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    Slumdog Millionaire - weekend review


    by Sunny on 13th December, 2008 at 11:54 am    

    Continuing the weekend reviews season, Shazanna Safdar-Karim reviews apparently the hottest indy film on the block - Slumdog Millionaire:

    Exposing the gritty underworld of India, the film explores the alleged fraud of Jamal, a young slumdog well on his way to winning 20 million rupees on Who Wants to be a Millionaire in India. En route to powering through the Indian game show, Jamal also captures the nation’s heart.

    As with numerous films which are based on novels, audience members who have read the book in advance may be disappointed. Whilst the film deals with many of the issues raised in the novel, not everything can be captured in two hours.
    Certainly, Swarup will be pleased with the acknowledgment in the titles, more pleasing will be Boyle’s supreme competence in bringing so many varied themes fate, poverty, torture, the underworld and hope.

    An absolutely honest, cutting and rather haunting must-see!

    I really want to see this film too now, several friends who have seen advanced previews have praised it. What say you?



      |     |   Add to del.icio.us   |   Share on Facebook   |   Filed in: Current affairs




    48 Comments below   |  

    1. halima — on 13th December, 2008 at 1:11 pm  

      Hey Sunny

      I was going to suggest putting a post up on this, too, I’ve been seeing the adverts and interviews with Danny B and the crew and it looks superb! Rags to riches in Mumbai and a love story to prove to the gal that he can make it! Can’t wait!

    2. persephone — on 13th December, 2008 at 6:44 pm  

      is this a Bolly remake of Planet of the Apes? If not, the actor on the right should re-tink his bouffant hair style & beard.

      Am afraid I do not get excited about Bolly films.

    3. Ravi Naik — on 13th December, 2008 at 7:26 pm  

      is this a Bolly remake of Planet of the Apes? If not, the actor on the right should re-tink his bouffant hair style & beard.

      lol. :)

      Am afraid I do not get excited about Bolly films.

      I was not impressed with the trailer, but it got good reviews in the West, and some are already talking about the movie being an Oscar contender (not that it says much about the quality).

    4. Vikrant — on 14th December, 2008 at 11:56 am  

      Saw the movie. It was great, Dev Patel is a fantastic actor, but lad’s accent unfortunately was kinda outta place!

    5. halima — on 14th December, 2008 at 12:38 pm  

      Can’t wait to see it! I heard the film was shot mostly outside - whereas most Bollywood is shot inside studios to avoid the masses that turn up on the shoot. I wonder if that gave the shooting quality a different style.

      “is this a Bolly remake of Planet of the Apes? If not, the actor on the right should re-tink his bouffant hair style & beard.”

      bouffant and beards are all the rage in London’s trendy set i noticed! :)

    6. El Cid — on 14th December, 2008 at 1:19 pm  

      Ha ha. Loved that Planet of the Apes comment. Too much blowdrying methinks.

      Anyway, Picklers I need your help.
      I’m writing an essay on a person’s duty to tell the truth, which I am rather enjoying but which I am desperate to break the back off.
      Naturally, I have highlighted how western thinking on this deviates hugely from Plato’s Noble Lie to Kant’s Categorical Imperative. I am also throwing in a couple of Judeo-Christian references and I most definitely want to bung in 1 or 2 sentences on what Islam says about when it is ok to lie, which is very specific and very pertinent.

      However, I am very wary about the quality of online sourcing. Maybe this is what happens when bunging up the Koran on T’internet is forbidden, but almost everything I see when I Google Lying and Islam is Islamwatch this, Islamaphobia that. Please advice on my sourcing.

      The best I have found is this outwardly Christian but seemingly moderate and reasonable Islam Review, where it quotes the prophet as saying:
      “He is not a false person who (through lies) settles conciliation among people, supports good or says what is good.”
      I would love to use this quote but is it the real deal?
      http://www.islamreview.com/articles/lying.shtml

      This other guy, on http://muslim-responses.com/Islam_on_Lying/Islam_on_Lying_ , provides a three-pronged fuller ruling from Sahih MuslimBook 032, Number 6303:exceptions (whatever that is):
      “Ibn Shihab said he did not hear that exemption was granted in anything what the people speak as lie but in three cases: in battle, for bringing reconciliation amongst persons and the narration of the words of the husband to his wife, and the narration of the words of a wife to her husband (in a twisted form in order to bring reconciliation between them).”

