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    Bangladesh bombs evoke backlash


    by Al-Hack on 2nd December, 2005 at 2:49 am    

    On Tuesday 9 people died and over 40 injured when more bombs went off in Bangladesh, only two weeks before two judges were also killed by terrorists. Bloggers such as Addabaj were in anguish.

    Families are in pain. Whole Bangladesh is in the state of shock. The whole world is looking at us. Bangladesh is not Afghanistan and it will never be.

    Yesterday, another bomb went off, claimed by the banned group Jamaat-ul-Mujahideen. This time, Rewan from Dhaka is furious at the government’s inability to crack down on extremists who want to turn the country into an Islamic state.

    The government should act now before these menaces cripple the country. Otherwise, soon the people will give their ruling and there will be no return.

    He chronicles more reaction here. Global Voices also catches bloggers reacting in anger. Update: Siddhartha also has more coverage.



    Print this page and comments   |     |   Add to del.icio.us   |   Share on Facebook   |   Filed in: South Asia




    62 Comments below   |  

    1. blue mountain — on 2nd December, 2005 at 6:30 am  

      The government should act now before these menaces cripple the country. Otherwise, soon the people will give their ruling and there will be no return.

      One thing is for sure. Current Government led by Khaleda Zia will not do anything real to contain the extremists (just like Pak Military). They happily let Islamists gain foothold in Bangladesh. Why would they stop Islamists with whom they share power with ?

    2. Sakshi — on 2nd December, 2005 at 7:04 am  

      I sort off agree with Blue Mountain. Somewhere it feels as if…Bangladesh is also heading the Pakistan way.

      On the other hand…these bombings hardly get any attention by the world media…it just shows how dis-interested are the ‘political parties’ and ‘MSM’…in the pilght of Bangladeshi citizens.

    3. Vikrant — on 2nd December, 2005 at 7:18 am  

      BNP is burning its own fingers here. It wont be long before Khaleda’s pet jihadsists would turn their guns on her.

    4. blue mountain — on 2nd December, 2005 at 7:49 am  

      They say their real enemy is India and now they are very friendly with their Pakistani brethren which commited genocide in 1971.

    5. Siddharth — on 2nd December, 2005 at 11:16 am  

      I’ve also posted about this on my blog here

    6. Siddharth — on 2nd December, 2005 at 11:57 am  

      They say their real enemy is India and now they are very friendly with their Pakistani brethren which commited genocide in 1971.

      BlueMountain, the situation is slightly more complicated than the vacuous and simplistic Hindutva-style analysis you’ve supplied here. But given the ridiculous statements you have come out out with about the Genocide in the past, not surprising.

    7. blue mountain — on 2nd December, 2005 at 1:01 pm  

      Sid

      I admire the romanticism and myticism of your Baul Muslim heart-I really do-but I am well within my rights to speak my mind and offer a “realistic” opinion as opposed to your “progressive” one .

      As I have told before and your brain seems unable to contain it, I am not bound by any “ism”,”va”,”wing” or any political types.

      Why are you so ashamed to talk about the events in 1971? Is it because your own brethren commited those brutal acts on you ?

    8. blue mountain — on 2nd December, 2005 at 1:17 pm  

      the situation is slightly more complicated

      I hope you heard this one liner from the former Australian cricket captain and Channel Nine commentator Bill Lawry:

      It’s deja vu all over again !!

    9. Siddharth — on 2nd December, 2005 at 1:20 pm  

      er no, BluMountain, that won’t do. I could have ignored the the incredibly childish throwaway remark you made in (4) but for some reason I, wrongly, decided to take the bait. Sigh.

      The reason why I know you are a Hindutva stylee simpleton is because they always throw down, as you have just done, the one about how Bangladeshis should feel “ashamed” about the mass rape inflicted on the women of Bangladesh during the war in 1971. As if the country should feel a collective shame for a crime whose burden of guilt is carried by Pakistan’s War Crimes. This says more about your ideas of shifting the blame to the rape victim than attributing the crime to the rapist. This says more about your primitive ideas about women and rape than you would like to admit.

      Like most of your comments, the one in (4) has got the right premise but the wrong conclusion. The increase in Fanatacism in Bangladesh is because of all sorts of factors, but being “friendly with their Pakistani brethren” has got sweet fanny adams to do with it.

    10. blue mountain — on 2nd December, 2005 at 1:34 pm  

      Re. Comment no. 4

      This is what the terrorists who bombed your country say and do. Those are not my words.

    11. blue mountain — on 2nd December, 2005 at 1:36 pm  

      The increase in Fanatacism in Bangladesh is because of all sorts of factors…..

