Sunny Hundal website



  • Family

    • Liberal Conspiracy
    • Sunny Hundal
  • Comrades

    • Andy Worthington
    • Angela Saini
    • Bartholomew’s notes
    • Bleeding Heart Show
    • Bloggerheads
    • Blood & Treasure
    • Campaign against Honour Killings
    • Cath Elliott
    • Chicken Yoghurt
    • Daily Mail Watch
    • Dave Hill
    • Dr. Mitu Khurana
    • Europhobia
    • Faith in Society
    • Feminism for non-lefties
    • Feministing
    • Gender Bytes
    • Harry’s Place
    • IKWRO
    • MediaWatchWatch
    • Ministry of Truth
    • Natalie Bennett
    • New Statesman blogs
    • Operation Black Vote
    • Our Kingdom
    • Robert Sharp
    • Rupa Huq
    • Shiraz Socialist
    • Shuggy’s Blog
    • Stumbling and Mumbling
    • Ta-Nehisi Coates
    • The F Word
    • Though Cowards Flinch
    • Tory Troll
    • UK Polling Report
  • In-laws

    • Aaron Heath
    • Douglas Clark's saloon
    • Earwicga
    • Get There Steppin’
    • Incurable Hippie
    • Neha Viswanathan
    • Power of Choice
    • Rita Banerji
    • Sarah
    • Sepia Mutiny
    • Sonia Faleiro
    • Southall Black Sisters
    • The Langar Hall
    • Turban Head

  • State help for disabled children a disgrace


    by Rumbold
    3rd March, 2009 at 11:12 am    

    Given that there are around 770,000 disabled children in Britain, you would think that we would have a competent system for dealing with them. Yet an article on the weekend highlighted not only the massive amounts of bureaucracy involved, but also the inadequate care which many disabled children and their parents receive:

    “To apply for appropriate benefits, you have to fill out 10 different forms containing 1,194 questions, spread out over 319 pages. Many families rely on these benefits, as regular employment when you have a disabled child is made practically impossible by the multiplicity of appointments. It’s also extremely difficult to find childcare. I couldn’t use a childminder for my daughter, as she needed a fully accessible home.”

    Now, I don’t think that this problem emerged under this particular government. Previous Conservative and Labour governments have not shown themselves to be any more competent in establishing a system that meets the needs of most children. Nor is there a perfect way of doing things, as you do need safeguards to ensure that only those entitled to the help should get it. But this level of bureaucracy is unacceptable, especially as it does nothing to help the child. What we need are more carers for younger disabled children, more money for parents who work as carers, and more assisted living places for older children (16+). That would at least be a start.

    (Via Tim Worstall)


                  Post to del.icio.us


    Filed in: Current affairs






    20 Comments below   |  

    Reactions: Twitter, blogs
    1. pickles

      New blog post: State help for disabled children a disgrace http://www.pickledpolitics.com/archives/3454


    2. State help for disabled children a disgrace - Politics Unlimited | UK politics news

      [...] Read State help for disabled children a disgrace at Pickled Politics [...]


    3. Posts about money as of March 3, 2009 | Shirasmane

      [...] Group on the Past’s report, which recommended that terrorists’ families get a £12,000 payout State help for disabled children a disgrace - pickledpolitics.com 03/03/2009 Given that there are around 770,000 disabled children in Britain, [...]


    4. Pickled Politics » Highlighting carers’ difficulties

      [...] carers’ difficulties by Rumbold on 11th March, 2009 at 12:59 pm     Recently I wrote about the problems facing many disabled children in obtaining help from the state. Now an article [...]




    1. Riz Din — on 3rd March, 2009 at 11:51 am  

      I agree. Beyond fixing the problem of bureaucracy (I know this sounds crazy, but perhaps the gvt itself should have an anti-bureaucracy hit squad), what to do? More resources are needed, but where from? I’d love to have referendums on fiscal expenditure allocation. Instead we appoint a CEO to run the country every four years and give them the powers of a dictator. Less power at the top, I say, and more power to the people (the shareholders of society).

    2. Klav — on 3rd March, 2009 at 12:14 pm  

      Why is there no post on the attacks on the Sri Lankana cricket team in Lahore?