      What you reckon?

    7. Rumbold — on 14th December, 2008 at 2:41 pm  

      El Cid:

      From a hadith (sayings of Muhammad):

      “On the Day of Resurrection Allah will not look at… the person who swears [to the truth] while lying about his merchandise.”

      Another hadith:

      “If you do not give up telling lies, God will have to need for you giving up food and drink [during Ramadan].”

      Surah 24:14:

      “Those who spread slander about the believers will have a painful punishment in this world and the next!”

      (Though this was a specific reference to gossip about Muhammad’s wife Aishah’s alleged adultery.)

      Surah 49:12:

      “[Backbiting is like] eating the flesh of your brother.”

    8. El Cid — on 14th December, 2008 at 2:53 pm  

      Rumbold, I didn’t ask that (and no sourcing either).
      The Bible is full of contradictions too.
      This is a serious academic exercise.
      Now come on any Muslims in the house, can you direct me to a credible website with those exceptions on whether it is ok to lie (which, for me, by the way, is just telling it as it is. Show me a Kant and I’ll show you a …..)

    9. Rumbold — on 14th December, 2008 at 3:05 pm  

      El Cid:

      The source was the Qur’an.

    10. El Cid — on 14th December, 2008 at 3:19 pm  

      Rumbold. I have to write a bibliography, harvard school style .. with page number, publisher, name of translater, etc. Get it now?
      I assume then you have a copy to hand?

    11. El Cid — on 14th December, 2008 at 3:39 pm  

      Just in case anyone got deviated by that last exchange, here is the crux of the matter: I need your help.
      I’m writing an essay on a person’s duty to tell the truth, which I am rather enjoying but which I am desperate to break the back off.
      Naturally, I have highlighted how western thinking on this deviates hugely from Plato’s Noble Lie to Kant’s Categorical Imperative. I am also throwing in a couple of Judeo-Christian references and I most definitely want to bung in 1 or 2 sentences on what Islam says about when it is ok to lie, which is very specific and very pertinent.

      However, I am very wary about the quality of online sourcing. Maybe this is what happens when bunging up the Koran on T’internet is forbidden, but almost everything I see when I Google Lying and Islam is Islamwatch this, Islamaphobia that. Please advice on my sourcing.

      The best I have found is this outwardly Christian but seemingly moderate and reasonable Islam Review, where it quotes the prophet as saying:
      “He is not a false person who (through lies) settles conciliation among people, supports good or says what is good.”
      I would love to use this quote but is it the real deal?
      http://www.islamreview.com/articles/lying.shtml

      This other guy, on http://muslim-responses.com/Islam_on_Lying/Islam_on_Lying_ , provides a three-pronged fuller ruling from Sahih MuslimBook 032, Number 6303:exceptions (whatever that is):
      “Ibn Shihab said he did not hear that exemption was granted in anything what the people speak as lie but in three cases: in battle, for bringing reconciliation amongst persons and the narration of the words of the husband to his wife, and the narration of the words of a wife to her husband (in a twisted form in order to bring reconciliation between them).”

      What you reckon?

    12. Rumbold — on 14th December, 2008 at 3:42 pm  

      My quotes were from a textbook, quoting from the Qur’an. The hadith quotes are both on p.132 of the book.

      Maqsood, Ruqaiyyah Warris. Examining Religions: Islam.Heinemann Education Publishers, 1995.

      Here are the Qur’an quotes from my copy of the Qur’an:

      Surah 49:12:

      “And do not spy, neither backbite one another; would any of you like to eat the flesh of his brother dead?”

      (p.537)

      Surah 24:19:

      “There awaits them [slanderers] a painful chastisement in the present world and the world to come.”

      (p.354)

      The Koran. Trans. Arthur J. Arberry. Oxford University Press, 1998.

    13. El Cid — on 14th December, 2008 at 3:45 pm  

      Rumbold, why are you being difficult?
      Now be helpful please and tell me where my two quotes come from?
      Is this of help: Sahih MuslimBook 032, Number 6303:

    14. El Cid — on 14th December, 2008 at 4:20 pm  

      Afif Tabarrah seems to be the source of this much recycled so-called Islamic reference to what could be described as white lies. But who is this person?

