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Political plagiarism on immigration


by Nush on 7th March, 2006 at 1:51 pm    

This morning started off like any other, my usual morning ritual of the alarm going off and me turning over and switching on my radio. The headlines came on and in my half sleep-like state I bolted up stunned by what I was hearing. It may sound a tad dramatic for most but I was infuriated by what I heard.

Charles Clarke had announced this morning a “new system” to somewhat tackle, in my opinion, the disastrous scheme that Labour have in place to tackle immigration. But the “new system” has blatantly been plagiarised from the Conservative’s policies outlined just over 6 months ago. Does no one else apart from me remember the Conservative Party Manifesto from the General Election?

Is the general public not outraged, as I am, that once again Tory Party policy has been ripped off and bootlegged? Especially when Labour criticised this exact scheme when the Conservatives proposed it. It seems all too hypocritical of this corrupt government. Forget that the new series of Hustle starts on Friday (BBC1), “the Con is already on”.



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27 Comments   |  


  1. Sunny — on 7th March, 2006 at 2:03 pm  

    Has the General Public not been as out-raged as I have; that once again Tory Party policy has been ripped off and bootlegged.

    I’m more annoyed they’re ripping off Michael Howard’s ideas than anyone else’s ideas.

  2. Nush — on 7th March, 2006 at 2:05 pm  

    ha ha trust you to come out with that.

    be serious dammit!

    how can the Government get away with this?

  3. Sunny — on 7th March, 2006 at 2:16 pm  

    How can I be serious when you ask questions such as:
    Does no one else apart from me remember the Conservative Party Manifesto from the General Election?

    I think we all know the answer to that Nush :)

  4. Nush — on 7th March, 2006 at 2:22 pm  

    obviously i care

  5. Al-Hack — on 7th March, 2006 at 2:46 pm  

    Just what we need; the blind copying the stupid.

  6. Frank — on 7th March, 2006 at 3:08 pm  

    Well observed Nush.

    I see this as another example of the strange similarities of political parties these days. Everyone is copying of each other so profously that I’m confused as to who’s who. David Cameron, leader of labour party yeah? Tony Blair? Isn’t he like a liberal or something?

    Oh I don’t know: the look alike, talk alike, that sooner or later they’ll amalgamate into one ‘for the people’ political party.

    Maybe thats it. Maybe this is a revolution before our very own eyes. That Tony Blair. Still a anti-establishment rock star of his teens.

    cough, cough.

  7. Don — on 7th March, 2006 at 3:39 pm  

    Well, Cameron’s main appeal seems to be, ‘Remember when you still liked Tony Blair? Well I’m a bit like that.’ But bear in mind how big a part he played in that particularly squalid election campaign.

  8. Nush — on 7th March, 2006 at 4:00 pm  

    “I see this as another example of the strange similarities of political parties these days. Everyone is copying of each other so profously that I’m confused as to who’s who. David Cameron, leader of labour party yeah? Tony Blair? Isn’t he like a liberal or something?”

    Frank: its for this reason in essence that people no longer go out and vote. its bloody infuriating too.

  9. leon — on 7th March, 2006 at 4:05 pm  

    “Does no one else apart from me remember the Conservative Party Manifesto from the General Election?”

    Dunno, ask Cameron he wrote it which makes this even funnier because Labour keep telling everyone that and now they are even ripping it off!

  10. Amit — on 7th March, 2006 at 4:13 pm  

    surprise, surprise!

  11. Sunny — on 7th March, 2006 at 4:14 pm  

    Whether it’s a Labour or a Tory proposal - it’s simply a system of categorising people who come here.

    From the Guardian:
    http://politics.guardian.co.uk/homeaffairs/story/0,,1725431,00.html

    It will consolidate more than 80 existing work and study immigration schemes into five tiers:

    · Tier one: highly skilled individuals such as doctors, scientists or entrepreneurs, who will be the only group able to come to Britain without a job offer.

    · Tier two: skilled workers with a job offer such as nurses, teachers or engineers.

    · Tier three: low-skilled workers filling specific temporary labour shortages such as builders for a particular project.

    · Tier four: students.

    · Tier five: “youth mobility” and temporary workers, such as working holidaymakers, musicians coming to perform, sportspeople coming to compete, volunteers or non-preaching religious workers.
    It will apply to those aged 18 to 30 and will allow them to stay for up to two years.

    I’m not sure if it will solve anything… I’m not sure if there is anything even to be solved, apart from a huge backlog in a system that treats people like cattle.

    Anyway, it’s just political posturing.

  12. leon — on 7th March, 2006 at 4:18 pm  

    “Anyway, it’s just political posturing.”

    To quote Amit from above: “Surprise, surprise!”!

  13. Stephen — on 7th March, 2006 at 4:39 pm  

    Forgive me if I’m misunderstanding this

    Wasn’t the Tory system calling for a points scheme that encompassed a limit on both immigration and asylum.

    This is a points system managing work and study immigration NOT those seeking asylum.

    have I got that wrong?

  14. Sunny — on 7th March, 2006 at 4:52 pm  

    Stephen - the focus is on immigration as far as I can see. Asylum seekers are a whole different kettle of fish, something the Tories were prone to forgetting.