    3. platinum786 — on 3rd March, 2009 at 12:21 pm  

      Because PP tends to comment on things rather than report them. So expect to see a story tommorow, or later on in the week. Also we need to get over the fact someone attacked cricket. I am mortified.

    4. marvin — on 3rd March, 2009 at 12:48 pm  

      Why is there no post on the attacks on the Sri Lankana cricket team in Lahore?

      Well, if you subsribed to the Twitter feed :P you’d see Shamit is angry sad and bitter about the attacks. I do await a post on this though. I am sorry for the off topic comment… Well whilst I am here there’s a good comment piece at the Times on this and the state of increasingly perilous state of Pakistan…

      Back on this the subject of Rumbold’s post, absolutely right, and way too much bureaucracy that is to the detriment of the people it’s supposed to help, as is all too common nowadays :(

    5. MaidMarian — on 3rd March, 2009 at 1:01 pm  

      Rumbold - ‘But this level of bureaucracy is unacceptable, especially as it does nothing to help the child.’

      This talk of ten forms raises an interesting aside regarding the civil liberty debate elsewhere. Is all this not a de facto argument for a single database with all this information on it?

      Riz Din (1) - ‘I’d love to have referendums on fiscal expenditure allocation.’ Me too, but I bet you we would not always like the results.

    6. marvin — on 3rd March, 2009 at 2:25 pm  

      Oops shariq not shamit… It began with an ‘sh’

    7. Sofia — on 3rd March, 2009 at 3:22 pm  

      there’s a private members bill on childrens health and schools being made to have policies on children with long term conditions…it’s all very adhoc…for example, children with sickle cell are not being monitored or even identified in schools where there are large african caribbean populations with the likelihood of having children with this condition.

      http://services.parliament.uk/bills/2008-09/schoolshealthsupport.html

      As for getting support for disabled children..it’s a joke…my sister was only able to get my niece the speech and language therapy required because she fought for it..and is educated enough about the system…that isn’t right! If a child is not given provision early enough then disabilities can have a worse impact on long term health, wellbeing, as well as future employment prospects. If anything makes a disabled person feel disabled, it’s bureaucracy…take a look at the DLA forms disabled people have to fill in..

    8. sarah — on 3rd March, 2009 at 7:07 pm  

      Cross posting at Same Difference. Thanks Rumbold.

    9. Rumbold — on 3rd March, 2009 at 7:24 pm  

      I don’t think that a single database would be more effective, as it would give some officials too much power. What would work would be a reduction in the number of questions asked; why, for example, is it necessary to know someone’s sexual orientation, religion and ethnic group?

      Sofia:

      Thanks for the link.

      Sarah:

      You should really thank Tim- I saw it there first.

    10. MaidMarian — on 3rd March, 2009 at 7:58 pm  

      Rumbold - I agree with you about reducing the number of questions asked, but your examples are a red-herring. Equal opps monitoring forms are, by law, voluntary.

      There is a good argument, but it’s a weak example.

    11. Rumbold — on 3rd March, 2009 at 8:51 pm  

      Without wishing to sound paranoid, I do wonder how voluntary these forms are, especially when people are applying for something. Would you risk your child losing out on help by not filling in a ‘voluntary’ form, which is strongly pushed at you? I wouldn’t.

    12. Sofia — on 3rd March, 2009 at 8:56 pm  

      i used to ask the same thing about equal ops forms…but i do think that they are necessary especially when analysing inequalities.

    13. Rumbold — on 3rd March, 2009 at 9:11 pm  

      Sofia:

      Not really. They don’t tell you anything about the person’s upbringing, wealth or income. Nor should they.

    14. Sofia — on 3rd March, 2009 at 9:15 pm  

      i meant inequalities in access to services etc..depending on ethnicity, gender and sexuality primarily….i agree they don’t highlight other areas of socio economic deprivation.

    15. halima — on 3rd March, 2009 at 10:08 pm  

      Good effort to highlight the challenges faces by people with disabilities.

    16. halima — on 3rd March, 2009 at 10:08 pm  

      Good effort to highlight the challenges faced by people with disabilities.

    Sorry, the comment form is closed at this time.

    Pickled Politics © Copyright 2005 - 2010. All rights reserved. Terms and conditions.
    With the help of PHP and Wordpress.