    15. El Cid — on 14th December, 2008 at 4:33 pm  

      Excellent I have my credible source, The University of South Carolina. Thanks Rumbold.
      “The Book of Virtue, Good Manners and Joining of the Ties of Relationship (Kitab Al-Birr was-Salat-I-wa’l-Adab)” by Sahih Muslim
      (Sahih Muslim (full name Abul Husain Muslim bin al-Hajjaj al-Nisapuri) was born in 202 A.H. and died in 261 A.H. He travelled widely to gather his collection of ahadith, including to Iraq, Saudi Arabia, Syria, and Egypt. Out of 300,000 ahadith which he evaluated, only 4,000 approximately were extracted for inclusion into his collection based on stringent acceptance).
      Translator: Abdul Hamid Siddiqui

      “A liar is not one who tries to bring reconciliation amongst people and speaks good (in order to avert dispute), or he conveys good. Ibn Shihab said he did not hear that exemption was granted in anything what the people speak as lie but in three cases: in battle, for bringing reconciliation amongst persons and the narration of the words of the husband to his wife, and the narration of the words of a wife to her husband (in a twisted form in order to bring reconciliation between them).”

      http://www.usc.edu/schools/college/crcc/engagement/resources/texts/muslim/hadith/muslim/032.smt.html

    16. Rumbold — on 14th December, 2008 at 6:06 pm  

      El Cid:

      Sorry, all the book said was ‘hadith’.

    17. riazat butt — on 15th December, 2008 at 5:00 pm  

      Saw the film in the US and loved it! Thought it was dramatic, funny, heartbreaking and shocking. A great sense of humour and just an absolute cinematic stunner. Really really enjoyed it and will definitely see it again
      @Vikrant - Dev Patel was in Skins…

    18. AsifB — on 15th December, 2008 at 5:31 pm  

      At last a comment on the actual filum - which is a must go see; it was the highlight of the London Film Festival. And genuinely heartwarming.

      I’d expect nothing less from Danny Boyle who is a great director, but for those searching for more than a couple of hours of celluloid, ponder these connections between creators of recent popular British culture and artists engaging with issues of interest to the writers in this forum on the world in which we live.

      - So the director of Trainspotting (naughty Scots junkies) and the writer of Full Monty (ex steelworkers strip in Sheffield) make a moving film about an Indian slum dweller winning Millionaire, (perhaps not a surprise to those who saw the political origins of the two big cinema hits or who know Simon Beaufoy wrote C4’s Yasmin
      - But then the creator of Who Wants to be a Millionaire himself, went on to write the moving pro-migrant story of Dirty Pretty Things
      - And Danny’s contemporary rival, Michael Winterbottom, director of 24 Hour Party People , as fun a celebration of Northern muso hedonism as you can get, is also responsible for Road to Guantanamo, A might Heart and Welcome to Sarijevo.

      Makes you think, no?

    19. halima — on 15th December, 2008 at 5:41 pm  

      That was exactly what i thought when i read all the credits - being a sucker for slightly streetwise, edgy, intelligent movies ( with the exception of Bollywood classics), I thought it sounded right up my street!

      The best of bollywood and british as far as i can tell ..

    20. halima — on 15th December, 2008 at 5:43 pm  

      Ooops. Ignore blank post ( power blackouts getting in the way..)

    21. persephone — on 15th December, 2008 at 7:59 pm  

      @ 3 Thanks for the link to the review which describes it as a “hyperkinetic phantasmagoria ” - which tempts me to see it just to see what that means

    22. Ravi — on 17th December, 2008 at 5:38 am  

      was ecstatic, elated, on cloud nine after coming out of the theater. What a Bollywood flick I just finished watching! But then I found myself in a confused state. Why revered film critics across the globe have showered so much accolades on this Bollywoodish make. I must be missing something. And I don’t.

      The movie centers around tumultuous life of two boys, their journey from a Mumbai slum to two different worlds, dominated by corruption and adolescence like naiveté.

