Another disgusting ‘honour’ killing


by Sunny
27th July, 2007 at 9:11 am    

A 70 yr-old grandmother and her son Sukhdave, 43, were yesterday found guilty of murdering his wife Surjit Athwal. Good news of course, I hope they both rot in jail. There’s still too much of this going on.

Blogger Suz has interesting background perspective on this case, including the difficulty that Surjit’s brother had in raising this issue.

From the onset it was believed she had been killed and those who’d planned it. Jagdeesh and his family have campaigned tirelessly over the years trying to get justice. It was felt the Foreign office wasn’t taking much interest. There was even a suggestion that because she was Asian and not white there was a lack of motivation in getting to the bottom of the matter. The ‘Justice for Surjit’ campaign was set up to put pressure on the British government to do more to get the Indian authorities to thoroughly investigate her disappearance.

To a certain extent this case shows how much impact politicians and the media can have on forcing the authorities to act and properly investigate such cases. I believe that makes it important to keep highlighting each case to ensure this issue is not driven out of the spotlight until it is eradicated. And British Asians needs to be at the forefront of fighting it.


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  1. sofia — on 27th July, 2007 at 11:26 am  

    I know that you’ve put the word ‘honour’ in inverted commas, but why can’t we just move away from this phrase and use something along the lines of shameful killing…or just tell it like it is…cold blooded murder with no excuse or justification…and it’s about bloody time the government tried to do something about this…how many more young women are going to be murdered before something meaningful is done…why isn’t anyone highlighting the levels of women with mental illness,committing suicide and being murdered in certain communities??? How about counting the number of young asian women committing suicide in a small area like Southall…or women who are murdered for falling in love with someone her parents did not ‘choose’ for her…I’ve known so many girls and sometimes guys who are emotionally blackmailed into marrying some idiot they wouldn’t have looked twice at and who they have nothing in common with…part of me blames them for giving in…but their alternative is being kicked out of their homes and being ostracised…i actually don’t think that’s such a bad idea..who’d want to be accepted by people who think freedom of choice is a sin

  2. Galloise Blonde — on 27th July, 2007 at 11:31 am  

    More on the efforts of Jagdeesh Singh who deserves great respect for his efforts over the past nine years.

    Hopefully it will not take nine years to extradite the two other men implicated in the rape/murder of Banaz Mahmod.

  3. curious? — on 27th July, 2007 at 11:41 am  

    should be called dishonour killings

  4. Rumbold — on 27th July, 2007 at 11:44 am  

    As this is about ‘honour’, could we not modify the punishment to increase the stain of dishonour on the family? Clearly, jail is seen as a risk worth taking, but if there was a way for the judge to bring shame on the family, then that might well prove to be a more effective deterrent. Like being forcibly married to a pig or a ferret or something. Obviously, there would have to be prison as well.

  5. sofia — on 27th July, 2007 at 11:49 am  

    funny how ‘honour’ is associated with women and not the pigs that killed these women..what’s honourable about coldblooded murder????
    As for Banaz, they apparantly sexually assaulted her…was this an act of ‘honour’ for them??

  6. Bleh — on 27th July, 2007 at 12:00 pm  

    To a certain extent this case shows how much impact politicians and the media can have on forcing the authorities to act and properly investigate such cases. I believe that makes it important to keep highlighting each case to ensure this issue is not driven out of the spotlight until it is eradicated. And British Asians needs to be at the forefront of fighting it.

    Well said. I would echo Sofia’s points about nomenclature and argue that a moniker such as “mysoginy killings” would be a better term since that’s what its all really about.

  7. Kismet Hardy — on 27th July, 2007 at 12:06 pm  

    All these ‘western’ women who dare to unravel themselves from the hardcore fanatic ties that bind them, please, please, please…

    …when they invite you to a ‘family holiday’ in the Punjab or Pakistan or whatever

    For fuck’s sake don’t go

    :-(

  8. Bleh — on 27th July, 2007 at 12:22 pm  

    I don’t think its as simple as that, Kismet (I wish it was). Many of these women are sucked into a family situation where the psychological and physical pressures are such that it is nearly impossible for them not to go. What maybe is needed is action against such family setups in the first place, and stronger action to prevent women in this sort of situation leaving the country in the first place.

