Will Kabaddi encourage you to join the Army?


by Sunny
26th November, 2007 at 9:19 am    

Erm, apparently they think it will.

There is more to the Army’s interest in kabaddi than just sport. The recruitment section is funding the game and the tour. They see it as a way of appealing to young British Asians and encouraging them to sign up as soldiers.

Well, none of the quotes by Army personnell state that so it may amount to the journalist’s take. I can’t think of anything more silly. But the idea of British soldiers playing Kabaddi is funny though. During my first year at university, a huge group of us drove down to Margate for the day. Randomly, we decided to play Kabaddi on the beach while onlookers watched in amusement. Happy days, I tell you.


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  1. Joy1 — on 26th November, 2007 at 11:00 am  

    This typical ill-conceived notion championed by the British Army will not strengthen efforts to encourage people from Asian communities to join. The selection has not carefully been thought through by whoever initially coined the idea.

    In order to make a real difference in recruitment and encouraging greater representation from a wide range of communities, you need to actively demonstrate role models within the service. In addition, the British Army could encourage affiliated associations, for instance, Hindu Army Association, Muslim Army Association and others. These affiliated organisations would serve as a healthy route for new recruits to take. Surely, these affiliated associations may participate in numerous recruitment drives and events, primarily to encourage an army career and thus increase the number of people from Asian and other communities.

    These association could alter the entire racial makeup of the British Army, purely for the purpose that all communities regard the British Army as a career of choice. These associations could further contribute to policy formulation and shaping of Army development, particularly in areas of recruitment and appreciation of different minorities in the army. They should also take their staff associations concerns forward to strategic levels and make appropriate representation to the highest authorities of the British Army.

    That is, of course, my own opinion.

    Thanks

    Joy1- friend of Sunny who is Joy2 hahahaha

  2. Metatone — on 26th November, 2007 at 11:04 am  

    Society works in strange ways. Back when I were a lad, I was sent to a school that played rugby. Rugby was still in the midst of “shamateurism” in those days and if you felt it was your vocation, one way to make a living and be guaranteed time to pursue your sport was to join the forces. Throw in the skills training and possibly a scholarship and there’s the beginnings of something that attracted three or four lads who (IMO) hadn’t quite thought through the implications of being a soldier. But that’s how Army recruiting works…

    Also, strangely, it’s a massively progressive move by the Army, can you imagine 20 years ago that they’d have a team playing some “ethnic” game?

  3. SajiniW — on 26th November, 2007 at 11:16 am  

    Why one would want to play ‘kabaddi’ at work when you’d get a better game at home/on joining the Indian army?

    The average Asian isn’t going to be impressed by this. A token nod to inclusivity is rubbish – proving the army is a caring (Deepcut, anyone?) and tolerant organisation (army types at university are known to be right-wing) is another.

    Quite a few Blasians at school got into the army/RAF through the Combined Cadet Force movement. Would be nice to see this extended to comprehensive schools as I’ve only seen it at grammars and public schools.

  4. Shahzada Jamrud — on 26th November, 2007 at 11:31 am  

    Sunny, you have failed to read between the lines again. Think like the white man, and you will understand.

    Kabadi is by far the most popular sport in the Punjab (East and West); Punjabis were/are considered the prime ‘marital race’ of her majesty’s Empire; the army has made no secret of its desire to enlist Punjabis (they want an exclusive Sikh regiment)…

    The Punjabis love Kabadi (much more than cricket), and the army loves Punjabis because they make excellent cannon fodder.

    Simple.

  5. Cover Drive — on 26th November, 2007 at 12:29 pm  

    This speaks volumes about just how much the army knows about British Asians, the sports they like to play, their aspirations after joining and how inclusive the army is today. I wonder how much research the army conducted before they decided to take up Kabbadi?

    I envisage lines of British Asians queuing up to join outside the army recruitment centres from now on! ;)

  6. Shahzada Jamrud — on 26th November, 2007 at 12:42 pm  

    Cover

    You may mock but go to the Midlands and the North and see for yourself.