      The movie has all the elements of a Bollywood masala flick that is ridiculed by foreign and Indian media on a regular basis because of its filmsy, melodramatic, and often childish like treatment of any and every subject. THIS MOVIE IS NO EXCEPTION.

      Recall the following scenes from the movie:

      Two brothers, one treads the path of eternal honesty while the other ventures into the world of immorality. That reminds me of Deewaar (1975). I bet Mr. Danny Boyle must have taken few lessons of Bollywood movie-making from likes of Subhas Ghai, David Dhawan, Manmohan Desai etc. Come on Admit it.

      Then the love interest of the younger brother is found in Mumbai’s red light areas? Reminds me of Sadak by Sanjay Dutta, among others. Damn it! It must be me. Danny simply imagined these stuff from his vast experience with Indian way of life and it has NOTHING to do with Bollywood masalas.

      Then recall the death scene of the older brother. That’s a typical Indian death scene. The last scene where the male and female leads meet each other, are we watching a romantic Hindi flick?

      The script of the movie is filled with Mr. Boyle’s faulty and nonsensical imaginations. Where the older kid gets the gun, suddenly? How these two most shabbily looking kids manage to check into an apparently five-star hotel? How come the older kid knows the address of the local mafia? There are many. What Mr. Boyle was thinking.

      Then there is efficient selling of world famous Indian poverty filled with filth and pain, and agony and all other stereotypical things that go well with Western view of any “third world countries”. Ultimately Mr. Boyle dishes out a palatable Bollywood flick.

      If all these things were captured in celluloid by a NON-WHITE filmmaker, then western media would simply reject it straightaway. But this is not the case here. Its made by a WHITE filmmaker, for a WHITE audience who love those movies made on third world countries, which only reinforce their age-old ideas about India. I can bet that all the Bollywood directors are weeping in secret and thinking why can’t I make such a terribly bad movie and garner all these international accolades. YOU CANT because you are not a white. As simple as that.

      So Mr Boyle thanks for selling India to the western world, making a cliché non-sense melodramatic movie and hiding behind neo-realism film-making shell and at the end of the day just pretend (when you will be receiving some filthy award) that you are such a genius. And for western film critics, you may have some knowledge of good films, but you are ultimately a White person, enjoying deep in heart the poverty of a developing world. What a nonsense.

    23. persephone — on 17th December, 2008 at 11:01 am  

      From the above review I don’t feel I need to see the film as it appears to have the same plotlines & cliches as Bolly films (regardless of the race of the director)

      … it does not seem to live up to the promise of the the description as: “An absolutely honest, cutting and rather haunting must-see”

    24. El Cid — on 18th December, 2008 at 10:42 pm  

      Ha! I’ve just realised what this post is about after reading this:
      http://www.independent.co.uk/arts-entertainment/films/news/slumdog-millionaire-scoops-six-nominations-1203297.html
      Sorry, I’ve been busy and peoccupied.
      In view of my recent comments on Indian films, this release is very timely. I look forward to seeing it.

    25. Slumdog Crapo — on 24th December, 2008 at 6:04 am  

      Agreeing with Ravi,
      Do you have to be a WHITE director to WIN an Oscar for a Bollywood Movie? Is there a rule within the Oscars where as no Asian film director is allowed to win an Oscar for a South Asian Movie? Because it seems to me that only White Directors are allowed to win?

      Bollywood is one of the Biggest Film Industries within the world with fantastic creative film directors who would not even get a look through the door at the Oscars, yet here comes a white film director, who has no Idea about Indian Culture, Indian films and now he and his moron writer are getting credited in making a Bollywood film?

      It just seems ironic that a foreign film director is getting accolade for a Bollywood film? It seems rather racist to me. What about great film directors like Mani Rattman, Ram Gopal Varma, Satyajit Ray, Raj Kapoor, the list is endless….. They have all made fantastic Movies. Yet never credited? Amir Khans Lagaan, and Devdas?

      Its not even a matter of the film director being White is just seems fake! Oscar accolade is fake! He should be ashamed of even excepting the award.

      Selling of world stupid ideas of poverty, that the Western view of any “third world countries”.

      Danny Boyle doesn’t even do justice to the Bollywod tradition of film making.