  9. fiz — on 27th July, 2007 at 12:22 pm  

    ‘Dishounour killings’- very key point. does anyone know who coined the term honour killings?

  10. Kismet Hardy — on 27th July, 2007 at 12:28 pm  

    Who coined the term honour killing? The judgemental pricks that believe izzat (read as: gossipping curtain twitching neighbours) is more important than the happiness and, ultimately, life of their own flesh and blood

    Vermin

  11. TheFriendlyInfidel — on 27th July, 2007 at 2:09 pm  

    As far as I understand it is poor translation of izzat killings, a poor transalation because in the west ‘honor’ doesn’t involve killing, let alone your own daughter.

    TFI

  12. The Dude — on 27th July, 2007 at 2:12 pm  

    The scum who would murder their own flesh and blood as a matter of “Honour” for want of a better word, deserve nothing more than our complete and absolute contempt. I do agree with Rumbold on this one. For this crime to be properly dealt with, it has to be done holistically. These animals have to come to know what real dishonour is all about.

    One thing though. For a mother to arrange the murder of her own daughter (or daughter in law) is nothing short of sick. Whatever happened to the sisterhood?

  13. sofia — on 27th July, 2007 at 2:15 pm  

    it’s about power structures within the family…that woman probably thought she could control the daughter in law and when she found out she couldn’t, it was best to get rid, otherwise people in the “upstanding” Asian “community” would stick the knife in…

  14. The Dude — on 27th July, 2007 at 2:24 pm  

    Bleh

    I hear what you’re saying but when it comes to the matter of life over death, I think it really is that simple. When you’re invited to attend your own funeral, you simply don’t go or at least not without a truck load of backup.

  15. fiz — on 27th July, 2007 at 2:28 pm  

    it wouldn’t surprise if the media were the first to use this, same as ‘black on blck’ etc

  16. The Dude — on 27th July, 2007 at 2:46 pm  

    If any “upstanding” person from the “asian community” can tolerate this kind of cold blooded murder, then I say that person is as upstanding as scum. When scum starts preaching to others with their high moral tone about “family honour” etc, then we are all in trouble.

  17. The Dude — on 27th July, 2007 at 2:54 pm  

    Fiz

    Black people don’t kill and murder each other. The animals we call nigga’s…do. Trust me what I say. I’m a black man and I’m sick to my stomach that the media calls these sick, twisted sub-human’s black. Being should never be a mark of shame. Like I said, these scum on a stick are not and will never be “BLACK”.

  18. The Dude — on 27th July, 2007 at 2:59 pm  

    The same must apply to these murdering bastards within the asian community. They must be exposed and driven out for the murdering lowlife that they are. They are not asian. They are not even brown. They are the colour of pure scum.

  19. sofia — on 27th July, 2007 at 3:04 pm  

    well the media is always going to be a double edged sword..on one hand these murder trials need publicity to raise awareness of what the issues are, but then the reporting styles are in most cases sensationalist…why would we expect anything else..the real test comes when due to media awareness, there is some sort of political shift in policy. (which has been the case with forced marriages..a bit overdue.)I think it’s really important to work on two levels here..at govn level and grassroots..with the communities you are trying to target. No domineering whacko parent who thinks his/her “izzat” has been compromised is gonna give a toss about a bunch of laws…it needs change from within the community to have real effect. This isn’t going to happen overnight either, but maybe if community groups were consulted and involved in the planning of policy implementation, then this would be one step towards saving these young women who should have had a chance at life..

  20. Rohin — on 27th July, 2007 at 3:15 pm  

    I also agree with Rumbold and The Dude.

    The problem I see with these types of murders is that (when justice is served) the killers go down – good. But I severely doubt they think what they have done is bad, they’re just sorry to have been caught.