    Leon - heh…

  15. Stephen — on 7th March, 2006 at 4:55 pm  

    Stephen - the focus is on immigration as far as I can see. Asylum seekers are a whole different kettle of fish, something the Tories were prone to forgetting.

    Exactly so the proposals are really only superficially similar then.
    Because they have used the words points?

  16. Stephen — on 7th March, 2006 at 4:57 pm  

    I mean used the word- “points”

  17. Stephen — on 7th March, 2006 at 5:00 pm  

    oh yeah and I also noticed this on the BBC

    “Sir Andrew Green, chairman of Migrationwatch UK, said the scheme would not quell public concern about immigration as it imposed no annual limit on the number of people able to settle in the UK.”

    Which again is quite different from the Tory proposals I remember.

  18. Sunny — on 7th March, 2006 at 5:06 pm  

    The Tories said they would want some sort of limits, but refused to specify what they might be as far as I’m aware. Again it was posturing IMO.

    The CBI opposed limits because then it adds more regulation to the flow of human labour I believe, and its difficult to enforce when you have people coming over from Europe when they don’t need a passport.

    People from foreign countries such as India and Pakistan are limited anyway by the number of work visas handed out if I remember correctly.

    Green is talking out of his arse again. It’s near impossible to have a limit of any number of people coming in (or out of the country), but he bangs on about it with the religious fervour (and brains) of Pat Robertson. What else can I expect from a single issue lobby group.

    Yes - it’s superficial - I believe they’re just categorising the streamling the process a bit more.

  19. Stephen — on 7th March, 2006 at 5:11 pm  

    Yes - it’s superficial - I believe they’re just categorising the streamling the process a bit more.

    I agree. the one further point I would add is that any time there is any alteration of the system people of both the right and left immediately condemn for their own ends without looking at it properly.

    This makes construction of a rational or fair policy doubly fraught. Maybe take a deep breath next time Nush???

  20. Frank — on 7th March, 2006 at 5:27 pm  

    “it’s for this reason in essence that people no longer go out and vote. Its bloody infuriating too.”

    Nush - again you have hit upon an important point. Although I voted in the last election, I will not do so in any up and coming elections.

    Why? Because politics is in a serious state of abeyance, on the periphery of ambiguity and suffering from a crisis identity. I have no faith in my government.

    What we need is a return to classic politics: fresh, honest (i.e. middle finger to PC-ness), and about the people.

    We don’t want political parties to appease us at the expense of what they believe in, this just makes them even more trustworthy.

    C’mon politicians. Wake up and smell the garaam chai.

    Or coffee.

    But you’d probably say you like’d both just to keep us happy.

  21. Bilal Mcdaniel — on 7th March, 2006 at 10:39 pm  

    I think the UK should scrap all limits to immigration and invite the third world to settle in your large empty island. Life could only get better; say if 20 million Pakistanis (preferably already westernized uber-liberal, pro-gay marriage Pathans) settled in under populated greater London. Its been scientifically proven, backed up by statistics (available from the Muslim Council of Britain) that when the Muslim community increases its share of the population the quality of life for everyone shoots up. I mean look how swimmingly things are going for the French and Dutch.

  22. Sid D H Arthur — on 7th March, 2006 at 11:22 pm  

    Take heart Bilal. The points-system is the answer to your fears and should end all those nights you’ve been lying awake cold-sweating bullets into your skanky eiderdown. Because as the Howard-Clarke lines get drawn up into the HomeOffice rulebook, it is those Pathans and North-Africans that will be pointed-out at their embassies where, for the sake of your irritable-bowel syndrome, they should be if the B-52 don’t cluster-fuck them first.

  23. Bilal Mcdaniel — on 7th March, 2006 at 11:46 pm  

    Whew, thank God (or Allah if you wish) for that.

  24. Don — on 7th March, 2006 at 11:59 pm  

    This is a very unimaginative way of awarding points. I want to see points for persiflage and repartee, points for being sharp ( and I mean a serious seersucker Saturday-night cranberry accroutrement sharp), and webbed toes; I think that might be a plus for the gene pool, given global warming. This is a crisis, we need to start thinking outside of the box.

  25. Bikhair — on 8th March, 2006 at 12:16 am  

    Bilal McDaniel,

    “I mean look how swimmingly things are going for the French and Dutch.”

    How are things going for the French and the Dutch?

  26. Bilal Mcdaniel — on 8th March, 2006 at 2:11 am  

    Well depends who you talk to Bikhair, if we are to trust the demographic numbers the pundits have been throwing at us lately, that these countries might have a Muslim majority mid-century, then things don’t look on the up and up for the native French and Dutch.

    Just can’t wait to hear the Adan from Notre Dame.

  27. Bikhair — on 8th March, 2006 at 3:52 am  

    Bilal McDaniel,

    “…then things don’t look on the up and up for the native French and Dutch.”

    Which native French and Dutch, the Muslim ones or the non-Muslim ones? You know, your answer to my question sums up the issue of assimilation for Muslims in Europe.

    Oh and by the way, it is phonetically spelled Adthan.

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