      If this film was made by am South Asian filmmaker, then western media would simply reject it straightaway calling it Bollywood and rubbish. But this is not the case here.

      Its made by a white filmmaker, and this is why it gets me so angry. Only a few months ago this film was destined to straight to Video but now its getting press for no reason at all!

      I also know that the Bollywood directors in India are really unhappy crying in their sleep by this director receiving all these international accolades.

      Non-white film directors cant win Oscars.

      You cannot ever win an Oscar because you are not a white. As simple as that. Only white directors are allowed to make films in South Asia, Africa etc etc.

      A nonsense film and it just goes to show how Racist the Oscars really are.

      Its just sad and i hope the industry starts to realise that there are good film directors in the world that are not white you know. 1-10

    26. persephone — on 24th December, 2008 at 11:28 am  

      @25 I can see where you are coming from since from the above comments it appears this film is not really that different from other bolly fare (bearing in mind I have not seen it)

      I do think that bolly directors do lack credibility in the industry which could be down to prejudice. Also Danny Boyle has done much better at contacting building & getting to know the right people.

      But:

      “You cannot ever win an Oscar because you are not a white.”

      Well non white actors have won oscars or did you specifically mean non white DIRECTORS?

    27. Jai — on 24th December, 2008 at 11:41 am  

      ‘Slumdog Millionaire’ isn’t a Bollywood film (and isn’t supposed to be, as per the “tradition” of that style of film-making) — it’s just set in Bombay/Mumbai and has a couple of Bollywood actors in major roles.

      It’s not like it’s an English-language remake of ‘Kabhi Kushi Kabhi Gham’ or something ;)

    28. persephone — on 24th December, 2008 at 11:46 am  

      So what are the hallmarks of something being defined as a bolywood film?

      Say for eg is an art house film made in mumbai with bolly actors & director but of an alternative plotline/genre classified as a bollywood film?

    29. Jai — on 24th December, 2008 at 12:26 pm  

      So what are the hallmarks of something being defined as a bolywood film?

      A ‘mainstream’ movie — the usual stuff. Having people miming to songs is probably a good indicator too, although the lines are blurred in ’song-less’ films like Being Cyrus, Ek Hasina Thi etc.

      The definition is probably a bit more wide-ranging these days than it used to be, since the plotlines in recent years have been more diverse compared to the usual romantic melodramas that movies by Karan Johar, Aditya Chopra, Sanjay Leela Bhansali etc were prime examples of (although they’ve started “diversifying” too).

      Say for eg is an art house film made in mumbai with bolly actors & director but of an alternative plotline/genre classified as a bollywood film?

      Not really — for example, think of all those “parallel cinema” films from the 70s & 80s starring people like Smita Patil etc, compared to the mainstream blockbusters starring Amitabh Bachchan and so on.

      I expect many non-South Asians would still regard them as ‘Bollywood’ films though, somewhat inaccurately.

    30. Amrit — on 24th December, 2008 at 12:32 pm  

      I kind of agree with Slumdog Crapo. I think that if you were going to give an Oscar to a Bollywood film, it should’ve been to Rang De Basanti! That was a REALLY GOOD FILM!

    31. persephone — on 26th December, 2008 at 12:10 pm  

      I’ve not seen the films at 29 & 30 but an un-bollywoodish film I saw (all the way to the end) that was different was called Chandni Bar with an actress called Tabu in the lead.

      I thought it was different in that:

      - Tabu could act (and did not change her clothes every time she sashayed around a different rose-bush/canadian side walk).

      - There were no big music productions & miming, melodrama.

      - The plot was not too formulaic or predictable.

      - Overall it showed the seedy underbelly behind the tinsel that is bollywood.

    32. Slumdog Crapo — on 9th January, 2009 at 11:02 pm  

      Isnt it weird that i posted my comments on IMDB and they took it off? Becasue i suggested why is a white film director getting all this credit for a Bollywood film? We have been making these films for Years! Yet no one mentions the films Chandni Bar is a fantastic movie and so Oscar worthy, yet did the Oscars give him a look in? No.
      Slumdog Is Bollywood! It has all the hallmarks yet its because its directed by a white film maker Danny Boyle. Everyones raving about it.

      I would place a million pounds if the director was South Asian, they would just side line it as Bollywood.