    The rest of the family goes on. Some were complicit to the killing, some said “such a shame, but not my business”, some sympathise with the decision to kill but wouldn’t do it themselves and thankfully in this case, some came forward to the police.

    As time goes by, the jailbirds are forgotten and expunged from the family. The mentality of killing your own daughter/wife is not being challenged enough in the communities where it happens.

    The perceived shame of a girl dating a black man, a wife having an affair, a Hindu marrying a Muslim remains. 1/10,000 result in murder and make the news, but there are countless Asian families where ‘shame’ and ‘honour’ ruin people’s lives.

  21. Jai — on 27th July, 2007 at 3:29 pm  

    Something that makes this entire abhorrent business even worse in my view — speaking as a Sikh myself, although not the strictly-practising type (eg. no beard/turban etc) — is that the grandmother concerned deliberately wears the outward affectations of a pious member of her faith, in terms of her manner of dress etc (from the photos I’ve seen, she appears to be keeping her hair completely covered with some kind of patka underneath her dupatta). These outward symbols represent certain tenets of Sikhism, and the person wearing them is really supposed to aspire to embodying the faith’s ideals; so in the case of this woman, the hypocrisy is quite staggering, because she’s completely gone against some of the most fundamental humanitarian teachings of the religion whilst outwardly pretending to be the opposite. It’s exactly the kind of behaviour that the word “paakhandi” refers to.

    Sunny, I’m sure you understand what I’m talking about here.

    Surjit’s brother Jagdeesh is a real hero though. You’ve got to admire him for his courage and tenacity.

  22. The Dude — on 27th July, 2007 at 3:34 pm  

    As a youth I was lucky enough to have dated a Asian girl, with her parent’s consent. It was her uncle, aunt and cousins that had the problem. Alas skulls had the be broken for sense to prevail. It seems to me that not enough skulls have been broken for this kind if foolishness to be still carrying on.

  23. Rohin — on 27th July, 2007 at 3:36 pm  

    Jai, it’s the same as all the Muslim clerics who preach hatred – they LOOK more Muslim than anyone. Likewise shiv sena, likewise…well Christian and Jewish fundas don’t wear much to set them apart, do they? Maybe a slightly bigger cross or kipur than normal.

  24. Rumbold — on 27th July, 2007 at 3:39 pm  

    Jai:

    ‘Paakhandi’. Is there a literal translation?

  25. Jai — on 27th July, 2007 at 3:45 pm  

    Rohin,

    Jai, it’s the same as all the Muslim clerics who preach hatred – they LOOK more Muslim than anyone.

    Correct, although in this case, Jagdeesh also has all the outward symbols (quite orthodox forms of them, interestingly), and in my view he’s the one who’s behaved according to the ideals all this represents, at least in terms of his fight to achieve justice for his sister. Good for him; at least he got the basic point of it all.

  26. The Dude — on 27th July, 2007 at 3:45 pm  

    Jai

    Thank you for the education. My blood ran cold on reading your post and fully understanding it’s meaning. I thought that “izzat” was the result of the simple minded and easily corrupt taking the moral high ground. I was wrong. Honour killings is the complete subversion of good over evil and that’s really, really scary.

  27. Jai — on 27th July, 2007 at 3:48 pm  

    Rumbold,

    ‘Paakhandi’. Is there a literal translation?

    It basically means “false piety”, or “religious hypocrite”. Someone who puts on a show of being very pious, but actually doesn’t have the spiritual awareness that they pretend to have.

  28. The Dude — on 27th July, 2007 at 3:48 pm  

    ……Which makes what Jagdeesh did and his fight for justice even more commendable. This is one brave and rightous dude.

  29. Jai — on 27th July, 2007 at 3:53 pm  

    The Dude,

    The problem is that the word “izzat” basically translates as “integrity”, but it can also have overtones of “honour” in the sense of “pride”, eg. you have offended my honour, honour demands satisfaction, etc etc.