      What sort of factors? Please elucidate

    12. blue mountain — on 2nd December, 2005 at 1:50 pm  

      It’s no surprise that who they blame for the bomb explosions

      http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/articleshow/1248661.cms

    13. Vikrant — on 2nd December, 2005 at 2:00 pm  

      The increase in Fanatacism in Bangladesh is because of all sorts of factors…..

      Voila… its Hindutva isnt it? That line of thinking is … simply.. pathetic. I’ve read Taslima Nassrin’s Lajja she virtually places the whole blame on rise of Hindutva in India!. It can also be argues that Hindutva wave that griped India in 90’s was a direct result of ethnic cleansing of Hindus in Kashmir valley & Bangladesh by Jihadists. In klast 20 years India has been home to 20 million Bangladeshi refugees… majority of them Hindus. When one old & diused mosque is brought down by fundies in India, literally thousands of Hindu temples are desecrated in Pakistan, Bangladesh and even Britain… why?

      Its because of Hindutva ofcourse… isnt it Sid?

    14. Siddharth — on 2nd December, 2005 at 2:00 pm  

      File under ‘Tosser’

    15. Siddharth — on 2nd December, 2005 at 2:08 pm  

      It’s no surprise that who they blame for the bomb explosions

      This article is from 3 months ago and does not refer to the 3 incidents in November. The mood of the country has changed following the explosions targetting courts of law, judges and lawyers. People are blaming the government and not India.

    16. Siddharth — on 2nd December, 2005 at 2:11 pm  

      Vikrant: No at no point was I blaming the Hindutva for the terrorist bombs in Bangladesh. I said your mate BlueMountain is Hindutva as per his ideas on rape and culpability.

    17. blue mountain — on 2nd December, 2005 at 2:19 pm  

      The mood of the country has changed following the explosions targetting courts of law, judges and lawyers. People are blaming the government and not India.

      Of course. As long as bourgeois class is not threatened you can safely blame India. Now it’s become a Frankenstein’s monster. Best of luck

    18. Siddharth — on 2nd December, 2005 at 2:19 pm  

      BlueMountain - it always beggars belief when Right-WIng Indians like you, bring in Pakistan when Bangladesh goes through an Islamic terrorist crisis. Why? What have you got to prove? And where does it get you?

      I’m ready to move on and discuss the matters at hand rather than deal with your prejudices which is clogging up this thread, if thats ok with you.

    19. blue mountain — on 2nd December, 2005 at 2:26 pm  

      Lol…You downgraded me from Hindutva types to Right wing. But still I do not have any wings.I am not bound by any “ism”,”va”,”wing” or any political types.

      ….bring in Pakistan when Bangladesh goes through an Islamic terrorist crisis

      Why do Bangladeshi Islamists go to Pakistan ? What did Bangla Bhai and their ilk do in OBL’s camp ? I guess they went there to learn about the solidarity and brotherhood of Islam

    20. Col. Mustafa — on 2nd December, 2005 at 2:31 pm  

      Cos there the thick ones, dont blame all bangers for it.

    21. Siddharth — on 2nd December, 2005 at 2:31 pm  

      Why do Bangladeshi Islamists go to Pakistan ? What did Bangla Bhai and their ilk do in OBL’s camp ? I guess they went there to learn about the solidarity and brotherhood of Islam

      Ah now we’re getting somewhere. This sentence is the answer to the question I asked you in (20). You’ve rightly attributed the increase in radicalism in Islamist fundamentalism to the training they got terrorist camps in Pakistan.

      But again there’s your problem with premise and conclusion. The Terrorist camps in Pakistan are not for the glorification of Pakistan is it? Its Islamic terrorism a lá Osama.

      But because they happen to be in Pakistan - you attribute it to your India-Pakistan border politics.

    22. Siddharth — on 2nd December, 2005 at 2:33 pm  

      Resounding <groan>

    23. blue mountain — on 2nd December, 2005 at 2:38 pm  

      You’ve rightly attributed the increase in radicalism in Islamist fundamentalism to the training they got terrorist camps in Pakistan.

      Great one !!!

      What about the feeling of hostility that Banladeshis have towards India culmaniating in the election win of Islamists?

    24. Siddharth — on 2nd December, 2005 at 2:44 pm  

      What about the feeling of hostility that Banladeshis have towards India culmaniating in the election win of Islamists?

      Islamists have not won any elections. The Jamaat have - but only because of political manouvering and coalition forming. Similar to the political shenanigins in India whereby the BJP take over Parlimantary seats. When that happens, people don’t attribute that to Bnagladesh or Pakistan as the major reason. Likewise, if similar events happen in Bangladesh, its not largely to do with anti-Indian sentiment.

