Hindu group calls to burn down Kellogs


by Sunny
8th March, 2006 at 8:47 pm    

Not really, but some of them are really angry. Why, you ask? What did poor Snap, Crackle and Pop (pictured) ever do to hurt anyone? Or did someone get incensed after finding that Special K was absolutely crap as part of a healthy diet? Actually it’s more mundane than that.

The World Council of Hindus (aka the VHP) are pissed off after finally finding out that some Kellogs products contained beef / pork gelatine. It is “outraged” according to a statement I’ve received, and their representative said so on the Asian Network this afternoon.

Bastards! – a fellow vegetarian like me might think. Except the products already state they contain gelatine (no more (pop) tarts for you Gujrati uncleji!) and are “not suitable for vegetarians”. The VHP want better labelling, Kellogs say they can’t be asked. So those who do not read their food labels closely – you have been warned.
File under: ‘Another religious body trying to stir controversy to get noticed‘.


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32 Comments below   |  

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  1. DesiPundit »

    [...] Sunny at Pickled Politics explains why the World Council of Hindus is angry at Kellogs. [...]


  2. Global Voices Online »

    [...] Food Labels get a Hindu group a little angry. Kellogs at the receiving end says Pickled Politics. [...]




  1. Al-Hack — on 8th March, 2006 at 9:28 pm  

    VHP are comedy every time they speak. Surprised they didn’t blame a global Muslim conspiracy behind Kellogs.

  2. Refresh — on 8th March, 2006 at 9:44 pm  

    What I want to know is how that hell does beef/pork or any other type of gelatine get into ANY Kellogs products?

    Or is it an early April 1st?

    If true – enough to put you off any processed foods – back to wholesome curries as mum makes them.

  3. raz — on 8th March, 2006 at 9:59 pm  

    I’m suprised the bombing of a Hindu temple yesterday hasn’t been mentioned on PP.. Let’s hope we don’t see any riots this time.

    http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/south_asia/4782618.stm

  4. Don — on 8th March, 2006 at 10:01 pm  

    Is raz J0nz?

    Or a satirist?

  5. raz — on 8th March, 2006 at 10:03 pm  

    Huh?

  6. Jai — on 8th March, 2006 at 10:53 pm  

    =>”some Kellogs products contained beef / pork gelatine.”

    It’s 1857 all over again ! Those dastardly Britishers, twirling their moustaches villainously……

    “Mangala Mangala Mangala Mangala Mangala Mangala Hoooooohhhh*…..”

    *In-joke for Asians on PP, along with any non-Asian fans of Hindi films.

  7. Geezer — on 8th March, 2006 at 11:15 pm  

    Looooooooooooooool nice one ^^^^

  8. David T — on 8th March, 2006 at 11:45 pm  

    Back to your barracks, you mischievous sepoys!

    How many time do I have to tell you?

    WE USE WD40 NOWADAYS

  9. El Cid — on 8th March, 2006 at 11:57 pm  

    Any one like Soy Sauce?

  10. Sunny — on 9th March, 2006 at 12:00 am  

    Heh! The 1857 reference didn’t even occur to me, but well spotted Jai!

    Raz – Am waiting for more concrete news on who was behind it, rather than adding to the rumour mill where everyone starts off by slagging each other off..

  11. jamal — on 9th March, 2006 at 12:05 am  

    lol.. this is quite amusing. It is on the packet so there is no excuse.

  12. squared — on 9th March, 2006 at 12:12 am  

    Sunny dearest, did you recently have work experience at The Sun?

    You have got to quit with the tabloid headlines!

  13. Soultrain — on 9th March, 2006 at 12:44 am  

    This is an issue that has affected me as a Hindu living in the UK and still continues to do so. From very young, I found out that gelatine was a beef product and being a Hindu (not a strict follower by any means as there are plenty of Hindus that don’t think its an issue anyway), all of a sudden it was ruling out a colossal number of food products (and drinks!)…Smarties, Cheese & Onion crisps, even chicken pieces, mayonaisse and Chocolate milkshakes contained gelatine in them – you’d be heavily surprised in what products you’d intuitively think had no beef or pork products in them, actually contained them in some form. Although setting me up for looking a bit of a plum on this board, I’ll admit I often go through a stage where I would frequently scan all the products I buy just to make sure I wasn’t inadvertently gonna consume any beef products – even when I’m just buying a quick snack.

    Speaking from a UK or a Western world perspective, this is something that makes life challenging for the many Muslims and Hindus, living in the UK/western world who try to observe their dietary restrictions, but find it difficult when so many innocent products have the offending ingredients sneakily put into them, and when you find out about it, you feel like crap. The same thing about McDonalds including beef fat in their chips in the US a while back, which sparked controversy back then.

    The way I see it, that ultimately living in the Western World, food manufacturers should have the right to make edible food products as they see fit – and we shouldn’t go round saying they shouldn’t use gelatine in their products as they are against our religion…it is not against the religion or faith of many others, who would rather eat that food, and it should be up to us as Hindus or Muslims to make ourselves aware of what we eat, when we consume food in the Western World. Many of us find out the hard way, coz we foolishly place belief that when for example we eat a chicken piece, or drink a milkshake, it doesn’t contain beef or pork when it does.

    So the key thing here is that we should be trained up to understand that, and indeed food labelling should mark it clear what kind of underhand products you wouldn’t expect it contains.

    Ironically, I believe the Rice Krispies box in the UK is suitable for vegetarians…and for some reason its not in India?!

    And this makes two points; the first about food labelling in India maybe being not as clear cut as that in the UK – I stand corrected if otherwise. In the UK, nut allergies and vegetarian dietary requirements has forced the labelling to be more clear, and makes us more aware of what we eat.