    So it’s a lot to do with people’s egos, not necessarily their integrity in the real sense (despite what they may claim). It’s all about pride in the negative sense, ultimately.

  30. Rumbold — on 27th July, 2007 at 4:00 pm  

    Thanks Jai.

    Jagdeesh stuck up for his sister’s memory at great personal risk to himself (one suspects). The sort of behaviour that makes one proud to be British. Yet, when the honours list comes out, I am sure that he, and others like him, will not even get a mention, as all the MBEs and OBEs will have been taken by England footballers and soap stars. The sort that got invited to Chequers by Tony Blair.

  31. sofia — on 27th July, 2007 at 4:01 pm  

    it also translates as respect/dignity…and in many societies, rightly or wrongly is upheld by the women of that particular society.
    I for one am sick and tired of women being upheld as anything apart from human beings with as much right to life as the next person regardless of their gender etc etc…

  32. Jai — on 27th July, 2007 at 4:06 pm  

    Jagdeesh stuck up for his sister’s memory at great personal risk to himself (one suspects). The sort of behaviour that makes one proud to be British.

    Agreed, and simultaneously Jagdeesh has proven himself to be a true Sikh too. This type of bravery, integrity, and willingness to fight for the sake of the innocently victimised is exactly the sort of thing that the faith is supposed to be all about. It must have taken some serious guts for him to have persisted with this for so long, quite probably in the face of considerable opposition from some quarters as you’ve mentioned yourself.

    And you’re correct that he deserves some kind of formal recognition for his actions.

  33. Rumbold — on 27th July, 2007 at 4:12 pm  

    Do you think that we should start a petition on the Number 10 website for him to be honoured? He may not want to be mind, but if he does/is indifferent then he is surely the ideal role model to hold up and say that ‘honour’ killings do not have to be met by a wall of silence in the ‘community’. It would also counter those odious racists the BNP their admirers who seem to think that immigrants are nothing but bad news for this country.

  34. sofia — on 27th July, 2007 at 4:34 pm  

    i’m not sure about honouring one person when so many others are struggling to overcome adversity by themselves…although I do understand the need to promote in some public way the work that Jagdeesh has done

  35. Rumbold — on 27th July, 2007 at 4:38 pm  

    I take your point Sofia; I was not trying to make out that less high-profile persons deserved less credit, just that if people did start to get genuine recognition for standing up to ‘honour’ killings things may change for the better.

  36. sofia — on 27th July, 2007 at 4:51 pm  

    Rumbold, I do think it is important to recognise people for their efforts in this area…I don’t think a petition is the correct way…I’m thinking more of writing to the political representatives in Hayes to see if there is something substantial that can be done in that area. If you go on the Hillingdon website there is a new inter faith group that has been set up. Maybe these people can be approached to start some sort of discourse on the issue of Asian women being murdered by their family members.

  37. sofia — on 27th July, 2007 at 4:55 pm  

    i’m just so tired of this kind of stuff happening…i remember going past the house of another Asian woman who was murdered by her brother and cousin…her house is now empty with boards covering the windows…and i just remember my little niece asking why that house looked so sad…i felt at a loss to explain to a 5 year old what had happened in that house…

  38. The Dude — on 27th July, 2007 at 5:50 pm  

    This story illustrates one universal truth.

    There is nothing in the universe, nothing either in this world or the next that is greater than the power of love. I don’t know if a brother needs a medal for “honouring” the memory of his sister. What I do know was that his love for his sister was much greater than the the evil that murdered her.

    Like Sunny I hope that both gran-mother and son rot in jail. But I don’t think that the punishment should stop there. Sofia, I can’t say that I understand your anguish. I just hope that the actions of Jagdeesh is proof enough than not ALL black men are bastards. Some of us are honourable in the best sense of that word.

  39. Clairwil — on 28th July, 2007 at 1:33 am  

    ‘Do you think that we should start a petition on the Number 10 website for him to be honoured?’