      So, please, stop hogging the argument and stop pandering to your own self-importance.

    25. blue mountain — on 2nd December, 2005 at 2:48 pm  

      Whom are you fooling dude ?

      What was BNP’s slogan in the last elections ?

      Hindu’s would come back to reclaim their property unless you vote for BNP.

    26. Siddharth — on 2nd December, 2005 at 2:53 pm  

      Sure thats happening, but thats sectarianism. I’m not sure how you got India into there. But I believe you’re a bit like the man in Goodness Gracious Me, whereby eveything is “INDIAN!”.

    27. Siddharth — on 2nd December, 2005 at 2:58 pm  

      Move on and grow up. Islamic Terrorism in Muslim countries is bigger than anti-Indian sentiments. Its a pan global phenomenon.

    28. Vikrant — on 2nd December, 2005 at 3:06 pm  

      sid… and your thoughts on Bangladesh’s refusal to accept back its citizens who squat in India? Isnt it because of BNP’s vitriolic anti-Hindu, anti-India stance?

    29. Siddharth — on 2nd December, 2005 at 3:11 pm  

      Dunno, I’m not a spokesman for the BNP.

    30. nukh — on 2nd December, 2005 at 4:16 pm  

      siddarth.
      your argument that the jehadi’s in the sub-continent are not driven tby their hatred for india is risible and a dangerous presumption.
      ergo, you cannot have a discussion on the rise of islamic extremism in bangladesh without mentioning india…..
      indeed, banladesh could very well become the bigger bogeyman for india’s economic growth and security in the near future…i.e. bigger than pakistan.
      bangladeshi’s are puring into india by the millions and the traffic will only increase with the increase in bloodshed.

    31. Vikrant — on 2nd December, 2005 at 4:24 pm  

      Bangladeshis are pouring into India with the left of their commie friend in WB. Bluey are you listening?

    32. Siddharth — on 2nd December, 2005 at 4:31 pm  

      Nukh

      Islamic Fundamentalist activity does draw on anti-Indian feelings but its negligible. Islamists in Bangladesh feel they have bigger fish to fry such as their own domestic issues of trying to turn Bangladesh into an Islamic state, the whole political balance issue in Bangladesh’s parliament and Iraq. India doesn’t figure that highly in those formulations. Sorry mate.

      The rest of your post is irrelevent to the thrust of this post which in my mind how the events in Bangladesh this month could see public opinion finally turn against Islamist Fanaticism in Bangladesh as the latest bombings may have broken the proverbial camel’s back.

      As for the issue of “bangladeshi’s are puring into india by the millions” - another issue, another post mate. Perhaps you could write a PP article about it and we could argue the toss.

    33. nukh — on 2nd December, 2005 at 4:44 pm  

      siddarth, while i agree with your rationale that the jehadi’s primary goal is relevance in the domestic sphere….i was arguing that the surge in fantacism is at least at some level inspired by india. and given indian interests in the region [ natural gas, security and illegal immigration], it is only natural. what i mean is that india is the big boy on the block….so soem of it comes with the territory.

      as an aside - the extemists in b’desh are also driven by the returning citizenry from the middle east, particularly saudi arabia. where they become radicalized in the ways of the wahhabi’s and given the petrol rates……..funding is not an issue either.

      p.s. the pouring bangladeshi’s may compel demobraphic changes, which could be detrimental to the region’s future.

    34. Vikrant — on 2nd December, 2005 at 5:09 pm  

      sorry for the typos.

    35. sonia — on 2nd December, 2005 at 5:32 pm  

      nukh - india plays a part only in as much as it is viewed as being the enemy of pakistan. any islamic-y-ness in bangladesh is wholly tied up with the past and pakistan - some folks just didnt like it that most of us weren’t in the least bit interested in being part of an artificial construct - the islamic state of pakistan - and opted out. some of those folks are still trying to stir things up and in a country with incredible poverty its pretty easy for mad mullahs who give money to a bunch of kids/people who have nothing else to go out and cause trouble. in case anyone didnt know there’s plenty of violence without the pakistan issue anyway - just between the BNP and Awami League. the BNP anyway allied itself with the Jamaat-i Islami which contains some of the old lot who didn’t want us to cede from ‘Pakistan’. so its all pretty complex.

      all political and again religion is a tool used by a bunch of people who would essentially rather the country be pro-pakistani than neutral or pro-indian. 3 stupid countries in the sub-continent cant get over their past differences and thats that. religion and ethnic differences are simply tools of a bunch of people interested in power

    36. nukh — on 2nd December, 2005 at 5:42 pm  

      sad but true…sonia.
      just out of curousity…..does the average banladsesi recognise india’s role in 1971?
      from what i hear, the avg person is in deep denial about indian help fro mukti bahini…..?

