Visually Impaired British Asians


by guest
1st September, 2011 at 7:50 pm    

This is a guest post by Sarah of Same Difference

Earlier this week, BBC Radio 4’s In Touch ran a programme called Visually Impaired British Asians.

The programme looked at the specific issues affecting British Asians with visual impairments. Research has suggested that South Asians are more likely to have several eye diseases than the general population. However, expectations among their community about what they are able to do are limited.

The programme raised the very important point that awareness of sight loss related diseases needs to be raised among British Asians in order to prevent them. The importance of eye tests was also emphasised.

For several reasons, British Asians may be missing out on support that is available to people with visual impairments. The programme looked at some of these reasons. For example, many older Asians in Britain are unable to speak or read English.

As part of the programme, presenter Peter White spoke to a South Asian adviser for the RNIB, who speaks to patients in their own languages. She raised the point that older British Asians are used to natural, holistic remedies for health problems and may find medical solutions, such as laser surgery, too extreme.

Peter White also spoke to a South Asian social worker who is registered blind herself. She now has her own organisation helping other South Asian people with sight loss. She recalled the case of one woman who could not believe that blind people could leave their houses! This woman, herself, had not been allowed, by her husband, to leave her house. The point was raised that for cultural reasons, South Asians think that if people with sight loss leave home alone, they are not being looked after and protected well enough by the family.

Finally, the point was raised that organisations need to be sensitive to the cultural needs of South Asians.

I found the programme very interesting and very educational. I believe that this is a programme that all British Asians of all ages really need to hear. If you agree, please click this link to listen to it on BBC iPlayer.


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Filed in: Current affairs,Disability






16 Comments below   |  

Reactions: Twitter, blogs
  1. sunny hundal

    Blogged: : Visually Impaired British Asians http://t.co/cKzCjOe


  2. K S Dhindsa

    Blogged: : Visually Impaired British Asians http://t.co/cKzCjOe


  3. earlpalmerstonsmythe

    RT @sunny_hundal: Visually Impaired British Asians http://t.co/2RrZLs4


  4. Noxi

    RT @sunny_hundal: Blogged: : Visually Impaired British Asians http://t.co/fV5AaO6


  5. Francisca Biermann

    Visually Impaired British Asians http://t.co/urchwbW




  1. Roger — on 2nd September, 2011 at 3:05 am  

    “older British Asians are used to natural, holistic remedies for health problems ”
    You mean older British Asians are used to natural, holistic and completely useless remedies for health problems.

    “South Asians think that if people with sight loss leave home alone, they are not being looked after and protected well enough by the family.

    Finally, the point was raised that organisations need to be sensitive to the cultural needs of South Asians.”

    In this case, perhaps South Asian communities need to be sensitive to the abilities and potential of blind people. How far do other people with disabilities suffer from similar prejudices?

  2. Sarah — on 2nd September, 2011 at 12:38 pm  

    Roger- personally, I completely agree with you. Above is just a summary of what was said in a very important radio programme.

  3. pr — on 3rd September, 2011 at 1:14 am  

    from a karmic perspective blindness is thought to be related to illicit lust (adultery) from current or previous lives
    ie. taking away someone’s spouse – homewrecking – nevertheless, we need to have compassion for those with health problems – guide dogs are one of Nature’s most amazing creatures

  4. Abraham Gold — on 6th September, 2011 at 6:56 pm  

    Sunny, you really have to get a life and post more articles otherwise people won’t take you seriously and your mother will insist that you have to get married. I understand she has found a lady with a moustache for you. Wahaapeninnit?

  5. douglas clark — on 6th September, 2011 at 11:05 pm  

    Roger @ 1.

    How much of a completely daft person do you have to be?

    I
    have never…

    breakdown..

    had to…

    choke.

    #

    on anyone’se else words, you evil cunt…

    cause they weren’t you.

    but is is , you lying person, it is what you do.

  6. pr — on 7th September, 2011 at 12:29 am  

    is it true jewesses shave their head hair after marriage or have they been cursed with hairlessness – what about serious diseases caused by eating the remains of a violent torture – kosher – by zeus – it sort of makes sense how they founded their satanic little cuntry on torture and terror -

  7. Sarah AB — on 7th September, 2011 at 7:12 am  

    What an unedifying thread. (I don’t mean the post, which is fine of course.)

  8. persephone — on 7th September, 2011 at 8:59 pm  

    ‘How far do other people with disabilities suffer from similar prejudices?’

    Being metaphorically blind can also be a disability that can lead to prejudice. And if you have that type of condition you should definitely stay at home.

  9. Trofim — on 8th September, 2011 at 8:54 am  

    I cannot resist pointing out an ambiguity:

    . . . South Asians are more likely to have several eye diseases than the general population.

    Can mean either:

    1. There are several eye diseases, such that each one is more prevalent among South Asians than among the general population.

    2. South Asians are more likely than the general population to suffer from more than one eye disease.

    Excuse my pedantry. Blame a training in elementary modal logic.

  10. The British Asian Blog — on 8th September, 2011 at 4:14 pm  

    The post was interesting but what more interesting is the comments. I think the British Asians do suffer in silence but part of the suffering is ill education about the problems and what can be done.

    If the right information doesn’t reach you then you need to step outside and try to find it.

  11. Sarah — on 13th September, 2011 at 11:21 am  

    Trofim- it means the first one.

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