    While the white proletariat busy themselves with playing football and attacking old people, the Asian working class hordes spend ridiculous amounts of time playing Kabaddi – especially the Punjabi community.

    There are regular tournaments which involve touring teams coming over from the Punjab. The crowds are always large.

    The army is targeting these Asian working classes – much like the American army targets poor black men.

  7. Bert Preast — on 26th November, 2007 at 1:12 pm  

    The army taught India cricket. Not sure why teaching them kabaddi too is getting a hostile reaction?

  8. justforfun — on 26th November, 2007 at 1:16 pm  

    British Asians maybe? – or maybe its to recruit Asian Asians as well :-) . The Caribean, Fijian etc, Commonwealth Country citizens, can join so why not Indians. The pay will be better than the Indian Army for sure.

    http://www.timesonline.co.uk/tol/news/uk/article589974.ece

    an article 2 years old, but India is mentioned on the bottom of the list as a source of Commonwealth soldiers.

    Justforfun

  9. sonia — on 26th November, 2007 at 1:26 pm  

    “contact” sport says it all. perhaps they think it will encourage men who want to get physical with each other, to think about how the army also would give them plenty of opportunities for more of the same.

    not such outlandish thinking me thinks.

    sod the “racial” make up of the british army – i want to know who they will recruit full stop. given most people have far too many brains to offer themselves up as fodder for the war machine( why do that when you can direct policy? even the liberal interventionists would rather direct policy from an armchair than get on the ground. ok harry and wills dont count, we dont know that they really wanted to go out there) who is actually being recruited for the army? people who dont have too many other choices it would seem to me. it was no surprise to find the army recruiting outside the arndale in wandsworth.

    there is a big problem with recruiting for armies worldwide and quite rightly too. if no one agreed to be dragged in to play the mercenary, well perhaps our silly govts would find it harder to actually implement their war-like plans.

  10. Cover Drive — on 26th November, 2007 at 2:24 pm  

    Shahzada

    I didn’t know Kabaddi was so popular among poor Asians up north. I thought the majority of them were into cricket (like myself).

    Taking up Kabaddi doesn’t seems more like a token gesture to me. I don’t think this is a serious attempt by the army to become more inclusive.

    I know a Nepali guy in my company who served in the British Army in the UK. He eventually quit after many years of service because he couldn’t go up the ladder any further. He complained many times of being overlooked for promotion but it was just a case of one man against a big organisation. He was known as ‘PB’ for the whole time he was in the army even though his first name was just two syllables long.

    For those Kabaddi loving poor Asians who want to join, good luck to them. Hopefully the game will help them to enjoy their time in the army!

  11. Colonial Jai — on 26th November, 2007 at 2:44 pm  

    Ah, yes, kabaddi. You know, this reminds me of a delightful conversation I once had with the Maharajah of Kishanpur while on a Grand Tour of the local gentlemen’s clubs.

    “Jaswant Singh, old fruity”, I said, discreetly depositing the remains of my paan into the silver spittoon whilst handing another 20 pound note to Tiffany as she acrobatically hung upside-down from the pole. “Tell me more about kabaddi, this legendary martial art form which is so popular amongst our sepoys from The Poonjab”.

    “My dear boy”, replied the Maharajah, “it’s a lot like the venerable Ottoman sport of oil wrestling, except it’s much more manly, hairier, and with absolutely no homoerotic overtones whatsoever”.

    “You mean those fellows aren’t allowed to stick their hands down each other’s shorts in order to, ahem, get a better grip ?” I asked, caddishly twirling my moustache at Tiffany and wondering if I could sneakily bypass the no-touching rule while the bouncer wasn’t looking.

    The Maharajah almost choked on his brandy. “Good Lord, no”, he spluttered. “We don’t do that sort of thing over here. All that grabbing, grunting and groaning is a sign of machismo, not an excuse to cop a feel. This isn’t your old boarding public school in England, y’know.”

    I made a mental note to update the Foreign & Colonial Office about this via my Blackberry that evening.