      Slumdog is predictable. I am not saying its a bad movie! But it just pees me off that white directors are only allowed to win awards or be hailed as the next best thing!
      Bollocks!

      And for the question above None white Asian film directors from South Asia, or South Asian origin. I work in the media and they get sidelined for people like Boyle.

    33. El Cid — on 10th January, 2009 at 9:58 am  

      I saw Slumdog Millionaire last night.
      It was ok and pretty stylish.
      But Oscar winner? No chance.
      It has no gravitas. It tried to deal with too many issues/emotions so quickly that it was like a drop of oil spread over a petri dish of water.

    34. George — on 10th January, 2009 at 11:20 am  

      #32 says “I would place a million pounds if the director was South Asian, they would just side line it as Bollywood.”
      Very true.
      So why does Bolly get dismissed as silly in the West? Chinese and Korean are also Asians but their films are respected and even copied.
      Time for the Indians to think hard here - time to stop plagiarising and introduce intelligent themes for a change. Where some decent dialogue is called for, we are treated to these tiresome dances. Note also how white dancers are recruited copiously. The directors must suffer from a colour complex.

    35. Slumdog Crapo — on 11th January, 2009 at 5:03 pm  

      Haa George well, doesnt in go to show that the most successful films are Bollywood, and go tell that Danny Boyle when he plagiarised Bollywood????
      And for your kind information, If he does win anything it was because of a Bollywood film.. And your comments explain my point of how western people view Bollywood. With typical stereotypical way

    36. AsifB — on 13th January, 2009 at 1:16 am  

      In the interests of complying with blogosphere rule 1C and diverting every debate to all matters Islamic, does anyone else see Slumdog Millionaire as pro-Muslim?

      (Mr Crapo’s comments are getting rather tedious so I thought I’d chaneg the record; Satiygit Ray and Mira Nair have done all right out of western film awards and anyone seeing Slumdog - and you really should regardless of awards - will recognise that this is a very consciously a film for the age of 21st century globalisation with deliberate nods to Indian filmaking, whilst very clearly reflecting Boyle’s Trainspotting style of filmaking and sentimental politics of the writer of the Full Monty (and the author of Q&A the book on which the screenplay is based)

      So back to Muslims -and without getting into spoliers - cos you really should see it - as well as one key plot point early on, a key character says ‘God is Great’ (rather than Allah Akbar) three times in the film.

      Is this dhimmitude!

    37. baanu — on 13th January, 2009 at 4:57 am  

      i agree with u ravi..many indian movies which have the same soul as slum dog had come before as well..but those made by our great indian directors.if today our genious AR.Rahman gets the accrediton for slumdog why not before for his soulful music in many indian made soulful movies..

    38. fug — on 13th January, 2009 at 10:15 am  

      the film used the gameshow as an interesting way of telling a story. it got the south asian materialistic snobbery down to a ‘T’. Much kudos to Vikas Swarap for writing the original book upon which this is based.

      The gripes were that Irfaan Khan played the part of unrealistically open eared copper rather awesomely, and a lot of the gestures and behavious of the indian cast looked very white, not south asian at all. Not exactly bad gripes. I am happy that the bolly rubbish only came out right at the end.

      slumdug made oblique reference to religious spastication in india and, in my view, one of the less reported matters the gangsterisation of minorities problem. It does this in a very congressy way though.

      i dont think its particularly pro-islam. (our heros pretty carefree reflection on Allah and Ram’s affect on his life) It would have been nice to see them use a muslim actor for Jamal The Stud. Baby Jamal was particularly cute.

    39. AsifB — on 13th January, 2009 at 5:27 pm  

      Fug (34/2) I was being tongue in cheek about the religious element. I think the gangsterisation was as much as Dickenisan plot device as anything else and think the only ‘Congressy’ factors were the pictures on Irfan Khan’s wall.

