for North Korea? 500%?

      Thankfully none of us - yourself included - has any idea what it is to live under genuine oppression.
      Which obviously doesn’t mean we shouldn’t fight to keep the freedoms we still have.

    30. Bert Rustle — on 8th April, 2009 at 8:17 am  

      Dave S 28 wrote … we already live in a totalitarian fascist police state …

      The laws are largely in place for this, many originating from the EU. In my opinion we already live in a totalitarian fascist Thought Police state.

      Dave S 28 wrote … We are already living in a fascist country, where the government and large corporations are in cahoots with each other …

      I agree. William K. Black, author of The Best Way to Rob a Bank Is to Own One: How Corporate Executives and Politicians Looted the Savings & Loan Industry is interviewed on video by PBS (akin to a BBC of the USA) regarding the industrial scale fraud within the Ruling Class which has precipitated the current financial situation: http://www.pbs.org/moyers/journal/04032009/watch.html

      This is the only program I have seen which in clear and measured terms sets out the situation. In my opinion.

      You could not make it up and you should not pass it up:

      …The financial industry brought the economy to its knees, but how did they get away with it? With the nation wondering how to hold the bankers accountable, Bill Moyers sits down with William K. Black, the former senior regulator who cracked down on banks during the savings and loan crisis of the 1980s. Black offers his analysis of what went wrong and his critique of the bailout …

      It lasts 28 minutes.

      Dave S 28 wrote … Large multinational companies are more powerful than governments, and are not going away any time soon, so much needed changes will be vetoed wherever corporations can exert enough leverage. …

      They are not more powerful than the Electorate, at least an armed one, as in the USA.

      Dave S 28 wrote … It doesn’t make any difference who is in government. …

      There has only been the Establishment Party in power since WWII. The various factions proclaim their unique differences whilst promoting each others policies, as in traditional policy of faction X is the new policy of faction Y and vice versa.

    31. Rumbold — on 8th April, 2009 at 8:50 am  

      This is a disgrace.

    32. fugstar — on 8th April, 2009 at 9:23 am  

      Why are people so prone to believing the make-believe official version of events? Shame on them for being so weak, and those whose callousness caused this death.

    33. Bert Rustle — on 8th April, 2009 at 9:30 am  

      If a Police dog bites me and I injure or kill it in my defence, am I committing an offence?

    34. Bert Rustle — on 8th April, 2009 at 9:39 am  

      More video: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SYM3KOByTDw&fmt=18

    35. Sid — on 8th April, 2009 at 9:40 am  

      If you bite the Police dog, you possibly are.

    36. Bert Rustle — on 8th April, 2009 at 9:53 am  

      Ruff!

    37. Sid — on 8th April, 2009 at 10:06 am  

      If you peruse medico-legal literature, you will find numerous examples where death was not due to what appeared to be obvious causes. Only if all evidence, including premorbid and post-mortem medical findings indicate causality, can this conclusion be accepted.

      It’s a good thing you mentioned this at #27. Because from your comment at #2, anyone would think you made the second statement to cover up the perception that you’re keen to pre-judge the situation without any evidence yourself.

      What no one here can see is the point where Tomlinson’s fall to the ground may have resulted in a concussion to the head, because that point is off-camera.

    38. Leon — on 8th April, 2009 at 10:10 am  

      Why are people so prone to believing the make-believe official version of events? Shame on them for being so weak, and those whose callousness caused this death.

      Because of the reach and power of the mass media and those in the political class that are complicit. The reason why social media is important is it democratises documenting and distribution of events/information.

      If the mainstream aren’t doing a good enough job it’s up to the rest of us to make up the difference.

    39. Bert Rustle — on 8th April, 2009 at 10:28 am  

      Leon 39 wrote … Because of the reach and power of the mass media and those in the political class that are complicit. … If the mainstream aren’t doing a good enough job it’s up to the rest of us to make up the difference. …

      I agree. Down with all bookburners as well.

    40. damon — on 8th April, 2009 at 11:08 am  

      As aggressive and needlesly violent as the policeman who knocked down Ian Tomlinson was, I hope that that there will be wider focus on the police tactics on the day, and how shoving and hitting peaceful people was commonplace last wednesday.
      I rang up BBC London radio on sunday night (on Eddie Nestor’s show) and mentioned on air, the YouTube clip I had seen (after Dave Bones had done a link to it on this website) of riot police assaulting peaceful people at the (so called) Climate Camp in Bishopsgate in the evening as it got dark.
      I’d like to see the officer who gave the order to start that assault, be shown that five minute film, and be questioned about what was actually happening on the ground.

      I never said this on the radio - (but should have) - at one point one of the riot policemen is holding his riot shield at 90 degrees to the ground (in a horizontal position), and whacking someone on the upper body (or neck or face) with its rim.
      While the climate camp people were offering no resistance. (In fact holding their hands up and chanting ”no violence”).
      There could have been several people who got hurt or fell ill because of the police’s draconian tactics that day.
      Maybe the crusties have to take some blame too.
      They give the police the excuse to behave like that.