    37. Siddharth — on 2nd December, 2005 at 5:51 pm  

      “islamic-y-ness”? any relation to loch ness?

      Sonia: a potted history of the Islamification of BD politics in 4 A4 pages. Very balanced.

    38. Sunny — on 2nd December, 2005 at 7:43 pm  

      Blue Mountain, clearly your shocking lack of knowledge about politics in Bangladesh doesn’t stop you spouting off randomly about the area.

    39. Siddharth — on 2nd December, 2005 at 8:05 pm  

      Sunny, I don’t think he has a lack of knowledge. However he does have his own agenda and a bunch of rigid prejudices.

    40. Tanvir — on 2nd December, 2005 at 9:30 pm  

      The government is in a lot of shit because of these bombings. It does not look good for their standing from the outside world, and nor int erms of public opinion. They dont need this. Neither do Jamaat-e-Islam.

      The whole point of these bombs is to destabalize the government. Who are JMB anyway? They just appeared out of nowhere, and certainly dont have the capacity to take over government.

      But there is one benifactor from all of this. - The opposition Awami League. As soon as the present coalition government came to power, the Awami League’s leader went round the world proclaiming Bangaldesh had been taken over by the Taliban. and all sorts of ridiculous other things, trying to worry a western world already afraid of Islamic extreamism. Belive it or not, outside countries play a huge part in who takes power in Bangaldesh every four years.

      I dont know how much any of you guys know about Bangaldesh, but it is a country where you can buy anything, and do just about anything that comes to your imagination. Arranging a hit on somebody is not that different if you live in Dhaka City although crime has reduces a fair bit in the last few years, but there is still a huge illicit arms problem.

      Political instability in Bangaldesh means greater profit for its neighbours, for some of which, Bangaldesh is like their main market. Tribal separatists groups and other terrorist organisations have been funded and armed by neighbouring states for decades.

      The Prime Minister, Khaleda Zia has wanted talks with the opposition Awami League, but Shiekh Hasina has refused….but continuing to blame the government for terrorism. This is all about cheap politics for Sheikh Hasina. She keep syaing how the Jamat-e-Islam are the biggest terrorists and ‘razakers’ a term used for those who sided with the Pakistanis in the liberation war [ failing to mention that in the mid 90s she actually formed an allaince with them!!]. The same opposition party arrogantly claimed theyr would bring down the government by March 31st [2004]…..they had rounded scores of ruling party MPs who were not likely to get election nominations for next year but couldnt come to a final agreement to get them to walk out - but recently managed to get a ruling party MP to make comments about the government being supporters of terrorism although they overlooked the fact that this same guy had been part of exremist student politics himself at some point and also just had a chil on his shoulder.

      Traditionally, extreame violence has always been a part of Bangaldeshi politics, a big chunk of an election campaign budget for an MP would be for motorcycles and machiene guns… political killings are really common place from both main political parties. The main parties have always been like organised crime, where their election workers, leaders of student wings would take over the orgnised crime in thier respective areas when thier parties came to power.

      Now the stakes have gone up, The Bangaldesh Natioanalst Party have over 200 seats in parliament with thier coalition, and a majority in Parliament with thier own seats alone. The Rapid Action Battalion has reduced crime in the country dramitically - probably one of the biggest winner of public opinion, as well as making progresses with the environment and other infastructural advances in communication.

      But the thing is….The Awami League is the party that was in power when Bangaldesh came to power and has a fixed proportion of the nation as blind,unconditional supporters, they have just lost out because of this alliance between the Islamic parties and the BNP. They need to break this alliance, and coincidentaly, ‘islamic terrorism’ from organisations never heard of before has begun.

    41. Tanvir — on 2nd December, 2005 at 9:33 pm  

      i typed that so quick…apologies for it being littered with spelling errors!

    42. sonia — on 3rd December, 2005 at 2:43 am  

      rubbish. Nukh - the average person in bangladesh realises ( pretty obviously) that without india’s help we would be pakistan today! and for the average bangladeshi the sort of prejudices displayed ( and i do think this isnt a particularly positive mindset) isn’t do with the muslim-hindu dynamic ( though thanks to nasty jamaat e types that’s obviously starting to become an issue) but is still quite an anti-Pakistani bias. Which whilst is understandable as a result of the 1971 conflict but as i mentioned b4 i think the countries in the sub-continent are doing a terrible job fixing their past transgressions against each other and working together for the future ( hollow laugh),

      dhaka is a very violent city. and occasionally when you’ve seen some funny types marching down the street with a pakistani flag shouting ‘pakistan zindabad’..they get down the street, most people give them funny looks. .they get down to the University area ( where the students are highly politicized) and then they try and run off cos they know they will get the shit beaten out of them.. Generally that’s considered an affront to ‘bangladeshi’ patriotism and going back to the self-hating jew metaphor - wandering around with pakistani flags/or expressing ‘pro-Pakistani’ ideas will get you labelled as some kind of self-hating Bengali.