    Why not? His fight against the injustice of what happened to his sister deserves recognition and weren’t Stephen Lawrence’s parents honoured?

  40. douglas clark — on 28th July, 2007 at 7:08 am  

    Yes, why not indeed?

    The Dudes post at 38 is completely valid. As Clairwill says it would be a correct use of the honours system compared to some of the shit that has, allegedly, happened recently.

    Good actions should be recognised, I think….

    btw, it would be interesting to see if a peoples choice actually made a difference to the stuffed shirts that seem to hand out these things.

    I’ll put the petition up if I get some support here.

  41. douglas clark — on 28th July, 2007 at 7:23 am  

    Something along the lines of:

    In recognition of fundamental humanity and concerted efforts, we, the undersigned would urge the honours committee to enoble Jagdeesh Singh. He would clearly be an asset to the House of Lords.

  42. douglas clark — on 28th July, 2007 at 8:08 am  

    Anyway,

    I’ve just gone ahead and done it. Hopefully it’ll be up as a petition shortly. Please consider signing it.

  43. Rumbold — on 28th July, 2007 at 3:56 pm  

    Well done Douglas. It has not come up yet on the website, but that is presumably because it is a Saturday.

  44. Chris Paul — on 28th July, 2007 at 7:54 pm  

    Think Suz is off on one there.

  45. Joe — on 28th July, 2007 at 9:39 pm  

    Yes lets call it what it is.
    This recent story appears to concern Sikhs – it was Sikh family murder.

    It usually concerns Muslims – that was the last case. That was Muslim family murder.

    In both cases, its correct to identify the culture and idelogy where it happens.

    Name and shame this depraved sickness for what it is. And its usually aobut Muslims.

  46. Hyder Abbasi — on 29th July, 2007 at 12:36 am  

    I found this case to be especially disturbing as both mother and son colluded to murder this young woman.

    Very sad.

    Although many cases of ‘honour’ killings (that are reported) involve Muslims, I would argue that this is more of a cultural practice, rather than religious.

    Out of all the Muslim cases, it seems that the protagonists all hail from the Sub-continent. Thus I believe it is a South-Asian cultural ‘practice’ and certainly not something espoused by the Islamic faith.

    I have not read/heard about Moroccans, Indonesians, Jordanians or any other Muslims that originate from countries other than the Sub-Continent, being involved in such crimes.

  47. Hyder Abbasi — on 29th July, 2007 at 12:42 am  

    To imply that Sikhism or Islam encourages such brutality amongst adherents of these religions is fallacious and must be rejected.

  48. douglas clark — on 29th July, 2007 at 12:49 am  

    Rumbold @ 43:

    This was the petition, err, after I cleared up some formatting issues, but not content:

    http://petitions.pm.gov.uk/Jagdeesh-Singh/BPzZ2RCLgDT6A9WOMDAPUzE

    Your petition reads:

    “We the undersigned petition the Prime Minister to recognise through the honours system Jagdeesh Singhs fundamental humanity and concerted efforts on behalf of his sister. He would clearly be an asset to the House of Lords.

    Jagdeesh Singhs sister was brutally murdered in a so-called ‘honour killing’. His tireless efforts on behalf of his sister are in the highest traditions of humanitarianism.”

    As I understand it this is not an agreement to post it on their web site, real people have still got to agree it is not offensive and stuff. And I should probably have asked Sunny to sub-ed it. The idea is there, the sentiment isn’t. Dammit. It is too damn dry.

  49. Raul — on 29th July, 2007 at 1:11 am  

    A better translation of izzat would be pride, self righteousness, moral hypocrisy. Primacy of Izzat/honour/shame is a hallmark of primitive societies and cultures boasting a collective morality but totally lacking in individual integrity and self awareness.

    Here pretense is more important than reality, this is morality of the soapbox variety, where pious can co-exist with evil seamlessly, where the most religious can also be the most corrupt, priest at 12 pm and rapist at 12am, intolerance and insularity masquerading as virtuosity, spiritualism a cover for reckless greed and materialism. The more extreme the contrast the more intense the need to claim the moral high ground.