    “Do you think that promoting kabaddi could encourage the recruitment of Indians into our Army — you know, so they could serve King & Country ?” I cautiously asked, realising that my white flannel suit wasn’t hiding the impact of Tiffany’s gyrations. I nonchalantly placed my pith helmet on my lap.

    “What a delightfully jejune suggestion !” he scoffed, sipping on his hookah and apparently not noticing how close I was to a potentially catastrophic failure in diplomatic decorum. “Exactly how naive do they think we are ?”

    “Indeed”, I replied, glancing out of the window at the massed sepoys enforcing British rule over the native hordes.

  12. Cover Drive — on 26th November, 2007 at 2:45 pm  

    Sorry I meant:
    Taking up Kabaddi seems more like a token gesture to me….

  13. Shahzada Jamrud — on 26th November, 2007 at 3:00 pm  

    Of course it’s token, and pathetic. But I was just explaining to you the thinking behind it.

  14. nodn — on 26th November, 2007 at 3:02 pm  

    “I can’t think of anything more silly.”

    Can’t put it better myself… so I didn’t!

  15. bananabrain — on 26th November, 2007 at 3:16 pm  

    kabaddi was one of the first things they showed on channel 4 and i really got into it, not least because it seemed mostly to be played by teenage hotties in tight t-shirts and they were always getting into fights. ah, my salad days.

    actually, when i took a group of 16 year-olds on a tour of israel for my youth movement about 17 years ago, i taught *them* kabaddi – they really got into it, too. i think it would be a great thing to encourage.

    the other thing, of course, is that i believe it was kabaddi that inspired douglas adams to invent “brockian ultra cricket”, where the object is to hit your opponent very hard on the head and then run away.

    b’shalom

    bananabrain

  16. Cover Drive — on 26th November, 2007 at 4:24 pm  

    Oh yes. Good cannon fodder.

  17. Pounce — on 26th November, 2007 at 6:52 pm  

    So the BBC issues a story about how the British Army is taking up kabaddi in which to recruit the ethnic minority in the Uk.
    Utter Tosh.
    The Sport was witnessed by a number of British Soldiers in the Uk, they liked what they saw and took it up. They are in India not for recruiting as the BBC article alleges but rather to get some solid training in with the masters of the game before the kabaddi European championships to be held in January. But hey don’t take my word for it here is how the story has been reported by the Indian press;
    http://www.indianpad.com/story/140534

    http://www.expressindia.com/latest-news/Kabaddi-is-like-rugby-but-without-a-ball/239816/

    http://hcilondon.net/hciserv/NewsIndex?source=newsdetails&NewsCode=6024

    Even the British High Commission paints a different story than the BBC version;
    http://www.britishhighcommission.gov.uk/servlet/Front?pagename=OpenMarket/Xcelerate/ShowPage&c=Page&cid=1059738704019&a=KArticle&aid=1194715083345

    Now having done a number of sports in the BA (Mountaineering, Boxing, Karate, Judo, orienteering) I can vouch for how one of the benefits of taking up a physical interest in the forces is the chance of an overseas tour in which to represent the army and the country.. Bloody Hell I’ve friends who’ve visited Australia on Rugby and Hockey tours. Kabaddi is no different. However from the posts I’ve read from a very small but vocal minority it appears you have nothing but scorn for those who opt to wear the uniform of this country. Remember at the end of the day they serve this country and not as you lightweights presume the country serves them. Painting them as dim-witted, Council Estate trash and warmongers merely tells me that you people who have no problem castigating them as such have become what you hate the most;
    “Narrow minded racist bigots”
    Now here is what I look like just in case one of you oxygen thieves decides to say I’m not who I say I am.
    http://img516.imageshack.us/my.php?image=image1as1.jpg

    Once again shoddy reporting from the BBC.

  18. Bert Preast — on 26th November, 2007 at 8:39 pm  

    Sadly, blanking out eyes and cap badge won’t ever convince anyone you’re SF. You simply don’t have the issue ‘tache.