      ( people do like to keep their bees in their bonnets dont they)

      i think the post 9-11 dynamic has affected things somewhat - if anything - that’s what may have made the being muslim thing more relevant. will go and have to read this thingie Siddh sent out.

    43. sonia — on 3rd December, 2005 at 2:52 am  

      well if the BNP is distancing itself from its ‘coalition partner the Jamaat e Islami’ its about bloody time. they shouln’t have been offering them legitimacy all this time and effectively what did allowing them to be a coalition partner do ? allow them into goverment! oh and we always hear about the US not ‘approving’ of having islamic-y parties in power..ooh..but the 2001 elections ( which led to the BNP regaining power with these jamaat types in tow) were apparently ‘free and fair’ and with ‘not much violence’ i swear i never heard such a funny thing ever- i dont know what kind of funny people imagine any election ( never mind which party anyone supports) in bangladesh with all the gundas and mastaans around ‘phree and phair’. lol.

      ( now this is just a reflection of the violence displayed by everyone)

    44. Tanvir — on 3rd December, 2005 at 5:03 am  

      As for the last elections, the pending decision on whether to export cheap gas, and the prospect of American oil companies wining a multi-billion dollar deal to install the gas-pipeline had everything to do with who came to power. However they won their huge majority, the ruling BNP have gained a lot in public opinion from the work they have done and this is why those who are not in power are trying the cheapest lowest methods to return to power. I personally am hoping neither BNP nor Awami League get an outright majority next year, and the Jatiya Party of General Ershad gets around 50 seats, giving him the power.

      As for the loyalties between Indian and Pakistan, traditionally the country was split into two. The Pakistanis tried to wipe out Bengali culture and heritage - saying it was ‘un-Islamic’ - rather than tell the truth that Islam is for all races and creeds and you can maintain your cultural identity - this is what led to the language movement, and further suppression of Bengalis despite being a bigger contributor to the economy is what led to the rebellion. The Indians hardly acted as a peacemaker in the situation, neither did it help Bangladesh out of the goodness of its heart, but foresaw not having to fight a two-front war again, it then did a deal with Sheikh Mujib to integrate Bangladesh with India over time - he was wiped out. I think generally people have made peace with Pakistan, acknowledging the genocide and war crimes were by a military rather than the will of the people, and Musharaff’s last visit to Bangladesh where he publicly recognized the genocide was further steps to the peace. No doubt the anti-Pakistan bandwagon is one the Awami League (known to be funded and controlled by RAW) uses to rally support, but it is old now. No doubt India played a big part in Bangladesh’s independence but that is all but forgotten now. Bangladesh has had terrorism problems for decades, the Islamic militancy one is in fashion now, but political instability in Bangladesh has been pushed for by neighbors for a long time. Bangladesh is the first to promote economic co-operation into he region having founded SAARC but, the more conservative politicians want Bangladesh to develop its basic infrastructure first (just like India did) taking a more open market way of trading later, whilst the Awami League, want a free for all trade system, which effectively means small industries in Bangaldesh not being even able to establish themselves cos they cannot compete with influx of Indian goods.

      Why should the BNP distance itself from the Jamat-e-islam?? by forming the alliance with the Jamat, they brought Jamat into mainstream politics, and allowed the forward thinking politicians of the religious parties to flourish, and it has led to greater integration, and given a huge religious chunk of the country a voice in the civilized and proper manner that it should conduct itself. Its easy to blame the recent acts of violence on all Islamic politicians its pretty much saying it’s the fault of all Muslims.

      The most vocal of all politicians against Islamic extremism has actually been Jamat-e-Islam and Islamic Oike Jote, and their integration in mainstream politics has meant the small minded extremists have been sidelined. The opposition Awami League have talked about extremists a lot more, but nothing constructive, just blaming all their opposition left right and centre for it, and going out of their way to tarnish the countries image internationally just incase people pay attention and help bring them to power again. The funny thing is, when politicians get sidelined in Bangladesh they start to get desperate and do more out of order things, there are no principles involved, the most unlikely alliances form which is why I think the recent outrages have been solely for the purpose of de-stabilizing the government.