    Indian, Pakistan, arab cultures all have elements of this, when people spout terms like Indian culture, values they betray the same mentality.

  50. douglas clark — on 29th July, 2007 at 1:22 am  

    Raul,

    You could say exactly the same about the Catholic Church. Or, depending on belief, bloody Protestants.

    Your post takes the biscuit for most ridiculous post of the week, imho.

    Go on, prove me wrong. You are just being rational, aren’t you?

  51. Raul — on 29th July, 2007 at 10:46 am  

    Hey Douglas, don’t be pompous, this is discussion not a forum for self-appointed arbiters of good and bad posts.

    Back to the topic this was about honour killings prevalent in the societies I referred to, where does the catholic church and the protestants come into this? Do you have insight into that apart from offering me biscuits?

  52. Hyder Abbasi — on 29th July, 2007 at 11:43 am  

    Raul said:

    “Indian, Pakistan, arab cultures all have elements of this, when people spout terms like Indian culture, values they betray the same mentality.”

    Can you elaborate on this please.

  53. justagal — on 29th July, 2007 at 12:10 pm  

    Official, high profile recognition of Jagdeesh’s efforts could come off as being quite patronising and reinforce negative ideas that wider British society holds about ethnic minorities, ie, that there are only a few individuals who value their female relatives higly enough to fight for justice for them and that the characteristic of mercy is sadly wanting amongst those communities in which honour killing is a problem. I do not believe this to be the case but I don’t think the average white person would take into account the background of severe opposition to which people like Jagdeesh Singh are subject.

  54. justagal — on 29th July, 2007 at 12:19 pm  

    Hyder Abbasi:”I have not read/heard about Moroccans, Indonesians, Jordanians or any other Muslims that originate from countries other than the Sub-Continent, being involved in such crimes.”

    Honour killings are also a problem in countries like Jordan, Iraq and Palestine. I have also read that in some countries thhe legal system deals very leniently with those who kill for “honour”. In a few of cases the perpetrators have been Christian Arabs, so it is not an entirely Muslim problem.

  55. Hyder Abbasi — on 29th July, 2007 at 3:41 pm  

    Hello Justagal,

    Thank you for your insight.

    Can I ask where you’ve read about such cases? I’d be very interested.

    Do you know if Arab Muslims have been involved in ‘honour’ killings in Britain?

  56. Rumbold — on 29th July, 2007 at 5:02 pm  

    Justagal:

    The whole point of campaigning to honour Jagdeesh Singh was to try and raise awareness of this issue. How does highlighting his case reinforce negative attitudes towards ethnic minorities? He comes across as a thoroughly decent individual, a credit to his country and his religion. There is a certain culture of silence when it comes to honour killings- for which those who stay silent must take some of the blame.

    Douglas:

    You did not need anyone to edit the petition. It sounds just fine.

  57. Boycotted — on 30th July, 2007 at 4:54 am  

    Hyder Abbasi:

    Lynn Welchman at SOAS published a book about this recently – it covers the practice in many regions, including those mentioned in Justagal’s post. I don’t know about whether there are cases involving Arab families based in UK – I’ve only heard of UK cases involving Kurdish and Sub-cont. families.

  58. Galloise Blonde — on 30th July, 2007 at 9:18 am  

    Police stats identify honour crime in Arab and Eastern European communities in the UK. And as a service that offers Arabic language support, we certainly deal with clients in the UK from Arab families.

    Douglas: I support your petition. But can you give me a proper link to it?

  59. douglas clark — on 30th July, 2007 at 10:42 am  

    Galloise,

    I will as soon as I find it myself! What happens is you submit a petition, a robot replies to you to confirm that you are who you say you are and says it is awaiting ‘moderation’

    Mine seems to be at that point at the moment. It is, perhaps, a sensitive issue right now?