  19. pounce — on 26th November, 2007 at 10:13 pm  

    Bert wrote;
    “Sadly, blanking out eyes and cap badge won’t ever convince anyone you’re SF. You simply don’t have the issue ‘tache.”

    Err Richard Edward point out where I say I’m a crap hat.If the best you can do is that go back to the playground.
    Child.

  20. Sunny — on 26th November, 2007 at 11:57 pm  

    Pounce, that’s what I thought too. The BBC’s line on this story wasn’t that believeable.

    Painting them as dim-witted, Council Estate trash and warmongers merely tells me that you people who have no problem castigating them as such have become what you hate the most;

    Aren’t you generalising? I certainly did not say that. My brother was in the British army.

  21. Bert Preast — on 27th November, 2007 at 2:05 am  

    Pounce, I’m RGJ and taking the piss. Wah?

  22. Jai — on 27th November, 2007 at 10:32 am  

    In case anyone didn’t realise it, I was just kidding in post #11.

    I actually think it’s a good idea for more Asians to be in the British military, if that’s something they aspire to joining — as long as a) they’re not used as “cannon fodder”, b) any military expeditions they’re sent on are morally justified, and c) they’re not on the receiving end of racism and prejudice from other members of the military.

  23. sonia — on 27th November, 2007 at 12:15 pm  

    jai a lot of people in the army are used as cannon fodder – unless you’re someone high up -that’s partly the whole point. if you’re not ok with humans being the cannon fodder thing, then that’s completely understandable, but i find it funny that you would only suddenly think of the problems with the army when asians/race suddenly comes into it. and also -the army is actually a violent place to be internally – bullying, etc. (even when there is no race thing to complicate it) deepcut deaths etc. – so again, its very problematic, but hardly suprising given the nature of the work and clearly the two are related, why all the focus all of a sudden just cos some asians are joining?

    wouldnt that be most bizarre? the army has problems full stop, and has serious implications for the humans within.

  24. sonia — on 27th November, 2007 at 12:22 pm  

    11 – was a very entertaining post!

  25. Jai — on 27th November, 2007 at 12:26 pm  

    Sonia,

    but i find it funny that you would only suddenly think of the problems with the army when asians/race suddenly comes into it…..why all the focus all of a sudden just cos some asians are joining?

    There is no “suddenly” in all this. Sunny’s article is about Asians joining the British Army, hence my remarks relating to Asians specifically.

    Concluding that I have no reservations about the negative impact on military personnel from other ethnic groups or am unaware of some of the more negative dynamics involved in the modern military is a considerable assumption on your part, particularly as my long-term commenting on PP has included absolutely no evidence that I hold such views and nothing in my previous comment implied this either.

  26. Jai — on 27th November, 2007 at 12:36 pm  

    PS thanks for the response to post #11 — I used to occasionally write satirical/humorous “Raj-era anecdotes” using that pseudonym when I used to participate on Sepia Mutiny. Do a search on “Colonial Jai” on google/SM and you’ll see the kind of bukwaas I used to write ;)

  27. Soozy — on 27th November, 2007 at 2:58 pm  

    Why the hell would this encourage more British Indians to join the army? British Indians are more into football and cricket than kabbadi.

  28. Soozy — on 27th November, 2007 at 3:09 pm  

    Shahzada Jamrud, more ‘working class’ British Indians follow football and cricket than kabaddi. Anyway, it turns out that this entire story has nothing to do with ‘recruiting British Asians’ and is to do with just concentrating on improving the kabaddi skills of the British Army team.

    I can see that the sport could catch on if it was shown on TV again. It teaches reflexes, stamina, team work and individual work, and is a contact sport, like a running game involving physical strength and nimbleness. You have to be both strong and nimble which is an unusual requirement for a sport.

  29. Cover Drive — on 27th November, 2007 at 3:51 pm  

    Hey Pounce, if you’re still there I think you’re really brave. I’d like to see more Asians in the armed forces, the police and the intelligence services. The more representative they are of Britain the better they will be.

  30. Rumbold — on 27th November, 2007 at 4:53 pm  

    Jai:

    Your post #11 was exceptional. The good old days eh?