    45. blue mountain — on 3rd December, 2005 at 6:16 am  

      Post no. 40 …Tanvir

      Political instability in Bangaldesh means greater profit for its neighbours, for some of which, Bangaldesh is like their main market

      No prizes for guessing who is the sole beneficiary of the troubles in Bangladesh !!

      The fact that Bangladesh is their main market because Bangladesh lacks the ability to produce the goods it consumes.

      Stop crying about trade imbalance . Learn to manufacture goods so that you wont need to import it from your enemy!!

      Post no. 44….Tanvir

      I personally am hoping neither BNP nor Awami League get an outright majority next year, and the Jatiya Party of General Ershad gets around 50 seats, giving him the power.

      Omg!!! This man wants a former ruthless despot who ruled the country with an iron fist to get reelected!!

      All hands on deck!! The ship is sinking!!

    46. blue mountain — on 3rd December, 2005 at 6:28 am  

      Post no. 44 …Tanvir

      No doubt India played a big part in Bangladesh’s independence but that is all but forgotten now

      There you speak the real truth man!!! Thanks for being frank.

    47. Tanvir — on 3rd December, 2005 at 6:56 am  

      Bangladesh does not lack the ability to produce the goods it consumes… but when certain governments act against its own interests (e.g the Awami League) is it any wonder the captains of industry want them out of power? The ruling BNP has always been the party of choice for the businessmen in the country.

      This doesnt need to be a conflict thing, and progressive politics in Bangladesh has shown this, with joint ventures, and giant Indian corporations investing billions of dollars into Bangladesh.

      I think we are seeing good times ahead with the likes of BJP and Awami League out of power.

    48. Vikrant — on 3rd December, 2005 at 7:56 am  

      Sunny my friend its your lack of knowledge about politics in B’Desh that is shocking. These guys are defending BNP…. a party that makes BJP look like a perfectly secular party in comparison. But apologising for Islamists and whipping Hindus is the hallmark of PP isnt it?

      Tavir that was 2 kb worth of bullcox. Let me assure you India doesnt give a damn for the swamp. B’Desh has over past 20 years helped more than 10 militant groups in India’s troubled N East. After BNP came to power unmentionable attrocities have been commited upon ethnic and religious minorities especially Hindus and few remaining Buddhists in Chittagong hills. Awami League and RAW? haha haha thats ridiculous.

      We may have a deabte sometime.. sonny. But i g2g.

      Sunny time for your lesson 1 on Bangladeshi politics.

      http://www.hcrbm.org

      Regards

      Prof. Vikrant

    49. Vikrant — on 3rd December, 2005 at 8:31 am  

      er.. thats http://www.hrcbm.org

    50. Siddharth — on 3rd December, 2005 at 1:39 pm  

      These guys are defending BNP

      LOL. Its your reading-comprehension thats shocking. Where is anyone defending tne BNP? Point out the references pur-lease…

      “First rule of comment box posting: Always misquote and mistranslate other people’s posts in order to ram home your own beliefs even if that means distorting the text of other posters.”

      Looks like you and your mate blue pass rule number one

      Tavir that was 2 kb worth of bullcox. Let me assure you India doesnt give a damn for the swamp.

      I wish that were true. But BlueMountains just spent 30 posts arguing for the right of Bangladeshi Islamic extremists to consider India before everything else! LOL.

      And he can’t seem to get over not Bangladeshis remembering India as part of their daily bread.

      Listen mate, look at your posts. India, in spite of its growing economic prowess, seems to be obsessed with the “swamp” that is Bangladesh. Look at your own input to this thread.

    51. Tanvir — on 3rd December, 2005 at 1:41 pm  

      Hey im glad someone posted the link to HRCBM …what they are about is a small microcosm of what lies behind much of the stories extreamism in Bangladesh.

      A long-established and reputable Bangladeshi blog called alochona [ www.alochona.org] recruited researchers to look into what HRCBM …i promise you it is a very very interesting read if you have the time the report the link is : http://bangladeshunited.alochona.org/bangladeshunited/HRCBM.html

    52. Siddharth — on 3rd December, 2005 at 1:51 pm  

      Vikrant

      After BNP came to power unmentionable attrocities have been commited upon ethnic and religious minorities especially Hindus and few remaining Buddhists in Chittagong hills.

      Vikrant:: Yes thats true. But thats more the handiwork of Islamist Extremists like the Jamaat who are in cahoots with the BNP. Sure, the BNP is sullied by association and they are as much to blame as Jamaat for acting on these crimes. But all in all, your statement is true.

    53. Sunny — on 3rd December, 2005 at 2:18 pm  

      Vikrant, don’t start playing dick size comparisons with me boy or I’ll blow you out of the water like Rohin did before. Nowhere did I defend religious politics, merely that Blue Mountain is so out of his depth, he’s using any silly excuse to justify his prejudice.