  60. Galloise Blonde — on 30th July, 2007 at 10:49 am  

    No problem! If you want to write a short statement of the petition’s aims etc you can send this to me along with the link when it arrives and I’ll put it up on my sites to give it a bit of a start.

  61. douglas clark — on 30th July, 2007 at 11:07 am  

    Galloise,

    Thanks, will do.

    Rumbold,

    Thanks for your comment too.

  62. douglas clark — on 30th July, 2007 at 6:50 pm  

    For anyone who is interested, the petition is now up on the Downing Street web site, here:

    http://petitions.pm.gov.uk/Jagdeesh-Singh/

    The text is unchanged, viz:

    “We the undersigned petition the Prime Minister to recognise through the honours system Jagdeesh Singhs fundamental humanity and concerted efforts on behalf of his sister. He would clearly be an asset to the House of Lords.

    Jagdeesh Singhs sister was brutally murdered in a so-called ‘honour killing’. His tireless efforts on behalf of his sister are in the highest traditions of humanitarianism.”

  63. Don — on 30th July, 2007 at 7:15 pm  

    Done.

  64. Cath — on 30th July, 2007 at 7:55 pm  

    They’ve changed the name in Kurdistan from “honour killings” to “deliberate murder”, maybe we should consider a name change along those lines?

    “Kurdistan: ‘honour’ violence attack sparks law change.
    Shawbo Rauf Ali, 19 was beaten to death at a family picnic by her husband and several other men. Her husband suspected she was having an affair because an unknown number appeared on her phone. Her murder is among many killings in the name of ‘honour’ in the region.

    The killing sparked several demonstrations highlighting violence against women in the region. Yusef Aziz, minister for human rights in the Kurdistan regional government said, “This phenomenon of violence against women has become very dangerous and is on the rise” adding that a long term strategy is essential, involving “raising society’s awareness of women rights, education, and passing new legislation to better protect women’s rights”.

    Already authorities have taken ‘decisive measures’ towards honour killings including redefining the language to reflect the severity of the crime. Previously men who were involved in honour killings were not directly charged with murder. Now, under new legislation the term ‘honour killing’ has been removed and replaced with ‘deliberate murder’ which ensures punishment of life imprisonment or execution.”
    Source: IPS News, http://www.ipsnews.net/news.asp?idnews=38582

  65. Galloise Blonde — on 30th July, 2007 at 10:38 pm  

    And they probably threw Shwbo’s six month old baby in Lake Dokan because she disappeared on the same day. I hope she didn’t live to see that. Her husband lives in Birmingham, he flew over with to commit the murder. He actually even confessed to it live on Paltalk on a webcam and was recorded doing so by the site admins, and it was on kurdistan.net and all over.

    The demonstrations were not related to the Shwbo case, but the public stoning of Du’a Khalil also by Kurds (Yezidi, not Muslim) which was beyond hideous. You can find footage of this in many places; hundreds of men took part and filmed it on their mobile phones, which circulated the country and wound up on the internet. I don’t recommend watching it.

    I don’t think you can say they have renamed ‘honour’ killing — I think the article refers to the change in the legal code which happened in (IIRC) 2002. Previous to this, and still in the rest of Iraq, killers who claim ‘honour’ as a defence serve very much reduced sentence. This is technically no longer the case in Iraqi Kurdistan but as you may see, as in Turkey, this has led to a rise in ‘suicides’.

    Douglas: I’ll need to write a short intro to your petition then I’ll publicise it.

  66. Galloise Blonde — on 30th July, 2007 at 10:42 pm  

    Sorry, I should have said that her husband is accused of the murder and is assumed to have flown over to commit the murder and seemed to have confessed to it on Paltalk. I should know better than to make statements like that.

  67. Cath — on 30th July, 2007 at 11:38 pm  

    Thanks for that Galloise Blonde. I’d read about the Du’a Khalil case, but I hadn’t realised about the baby. This just gets worse, if that’s possible. Jeez.

  68. Galloise Blonde — on 31st July, 2007 at 12:22 am  

    Article on Shwbo adapted from Kurdish language sources.

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