  31. Soozy — on 27th November, 2007 at 4:56 pm  

    Yes the good old days of colonialist exploitation and marching into peoples countries and despotically ruling them.

  32. Shahzada Jamrud — on 27th November, 2007 at 5:09 pm  

    Soozy

    Rumbold is the resident neo-con. In addition to being a child and flag bearer of the British Empire, he also has a soft spot for Islamic Imperialism on the sub-continent.

  33. Soozy — on 27th November, 2007 at 5:11 pm  

    Yuck!

  34. Rumbold — on 27th November, 2007 at 5:16 pm  

    Soozy:

    Shahzada Jamrud is our resident Naxalite-Marxist-Khalistani. He enjoys long walks on the beach and fine novels. His favourite colour is purple, and he holds the record for the number of times he has been banned from this site under different names.

  35. justforfun — on 27th November, 2007 at 5:25 pm  

    Bugger – I liked Antoine de Saint Exupéry “Little Prince” and now he will be gone.

    Who was Jamrud?

    Justforfun

  36. Rumbold — on 27th November, 2007 at 5:28 pm  

    Justforfun:

    Shahzada Jamrud is Muzumdar, aka Naxal 1849, aka Homi K Baba, aka Wahisi- the wild one, and half a dozen others whose names escape me.

  37. justforfun — on 27th November, 2007 at 5:30 pm  

    Wiki is my friend – no need for the infil on Jamrud.

    Justforfun

  38. justforfun — on 27th November, 2007 at 5:32 pm  

    Rumbold _ I knew that ;-) , and now ‘he’ will be gone – I liked the name – although “Wahisi- the wild one” certainly has a ring to it.

    Justforn

  39. justforfun — on 27th November, 2007 at 5:48 pm  

    You are correct, I’m not telepathic – but it was an interesting read anyway. I await the next history lesson.

    Justforfun

  40. Colonial Jai — on 27th November, 2007 at 5:49 pm  

    Rumbold Dalrymple,

    Your post #11 was exceptional. The good old days eh?

    Yes the good old days, when one could breathe in the cool air at Shimla with one’s fellow scions of the Empire so far, far away from Ol’ Vilayati and debate the various merits of Angelina Jolie, in-between brandy and croquet and audiences with the Nawab and lapdances and more brandy.

  41. Soozy — on 27th November, 2007 at 5:53 pm  

    Why is someone who supports the British Empire and colonialism and was pro Iraq war part of a blog about progressive Asian culture and politics? That’s what I thought this place was about.

  42. Rumbold — on 27th November, 2007 at 5:56 pm  

    Colonial Jai:

    “Yes the good old days, when one could breathe in the cool air at Shimla with one’s fellow scions of the Empire so far, far away from Ol’ Vilayati and debate the various merits of Angelina Jolie, in-between brandy and croquet and audiences with the Nawab and lapdances and more brandy.”

    Angelina Jolie? Really Jai, I thought that you would have better taste than that. Obviously the native air is rotting your brains. Now Hayden Panettiere- there’s a woman (or Soha Ali Khan, if you want to marry the daughter of a nawab).

    Shahzada Jamrud:

    “This is why I like you – although my respect for you is quickly diminishing with each kiss you furnish Sunny’s arse with.

    You think you know so much, yet you know next to nothing.”

    I am glad to read that you like me- I would hate to be insulted by you (heh).

  43. Soozy — on 27th November, 2007 at 5:58 pm  

    Is he one of those right wingers with an ethnic fetish? A little creepy.

  44. Rumbold — on 27th November, 2007 at 5:58 pm  

    Soozy:

    “Why is someone who supports the British Empire and colonialism and was pro Iraq war part of a blog about progressive Asian culture and politics? That’s what I thought this place was about.”

    I was in favour of the war on the basis of liberal interventionism. I did not say that I supported colonialism, merely that some aspects of the British Empire were good (and some were very, very bad).