      Tanvir says:
      No doubt India played a big part in Bangladesh’s independence but that is all but forgotten now.

      Rubbish, I know plenty of British Bengalis who are still prejudiced towards Pakistanis over Indians because of what happened then and what they perceive now as religious arrogance by Pakistanis.

      The most vocal of all politicians against Islamic extremism has actually been Jamat-e-Islam and Islamic Oike Jote, and their integration in mainstream politics has meant the small minded extremists have been sidelined.
      That still doesn’t take away from the fact that the government has refused to deal with its extremist elements, or done anything to stop the opression of Balngladeshi Hindus.

      You seem to be blaming India for insurgency, without taking into account that the government of India is concerned not only of the illegal immigrants coming into West Bengal and the terrorising of Hindus in the country. Both of which your govt has once again comprehensively failed to deal with. How many Imams have spoken out against that and actually done something about it??

      Blue Mountain
      The fact that Bangladesh is their main market because Bangladesh lacks the ability to produce the goods it consumes.
      Stop crying about trade imbalance . Learn to manufacture goods so that you wont need to import it from your enemy!!

      Stop chatting rubbish all your life man! India had the same strategy of growing infant industries and focusing on ’swadeshi’ goods for ages. There isn’t anything wrong with that when used initially to build up an industry.

      There you speak the real truth man!!! Thanks for being frank.
      Meaning, you both are justifying your own prejudices. Sadly for you though, I’m not about to fall into that trap. Fools.

      Let me assure you India doesnt give a damn for the swamp.
      Yeah, like you speak for anyone but yourself.

    54. Vikrant — on 3rd December, 2005 at 3:23 pm  

      when i made the “swamp” statement, the premise was that Bangladesh really doesnt figure that high on Indias concerns so that RAW would forment insurgencies in B’Desh.

      Tavir you cant treat people like shit and expect them to take it silently. Those Buddhists whom you describe as tribals are more cultured than Jamaat and gang.

    55. Siddharth — on 3rd December, 2005 at 6:20 pm  

      Bangladesh really doesnt figure that high on Indias concerns so that RAW would forment insurgencies in B’Desh.

      Tradewise, BD figures very highly with India. BD is a captive audience for Indian made goods. That Indian made stuff floods in and lovely Foreign FX Dollars flood out of BD. India loves it. The ayuvedic health stuff India makes is great. The ANNarayan elephant brand Neem plant cream got rid of a very embarassing eruption on my bee hind.

    56. Rohin — on 3rd December, 2005 at 6:28 pm  

      “elephant brand Neem plant cream got rid of a very embarassing eruption on my bee hind”

      Thanks for sharing.

    57. blue mountain — on 4th December, 2005 at 7:56 am  

      Blue Mountain, clearly your shocking lack of knowledge about politics in Bangladesh doesn’t stop you spouting off randomly about the area

      I have a relative(maternal uncle) still living in Bangladesh. You know what he is doing ? He is sending his chiledren to India and selling his properties to settle in India to have a peaceful life.So much for Bangladesh being a heaven for Hindus and minorities. Fool !

      Stop threatning a 16 year old. Try taking on Hugh Fitzerald of JW or Charles of LGF and you will end up with blood on your nose.

      Dont forget to delete this post as soon as you see it.

    58. Vikrant — on 4th December, 2005 at 8:22 am  

      erhmmm… Blueda LGF is a bit over the line as far as i’m concerned.

    59. Vikrant — on 4th December, 2005 at 8:24 am  

      bluey todays Hugh special at Dhimmiwatch. Excellent piece i say.

      http://www.jihadwatch.org/dhimmiwatch/archives/009275.php

    60. Sunny — on 4th December, 2005 at 1:01 pm  

      Try taking on Hugh Fitzerald of JW or Charles of LGF and you will end up with blood on your nose.
      Don’t make me laugh. All those idiots do is post one-sided stories on their website. It doesn’t take much to be a bigoted idiot. You can attest to that, can’t you? Wow, you have an uncle in Bangladesh, that clearly makes you so knowledgeable! I have a cousin who lives in Jamaica. That must mean I’m partly black.

    61. Salam Dhaka — on 5th December, 2005 at 3:00 am  

      This whole deal has gone out of control. Jamaat is the invisible hand that’s rocking the craddle. JMB is nothing but another spin-off of Jamaat.

    62. Rezwan — on 5th December, 2005 at 11:05 am  

      Sorry for burging in on the discussion late.