      I think asking for a Muslim actor to play a Muslim role is as daft as insisting that only Indian Indians should have been involved in this film; it is just acting after all we;re talking about, nobody blacked up, Boyle did (*like Salaam Bombay and the late Ray,) make good use of non-professional child actors, (including a couple with Muslim names) and the portrayal of white characters as foreign tourists was far more from an Indian perspective than every other western directed film I can think of (Wes Anderson Darleejing Ltd this means you)

      The earlier debates above complaining about lack of Oscars for Indian/Bollywood talent kind of missed the point (they are American awards after all with English language being a qualifying element for most catogeries most of the time. The fad for Crouching Tiger type films is just a form of commerical appropriation if people are going to argue that East Asian cinema is more respected than the South Asian industry which is far from ignored when it has material to offer; Shekar Kapur was able to make Elizabeth wasn;t he, and Spike Lee used AR Rahman on the Inside Man soundtrack and Tim Robbins used Nusrat Fateh Ali Khan on that Susan Sarondon anti-death penalty nun flick IIRC.)

      I don;t think anybody can go away from Slumdog without thinking of it as only being possible due to Indian storytelling and talent.(Anil Kapoor in particular is a star turn only eclipsed by the effectiveness of the kids and editing)

      The portrayal of Indian wealth and business growth in the film- not just poverty and slumdwelling - is not one old fashioned Brit imperial types would feel comfortable with, so the British director writer team don;t deserve some of the cynicism heaped upon them above.

      Quite how its a feelgood film (as its being marketed - wrongly according to Boyle on Newsnight review) is another question of course, but that;s the film industry for you.

      (Personally, I think the main purpose of the song and dance at the end is to give people a chance to wipe their tears, well it was for me)

    40. Amrit — on 15th January, 2009 at 7:48 pm  

      DUN DUN DUUNNNNNNN!

      Nirpal ‘Famous For The Women I Fucked’ Dhaliwal has reviewed it. He actually sounds quite reasonable for once!

      http://www.guardian.co.uk/film/filmblog/2009/jan/15/danny-boyle-shows

    41. Ravi Naik — on 15th January, 2009 at 10:40 pm  

      Nirpal ‘Famous For The Women I Fucked’ Dhaliwal has reviewed it. He actually sounds quite reasonable for once!

      Pretty good article. Amitabh Bachchan’s comment is priceless… what a fool!

    42. persephone — on 15th January, 2009 at 11:43 pm  

      The irony behind this (and Amitabh Bachan’s remarks) is that typical Bolly films are watched by the poor masses as an outlet to escape from their lives. It appears that the classes who are making money from them want to keep the so called underbelly hidden

    43. fug — on 16th January, 2009 at 12:51 am  

      and the classes of diasporic ‘we havent got a clueists’ hold onto this cultural distaction, this ‘noise’ as if it were cool. meanwhile white people fiegn enjoyment and ‘consumption’, except for a few cultural theorists who make me wish they themselves were brown.

      …ahem….

      the congressy line i felt was jamals, after the riot sequence…
      ‘its because of ram and allah that i have no mother’

      i wasnt asking for a muslim to play the role, i’d just have liked to see it. good for the 18 year old kid who eventually won it.

    44. persephone — on 16th January, 2009 at 10:16 am  

      “and the classes of diasporic ‘we havent got a clueists’ hold onto this cultural distaction, this ‘noise’ as if it were cool”

      Fug, I agree with this on a level.

      It is one of the reasons why I don’t watch bolly fare.

      I feel that the bolly industry has sold out a large part of the nation.

      By watching bolly films you are helping the industry make more money (for a closed privileged set & where nepotism runs like wildfire) & fund more films in like vein. So is there not a case in saying that by watching bolly fare you are complicit in all of this?

      (yes I know some bolly money is given to local charities & ostensible ‘good works’ done by high profile bolly people)

    45. Amrit — on 1st February, 2009 at 11:41 pm  

      Seen it and written a review too!

      http://gts-kjb.blogspot.com/2009/02/self-control-and-slumdog-millionaire.html

    46. SE — on 2nd February, 2009 at 12:58 pm  

      http://in.movies.yahoo.com/news-detail/43396/Slumdog-Millionaire-mediocre-trashy-Director-Priyadarshan.html

      I 100% agree with Priyadarshan, its for westerners who think ‘dem pakis are assbackwards’

    47. alana — on 2nd February, 2009 at 3:41 pm  

      http://mythofmyra.com/

    48. Baby name meaning and origin for Afif — on 17th March, 2009 at 4:11 am  

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