    41. dave bones — on 8th April, 2009 at 11:16 am  

      Obviously this is a tragedy which anticapitalists shouldn’t take advantage of as this guy was not part of the protest. It is a shame that it has taken this to highlight that the London guys have been going over the top for many years. They feel they can do what the fuck they like. No one will be disciplined.

      One of the Policemen involved in “Clearing the Climate Camp” (see other video doing the rounds) blogs here. Maybe it would be some use trying to debate all this and reach an understanding with him.

      There is little point me doing so as I am “known” to them although I have never been violent as I don’t agree with violence.

    42. MaidMarian — on 8th April, 2009 at 11:57 am  

      Sid (11) - ‘We will have to wait for medical evidence that shows whether the victim’s heart attack was caused by the knock to the ground or not.’

      Why?

      From the look of the court of internet opinion everyone’s made their mind up without the wait.

    43. Rumbold — on 8th April, 2009 at 12:06 pm  

      The video reveals a number of things:

      1. We cannot tell from that whether he was a protestor or not, but we can see that he was walking unaturally slowly in front of the police.

      2. He did not attempt to attack the police, or behave in such a way that justified their assault.

      3. The push did not immediatly cause a heart attack, but was very likely to have been a contributing factor.

    44. Sid — on 8th April, 2009 at 12:12 pm  

      Why?
      From the look of the court of internet opinion everyone’s made their mind up without the wait.

      Because there might be a discrepancy between opinion and evidence. But you already know that. Don’t you?

    45. chairwoman — on 8th April, 2009 at 12:17 pm  

      Why is anybody surprised?

      Although, like Katy, I don’t have a knee jerk reaction to the police (let’s face it, we all go them if our children go missing, or we’re burgled or attacked), and a lot of the time they do stuff that nobody wants to do, but has to be done.

      But they treat demonstrations like a boys’ day out, they’re kitted up and psyched up, and go out wanting to kick some demonstrators’ butts.

      The late Chairman had a very jaundiced view of the constabulary, and made up this little rhyme.

      Their job is to nick you
      They do it with glee
      They’ll nick everybody
      They’ll nick you and me

      And that pretty well sums up their mindset.

    46. damon — on 8th April, 2009 at 12:37 pm  

      One thing I thought was funny from this tragic story, was a comment made on the website ”Letters from a Tory” which said this:

      ”1. The video said Ian Tomlinson was “attempting to get home from work” - oh, really? So he just happened to be wearing plain clothes and accidentally found himself in front of a police cordon that was clearing the area of protestors during a mass gathering around the G20 summit? Please, don’t insult our intelligence. This was nothing more than a deliberate attempt to portray Ian as an innocent bystander when in reality he was very much part of the protest.”
      http://www.lettersfromatory.com/2009/04/08/g20-protest-death-was-not-as-simple-as-the-left-portray/

      I don’t know much of the small detail about who the man who died was (did he work in a newsagents, or sell the Evening Standard at a booth?)

      I just found the thing about him being in ”plain clothes” amusing. I too work in The City (as a van driver) and I wear those ”plain clothes” of boots, jeans and sweatshirt too.

      Maybe the Tory just looks straight through us when he sees us workers amongst ‘his kind’ during the working week in The City.

      (Having brought sound and light equipment up to a HSBC meeting one evening recently - I couldn’t get over how well groomed the wine quaffing bankers (waiting for the presentation to start) were.
      ”Wow” I thought (looking jealously at some of the wavey thick pampered hairstyles that many of the men sported) - ”it’s all right for some”.

    47. Golam Murtaza — on 8th April, 2009 at 12:41 pm  

      Well spotted Damon. I’ll now know better than to commit the terrible, subversive sin of walking around in “plain clothes” when there are police around.

    48. chairwoman — on 8th April, 2009 at 12:58 pm  

      Is there a newspaper seller’s uniform?

      What does it consist of? I need to be sure of my newsagent’s credentials, as I would hate to find myself purchasing my newspapers and magazines from a subversive undercover chap.

    49. leon — on 8th April, 2009 at 1:08 pm  

      Ignore LFAT the guy is an idiot.

    50. Trofim — on 8th April, 2009 at 1:17 pm  

      #43 1. We cannot tell from that whether he was a protestor or not, but we can see that he was walking unaturally slowly in front of the police.

      The World at One said that he was hurrying home - to catch up with the football or something football related. He didn’t appear to have the demeanour of a hurrying man to me. It appears to me that he had a slightly wide-based gait - the gait of someone who does not feel altogether steady on their feet.