      I think the rhetoric got deviated to get the answers of some burning questions that are inside many Indians- “Why majority of Bangladeshis have Anti-Indian feelings? Why Bangladeshis are ungrateful to India? How come the people who got help from their big brother can possibly not like them?”

      The India-Bangladesh relation is really an enigma to many. You would be surprised to know how diverse people’s opinions and feelings of love and hatred are.

      I think this is primarily due to lack of knowledge and understanding between the people, who are sadly distancing themselves between one another.

      In contrast, since 1947, after the divide of India & Pakistan on the basis of religion, millions of Hindu Bengalis migrated to West Bengal and other parts of India and many Muslim Bengalis migrated to Bangladesh (former East Pakistan). Memories of their roots are still afresh in many migrants and their descendents. These feelings are of love and earnings and they always carry a dream within, to visit their roots to be with fellow Bengalis separated by a border; who share the same language, culture and traits. The Bangladeshis love Indian cloths Indian music, movies and TV channels. The Indian Bengalis love Bangladeshi food, music, cloths. You couldn’t imagine the warmth of this feeling if you had not been close to them. But still in Bangladesh officially Indian movies are not screened in Theatres, In India Bangladeshi TV channels remains taboo in this 21st century.

      There is a huge trade gap between India and Bangladesh, where illegal trade is twice as much in volume as the trade goes in official channel. Bangladesh is not yet self sufficient in producing all the consumer goods it needs. So Indian goods naturally finds their market here legally or illegally. India and Bangladesh share some major water resources. These two countries could benefit so much if they could solve all the border problems, share water resources equally and enhance legal trade with minimal protection.

      India hating is a political stance taken by anti Awami League politicians and pro-Pakistan individuals after the liberation war in 1971. In the liberation war India gave shelter to millions of Bangladeshi refugees and engaged in war with Pakistan for 12 days to help liberate Bangladesh supporting the freedom fighters. Bangladesh is surely indebted to India for that. It was for the great leadership of Sheikh Mujibur Rahman, India pulled out its troops from Bangladesh and acknowledged Bangladesh’s sovereignty. But those who are anti Awami league made a farcical issue that Bangladesh being sold to India citing numerous disputes over the years, which still remains live. They cited the following examples:
      *Indian army took away, all surrendered arms, ammunitions, equipments and vehicles worth millions of US dollars.
      *Bangladesh govt took trade relaxation decisions in favor of India.
      *Bangladesh Government’s decision to print currency notes from India was disastrous as fake notes were abundant and India got blamed.

      Both Awami League and India did not consider paying any heed to such feelings and took no measures to eradicate such sentiment.

      After Mujib’s assasination in 1975, Gen Ziaur Rahman’s government rekindled some border issues and took a stand to uphold Bangladesh’s rights but lack of diplomatic initiatives to solve the differences widened the gaps. A Bangladesh government which was not obviously pro-Indian, as it was under Mujibur Rahman, was automatically dubbed by India, Cold War-style, as being pro-Pakistan.

      These types of stereotyping are being carried over till now. In Bangladesh people general people are naive and sentimental; personal likings dominate logic. They can be easily mislead by the shrewd politicians. That’s why during Awami League government (believed to be pro-Indian) the relationship did not improve significantly but only reduced some tension.

      India-bashing is the powerful political weapon that is now being used by present BNP government.

      But I think the way forward would be to promote more interactions between the people of both the countries.
      Indians need to be generous and be relaistic to conquer the anti-India feeling in Bangladesh. The Bangladeshi think tanks need to be vocal and take measures to reduce the tensions the political leaders are inflicting upon the relationship.

      I believe that all these political rhetorics do not touch people at personal level. A girl in Bangladesh will continue to adore Shahrukh Khan and watch all his movies in pirated discs and girl in India will pay any price to get a Dhakai Sari smuggled through the borders. A Bangladeshi boys favorit tourist attraction would be in Darjeeling and an Indian’s Cox’s Bazaar Beach. I think many of the Bangladeshi politicians who cries against India in a political speech, go home and watch popular Hindi soap operas in Indian Channels and some would send his kid to a school in an Indian hill convent. India-Bangladesh relations will remain so bitter sweet and quite prone to exploitation by the political leaders.

      The Bangladesh-Pakistan relations are much more complex as almost every family has some scar inflicted on them by the Pak Army in 1971. They just can’t forget. Hoever, much of these atrocities were not exposed to the common citizens of Pakistan and the truth is not told to many even after 35 years. When the reconciliations are done then we will find that we are all good humans of flesh and meat and need not bring the two nation theory in front whenever we interact.

      “i want to discuss…and learn…and hear…there are other opinions in this world besides mine…besides ours…i want to understand…why we feel these things…where is it all coming from…where will it all go…”

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