  45. Rumbold — on 27th November, 2007 at 5:59 pm  

    Soozy:

    “Is he one of those right wingers with an ethnic fetish? A little creepy.”

    Heh.

  46. pounce — on 27th November, 2007 at 6:23 pm  

    Sunny wrote;
    “Aren’t you generalising? I certainly did not say that. My brother was in the British army.”

    I never pointed the finger at you Sunny and if you took offence then I apologise for the implication. My initial reply was directed at the people in question and their quotes. However on reading it back to myself I came to the conclusion that you wouldn’t have been able to see the woods for the trees? So I used a shotgun post.
    (everybody gets hit)

  47. Colonial Jai — on 27th November, 2007 at 6:26 pm  

    Rumbold,

    Angelina Jolie? Really Jai, I thought that you would have better taste than that.

    That statement alone is worthy of a fatwa. I’d recommend that such impertinence be rewarded with being blown up from the front of a cannon, except that as an enlightened Occidentalist I know that aboriginal Brits have some curious ideas and one must therefore make allowances for such idiosyncracies in the name of Pax Hindustania.

    Now if you don’t mind, I see that I have to get back to the weighty business of Empire, namely continuing my discussion with the Nawab about the delicate beauty of Dia Mirza and Katrina Kaif. One can’t ignore that kind of summons via one’s iPhone, by Jove.

  48. pounce — on 27th November, 2007 at 6:32 pm  

    Bert Preast wrote;
    “Pounce, I’m RGJ and taking the piss. Wah?”

    Now known as the Rifles. My neighbours a WO2 in that outfit not long back from Afghan. Myself I was in the province with the Jackets in the 90s and funny enough was in Dekelia at the same time as them .Yes I remember the Yellow mini moke incident as I did the subsequent lockdown. Hell I remember when they burnt down the Chogi shop one weekend at Alexandra barracks. (Completely changed now)
    I used to hang about with your Provo Sgt.(black guy) went on to do a recruiting stint at Wembley ACIO.

  49. Bert Preast — on 27th November, 2007 at 6:36 pm  

    nonono, you must be thinking of some other mob. We’re lovely chaps, just a little misunderstood now and then.

  50. pounce — on 27th November, 2007 at 6:51 pm  

    Sonia writes;
    “jai a lot of people in the army are used as cannon fodder – unless you’re someone high up -that’s partly the whole point.”

    Do you really think so Sonia, please inform me of the figures that equate as cannon fodder. 1.10,100 or do you subscribe to the notion that casualty figures reminiscent of the great war are still extant. I mean you do claim that if you are high up the chain of Command you get a get out of ‘Cannon fodder’ card.
    Facts the unit with the highest casualty rate (% wise) in the British army is the chaplaincy corp.(sky pilots) then you will find that officers are next in line.
    In fact in Iraq since March 2003 the British have lost (regrettably) 173 military personal. That figure includes 51 who died from accidental causes, illness and suicides.
    http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/in_depth/629/629/3847051.stm
    I regret even 1 death and I mean that also for the poor people of Iraq even going as far to extend that tag to those who have taken up arms. But lets be honest here 173 deaths (and again I state I regret even 1 death) over 4 years is nothing compared to the gun and knife crimes that have transpired in London alone over the same period. I’m not saying Iraq is safe. But people tend to centre on political causes (Not in my name) rather than on problems (operation Trident) closer to home.
    Please feel to respond.

  51. Rumbold — on 27th November, 2007 at 7:51 pm  

    Wazir Jai:

    “That statement alone is worthy of a fatwa. I’d recommend that such impertinence be rewarded with being blown up from the front of a cannon, except that as an enlightened Occidentalist I know that aboriginal Brits have some curious ideas and one must therefore make allowances for such idiosyncracies in the name of Pax Hindustania.”

    Heh- One shelf of Indian literature is worth more than the entire collection of European literature throughout the ages.

    “Now if you don’t mind, I see that I have to get back to the weighty business of Empire, namely continuing my discussion with the Nawab about the delicate beauty of Dia Mirza and Katrina Kaif.”