    Second point, it shows a lack of understanding and respect from the big companies who want to capture a big market like India and do almost anything to make their money, even if its selling food products in a country where the dominant faith does not allow it; basically using the same sales direction in the Western World, and applying in a different country with no basic research about peoples cultures or lives. But this has happened many times before.

    I believe that far from organising the standard controversy, the VHP should engineer an audit of all food and drink products that commonly on sale, so that it can take productive action in advising people what contains beef products…and let everyone else seek the information (if they wish to avoid beef products) and decide whether they buy them or not. If Hindus buy them even after having access to that information, then that’s their choice, and if they choose to boycott products en masse, then the manufacturers will actually have to do some research and sell people what they actually want.

  14. Sunny — on 9th March, 2006 at 1:06 am  

    Soultrain – I believe the good people from Iskon have a list somewhere that marks out the major food products that contained ‘banned’ products.

    I hear you on the general issue though, and frankly being a vegetarian its worse for me… I avoid gelatine too. But I think the safe option is always to quickly scan for the ‘Suitable for Vegetarians’ logo. I do that even with Muesli! You can never be too sure.

    Squared – heheh :$

  15. j0nz — on 9th March, 2006 at 7:19 am  

    Sunny

    Raz – Am waiting for more concrete news on who was behind it, rather than adding to the rumour mill where everyone starts off by slagging each other off..

    The BBC has the answer! …. It was…. Militants!

  16. j0nz — on 9th March, 2006 at 7:19 am  
  17. Jay Singh — on 9th March, 2006 at 9:22 am  

    jOnz

    If you have any knowledge of India’s recent history you would know that Muslim extremists who perpetrate this kind of act do a dance of deafh with Hindu extremists who have a habit of going on the rampage and slaughtering hundreds or thousands of Muslims in response.

  18. Steve M, BSc Reading (failed). — on 9th March, 2006 at 11:29 am  
  19. j0nz — on 9th March, 2006 at 12:00 pm  

    Jay Singh, I am well aware of that. My point is the bias in the BBC.

    It seems that when the perpetrators are not Muslim, they have no qualms about pointing out the person was Christian or Hindu, however when a Muslim or Islam is involved they become Those Who Cannot Be Named.

    Some off the cuff examples:

    Clearly in the title it’s a Hindu militant
    http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/world/south_asia/4146452.stm

    They state early on when a Christian is involved, but not so when a Muslim is involved
    http://drunkenblogging.blogspot.com/2006/02/islamic-broadcasting-company.html

    The only other explanation apart from BBC’s twisted PC attitude is that it’s only worth mentioning, i.e. a surprise if it’s a non-Muslim. But I’m not so sure about that explanation.

  20. j0nz — on 9th March, 2006 at 12:38 pm  

    Ok well BBC have change the linked article in #16.

    Documented here

    It’s just made me laugh at the title, Militants Responsible. It’s like no shit sherlock. And if it were Hindu or Christian militants, I have more than a sneaking susicpion this would be in the title or in the first paragraph.

  21. Sunny — on 9th March, 2006 at 1:01 pm  

    j0nz – that is because you either see it as a Muslim perpetrated crime when there is no proof, or you think that the religion is a factor when it isn’t. But then we’re all used to your madness by now :)

  22. j0nz — on 9th March, 2006 at 1:10 pm  

    Well we’ll see how the BBC reports it when the facts are known!

  23. K — on 9th March, 2006 at 2:03 pm  

    Wow, j0nz, I don’t know where you get the idea that the BBC never mentions when terrorism is motivated by Islam. I’ve always rather got the opposite impression. The example you have linked to is selective at best.

  24. j0nz — on 9th March, 2006 at 2:57 pm  

    Yeah it’s well known that the BBC is biased against Islam! Well if you’re the MCB or further to the extremist end.

    I’d feel better if you could point out some counterexamples, K?

  25. Jai — on 9th March, 2006 at 5:07 pm  

    One of the most unintentionally funny things on this post is the fact that some the automated adverts now display Google links to sites delivering “Pork Scratchings” and recipes for “Pork Roasts”.

    You have to laugh ;)

    “We will have our freedom, even if it takes a hundred years.”

    All-together now : “Allahabaaaaaaaad !!!!”

    (Jai defiantly grooms imaginary moustache.)

  26. Vikrant — on 10th March, 2006 at 5:13 am  

    Raz – Am waiting for more concrete news on who was behind it, rather than adding to the rumour mill where everyone starts off by slagging each other off..

    Sure could Methodists or Anglicans isnt it?
    BTW Sunny why do you even encourage idiots like VHP by writing an article on some thing they say….

  27. Vikrant — on 10th March, 2006 at 5:14 am  

    Raz – Am waiting for more concrete news on who was behind it, rather than adding to the rumour mill where everyone starts off by slagging each other off..

    Sure it could be Methodists or Anglicans isnt it?
    BTW Sunny why do you even encourage idiots like VHP by writing an article on some thing they say….

  28. bob — on 10th March, 2006 at 6:17 am  

    they are nutters! but Kellogs should find another way to make these cereals without gelatine though.

  29. rdrr — on 13th March, 2006 at 12:32 pm  

    Sorry if I am repeating anything that has been written already – but what the hell are gelatine/ beef products doing in half of these food products anyway!?

    What next oranges with gelatine in them?
    Waiter can you just check my salad doesnt have gelatine products in it?

    it’s ridiculous! one wonders what effect putting certain food groups together that dont belong together has on our health?

    i think its becoming apparent.

  30. tim — on 20th March, 2006 at 4:38 pm  

    call me naive or whatever but who whould actually think that kellogs would put gelatine in their products? its like a milkshake: where does gelatine actually fit in? it’s insane. why can’t they just cut out the crap and have proper food?

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