    51. fugstar — on 8th April, 2009 at 1:19 pm  

      38.

      erm.. thank god for camera phones…

    52. cjcjc — on 8th April, 2009 at 4:51 pm  

      Their job is to nick you
      They do it with glee
      They’ll nick everybody
      They’ll nick you and me

      Though of course not the two kids who terrorised their neighbourhood and ended up nearly committing murder…

    53. marvin — on 8th April, 2009 at 5:57 pm  

      Fuck the BBC. Let them get sold off, and let the rags go under. Fuck ‘em for not reporting this.

      With you on that one. I’ve had it with the BBC and see no value in them being publicly funded. Let them swim the sharks I say…

      Aww, hell hath no fury like a liberal-lefty scorned. You think you’re outrage will change anything? Millions of license fee payers have felt ignored for years. You (liberal-left) supported them unwaveringly for years. Why? Well one could speculate they were generally in agreement with the liberal-left commenteriat.

      The BBC have realised that the Tories will be in power and the country are fed up with Labour and pretty much any policy they come up with. So forgive them if they don’t come running and panting to your every whim.

      This new flog ‘em approach to the BBC, by ‘lefties’, and many on PP strikes me as extremely bitchy. Not only that make you look shallow; shallow fair-weather friends, of the most respected and established media corporation in the world. With friends like you…

      That’s not to say the BBC doesn’t need reform but the way socialists DelBoy and Leon bang on you’d think the BBC had murdered their family. I’ve plenty of gripes, have done for years.

    54. marvin — on 8th April, 2009 at 6:09 pm  

      I think we should hold fire until the IPCC come to a conclusion. I agree with Rumbold, this is a disgrace. Also that you can only draw a limited number of conclusions from the evidence available. The wider issue of police conduct does need to come under review.

    55. constableconfused — on 8th April, 2009 at 6:25 pm  

      Just testing the water as to if I am tinned meat before joining the debate.

      Regards.

    56. constableconfused.com — on 8th April, 2009 at 6:31 pm  

      Just testing whether or not I will be classed as tinned meat.

      Regards.

    57. Shamit — on 8th April, 2009 at 6:57 pm  

      This is an abomination. I disagreed with Sunny when he wrote the first post about police behaviour - He was absolutely right and I was very wrong.

      This year it has come out that SIS has been involved in torture and now police brutality. Not good for our image when we try to preach virtues of civil society.

      Its time to revisit some recent legislation such as not allowing people to photograph police and enabling police to use terror legislation for people drawing on the pavement.

      The police officer involved should be charged with assault and sacked but does our thief ooops sorry Home Secretary have the authority to demand that from the Met.

    58. Shamit — on 8th April, 2009 at 7:00 pm  

      And Marvin’s point about the lacking of convictions on many a flag bearer of the liberal cause is very true.

      I remember Andrew stupid Gilligan being made to be a hero along with Piers Morgan when they literally made up stuff — these were done by so called liberals (loony left in my book).

      BBC refused to call terrorists by that phrase for a long time — the loonies must have agreed with the BBC stance then.

    59. DisgustedOfTunbridgeWells — on 8th April, 2009 at 7:28 pm  

      Aww, hell hath no fury like a liberal-lefty scorned. You think you’re outrage will change anything? Millions of license fee payers have felt ignored for years. You (liberal-left) supported them unwaveringly for years. Why? Well one could speculate they were generally in agreement with the liberal-left commenteriat.

      The good ol’ ‘raised floor’ gambit, bit tired now, surely ?

      Next up - why mad mel is a trotskyite self hating jew.

    60. dave bones — on 8th April, 2009 at 9:10 pm  

      I think rather than use the death of John Charles and now Mr Tomlinson politically it is a good idea to make sure something happens. I know Brian Visiondanz and King Arthur Pendragon were involved in changing attitudes to Stonehenge which has a very serious history of violence with the Police which seems to be over. We haven’t got a festival back yet but I don’t think anyone thinks fighting is the way forward anymore.

      I wonder if we could draft them in. Neither of them were in anyway responsible for whatever could go wrong at stonehenge. Nor could they be amongst anarchists, but I think it is time to have representatives of those who want change to happen to meet regularly with those in charge of riot police in London.

      I know there have been some very successful Mayday protests in the past. Obviously people who believe we should smash things wouldn’t have the same definition of success as I would. I have heard one of those in charge (always look for the guys with the blue clipboards) come by and say it had been nice working with people, and this was the year after the Met had first used “The Kettle”.

      Mayday organisers counteracted the kettle by not defining the protest as one location. Everyone took groups of Police for walks around London. I walked around pissed with my devil mask which was technically two things I could have been arrested for in a section 60 (?I think). But although I scared the life out of a few children I wasn’t stopped by any Police. I think there was a small riot in Soho in the evening.

      Take a look at the BBCs award winning Stonehenge doco

      A few people critisized Brian for working with the Police, I just think he is really good at this.

    61. douglas clark — on 8th April, 2009 at 9:19 pm  

      Constableconfused,

      Looks like you are clear of the dreaded spambot. Only the commentators to worry about now.



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