    Dia Mirza fair enough, but Katrina Kaif? Each to their own I suppose (no room for Priyanka Chopra eh?)

  52. Justforfun — on 27th November, 2007 at 9:42 pm  

    Surely it would be ‘Khan’ for the Mongols as that was their term for King, not Shah, although by the time they got to India they had been civilized by the Iranians and had become a little less blood thirsty. Iran seemed to have that effect on its conquerors.

    Shah is the Phalavi pre-Islamic term for King, as in King of Kings – ShahanShah Yazdgerd III, the last in the line.

    Rumbold – there are many things assumed to be Muslim or Islamic that are not, although they are appropriated as such to get the prestige. Names etc. Just a footnote – ShahanShah is not a direct translation to Emperor, but rather originally a quasi-religious term used to identify the first ‘brother’ amongst ‘brothers’ whoes duty was to expand the realm of the righteousness and truth of Ahura Mazda on this Earth and dimminish the realm of Angra Mainyu , although over the millenia of pre-Islamic Iran the term morphed into its feudal use under the Sassanids as the heiriditary title for the ‘Emperor’ as we would uderstand the term. Then of course after that any tinpot tribal chief was a ShahanShah as the meaning was purely secular. As a conclusion and to amuse Shahzada, I like the term ‘King Emperor’ or ‘Queen Empress’ started by Victoria – as it shows that fine quality, English understatement, the subjugation of ‘Emperor’ by a mere King – A nice touch I think :-) as it brings things full circle.

    Thats my story anyway.

    Justforfun

  53. Colonial Jai — on 28th November, 2007 at 10:26 am  

    Each to their own I suppose (no room for Priyanka Chopra eh?)

    Assuming that you can find a large enough futon, one should always make room for Ms Chopra under the mosquito net along with the aforementioned two memsahibs.

    For those with a fetish for ethnic minorities, however, Monica Bellucci would make an excellent addition to one’s harem. Now there’s a healthy booty that deserves a good spanking, Mashallah.

    Tally-ho…..

  54. sonia — on 28th November, 2007 at 12:21 pm  

    pounce hah i dont claim anyone is escaping cannon fodder, my point is the whole army is fucked, (i wouldn’t fancy being someone ‘high up’ either) but i was thinking of infantry units as opposed to other units of the army which are perhaps not so front line. But still. its a shitty deal either which way. My point was why Jai only concerned about asians being cannon fodder, rather than anyone in the army? ( maybe jai thinks only asians would be the low footsoldiers or something) hence my points. I don’t know what your point is. and i dont particularly care.

  55. Rumbold — on 29th November, 2007 at 12:49 pm  

    Justforfun:

    “Surely it would be ‘Khan’ for the Mongols as that was their term for King, not Shah, although by the time they got to India they had been civilized by the Iranians and had become a little less blood thirsty. Iran seemed to have that effect on its conquerors.”

    And because of the Persian influence they still used ‘Khan’, but to mean Lord (sort of), not Chief, which was why Khan was a title bestowed on Mughal nobles.

    “Just a footnote – ShahanShah is not a direct translation to Emperor, but rather originally a quasi-religious term used to identify the first ‘brother’ amongst ‘brothers’ whoes duty was to expand the realm of the righteousness and truth of Ahura Mazda on this Earth and dimminish the realm of Angra Mainyu , although over the millenia of pre-Islamic Iran the term morphed into its feudal use under the Sassanids as the heiriditary title for the ‘Emperor’ as we would uderstand the term.”

    I never knew that. I always thought it literally translated as ‘King of Kings’. Interesting.

    “As a conclusion and to amuse Shahzada, I like the term ‘King Emperor’ or ‘Queen Empress’ started by Victoria – as it shows that fine quality, English understatement, the subjugation of ‘Emperor’ by a mere King – A nice touch I think as it brings things full circle.”

    It is almost Romanesque. The Romans were happy to use the term Imperator (Emperor), but not Rex (King), because they considered Kingship to be the very embodiement of tyranny, while obviously being and Emperor was fine and dandy.

    Jai- Heh.

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