The unaccountable US army


by Sunny
31st August, 2007 at 3:20 pm    

In an official document seen by this newspaper, the Ministry of Defence makes clear that all requests for US service personnel to give evidence at British inquests will be turned down. The new rules will cover the deaths of the three soldiers killed last week in Afghanistan.

Last night the families of the three soldiers killed by a US bomb dropped by an F15 aircraft last week in Afghanistan called on the Americans to release all available evidence on the latest friendly-fire incident for the inquest.

“We need to know if the pilot was feeling hyped up, if he was calm, what he had been told before the operation, what happened on the day. Why is it that our closest ally is refusing to provide the evidence that might explain what happened to Robert? I am sure that if an American was killed in a British attack then those involved would give evidence.”

From The Times. So much for that ‘special relationship’ hey?


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  1. Live Journal

    Live Journal…

    I couldn’t understand some parts of this article, but it sounds interesting…




  1. chrisc — on 31st August, 2007 at 3:34 pm  

    Absolutely disgraceful.

    And what is Gordon “tough guy” Brown going to do about it?

    Nothing.

  2. Owen Blacker — on 31st August, 2007 at 5:47 pm  

    The “Special Relationship” has always been a one-way street. The moment Britain stops fooling itself than it’s anything other than a US satellite with a grander history, the better for all of us…

  3. pounce — on 31st August, 2007 at 5:50 pm  

    Instead of berating the US for the untimely deaths of these poor soldiers. (Which is what a lot of posters who have no time for the British military are doing) as a form of political protest against Americans invasion of Afghanistan and Iraq. Here the questions we should be asking;
    1) Why was the US Air force called to provide close air support instead of the RAF?

    2) Who was the forward air controller on this air strike? How competent was he and what coordinates did he give?

    3) I notice that those who died were all under 21, why wasn’t anybody who was older hurt? My point. A lot of the younger soldiers who haven’t seen much combat may have felt inclined to take a snap with their mobile phones. Could this possible scenario in anyway have contributed to their deaths.

    4) The US use JDAMs munitions. This is a GPS delivery system with an Circular Error Probable accuracy of 13 metres. Combined with the sniper pod fitted as standard on all strike Eagles based at RAF Lakenheath. (The F15 was from there) that CEP will have been much smaller. In other words the GPS coordinates are downloaded to the bomb before it is released. The bomb is guided to the coordinates supplied. That is supplied by the guys on the ground who are under fire. Hence my question about who was the FAC.

    5) Harry black masking tape (politically correct) solutions to the situation in Afghanistan will not suffice. The military have the means to do the task at hand. However in order to get the job done the political will has to be there as well. As of this moment I haven’t seen squat.

    People die in wartime, call me cold call me sad. But it’s true. I spent 22 years wearing green and I knew that somewhere along the line I may die. I haven’t a deathwish and neither do the people who I know who still serve. Yet they know the risks of serving Queen and country. If any blame is to be allocated lets blame the Islamic terrorists who caused this tragedy to happen, lets blame the mandarins in power who never do anything because it costs too much. (Unless it’s an expense account) However trying to paint the impression that the Americans are all Gung ho cowboys is a pathetic attempt in which the Antiwar crowd try to rally support to their cause.

  4. Sunny — on 31st August, 2007 at 6:16 pm  

    However trying to paint the impression that the Americans are all Gung ho cowboys is a pathetic attempt in which the Antiwar crowd try to rally support to their cause.

    Or maybe we want the US army to be more accountable when it makes mistakes?

    I was wondering how long it would take for someone to accuse me of “anti-American bigotry”.

  5. pounce — on 31st August, 2007 at 6:47 pm  

    Sunny wrote;
    “Or maybe we want the US army to be more accountable when it makes mistakes?”

    The US is more accountable than a lot of western armies. It hasn’t said it won’t provide information pertaining to this horrible incident, it has said it won’t be forthcoming in having its servicemen appear in foreign courts. Two different scenarios which your cut and paste goes a long way into blurring into one. A one which tells a totally different story from that presented in the times.

    Sunny wrote;
    “I was wondering how long it would take for someone to accuse me of “anti-American bigotry”.

    Please with the “I’m a victim bit” point out where I call you a bigot and I will apologise. I haven’t so feel no need to.

  6. Leon — on 31st August, 2007 at 7:19 pm  

    So much for that ’special relationship’ hey?

    I don’t think it ever really existed, nations don’t develop relationships, they pursue interests.

    If Britain’s ‘interest’ ever substantially contradicted the US’ we’d find ourself quite quickly amongst the ‘Axis of Evil’…

  7. Sunny — on 31st August, 2007 at 11:34 pm  

    it has said it won’t be forthcoming in having its servicemen appear in foreign courts.

    Which is the problem isn’t it, as I point out.

  8. Clairwil — on 31st August, 2007 at 11:44 pm  

    Surely part of being accountable is facing the courts?
    Like Britain before it America can do pretty much as it likes. In the long run it probably better to have our snouts half way up their bowels.

    Leon is spot on.

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