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Telegraph pays for lying

Posted By Sunny On 12th February, 2007 @ 3:33 pm In Media, Current affairs | Comments Disabled

In case you missed it the Sunday Telegraph [1] apologised yesterday for making untrue allegations about Samih Ahmad in connection with the “liquid bombs” and “terror in the skies” arrests. Shameful journalism. And they had to pay libel damages.

Worth reading today: Dr Klug’s [2] comeback on IJV and Yasmin Alibhai-Brown’s article [3] of support.


Comments Disabled To "Telegraph pays for lying"

#1 Comment By Leon On 12th February, 2007 @ 4:27 pm

The Yasmin Alibhai-Brown piece was interesting, especially the news of the British Muslims for Secular Democracy (they have a website: [4] http://www.bmsd.org.uk/).

Look forward to hearing more about that in the coming months…

#2 Comment By Anas On 12th February, 2007 @ 8:03 pm

Howard Jacobson had a go at the IJV, so I have a go at him on my blog:

[5] http://anask.wordpress.com/2007/02/12/howard-jacobson-and-the-ijv/

#3 Comment By Kobayashi Khan On 12th February, 2007 @ 8:43 pm

Thanks for the link Leon, it looks very interesting. Not many groups out there expressing and representing the viewpoints of secular-minded Muslims.

#4 Comment By Leon On 12th February, 2007 @ 8:53 pm

Just seeing the words secular democracy from a faith org fills me with hope…

#5 Comment By William On 12th February, 2007 @ 11:30 pm

I always thought Howard Jacobson wanted to avoid the I/P issue, or the who’s land is this issue! as he once put it. At least he seemed that way at one time. How things change.

#6 Comment By William On 12th February, 2007 @ 11:34 pm

Thanks for the link Leon, it’s good to see another Muslim organisation especially this addition. Is shows yet again the diversity of Muslim outlook.

#7 Comment By Chairwoman On 13th February, 2007 @ 9:37 am

William - Howard Jacobson, like myself, has got older, and can’t run as fast as he could :-)

BTW as an author, he captures the atmosphere of ’50s Jewish homelife better than anyone I have ever read. My cousin, who is a contempory of his from Manchester finds that she can almost ‘taste’ his books set in that period.

#8 Comment By William On 13th February, 2007 @ 10:44 am

Chairwomen.

Let you into a secret. Howard Jacobson used to be our English lecturer on a mature students undergraduate course at Wolverhampton Poly in the early 80’s. He wrote a book called Coming From Behind. Those from the college who read it new straight away that it was based on the Poly and the characters in the college.

He gave me crap grades but he really was a person I admired. His intellect and charisma that is.

Could tell people a few stories about old Howard but I’ll keep it zipped!!!

#9 Comment By Chairwoman On 13th February, 2007 @ 10:51 am

William - I think there are more than a few authors who base their works of ‘fiction’ rather more than losely on their own experiences.

While it can make for good reading, it causes me to have concerns about Stephen King’s life.

#10 Comment By Tim Ireland On 13th February, 2007 @ 12:51 pm

Heh. I’m right now re-reading one of King’s few decent works; ‘The Long Walk’… and even in this all-male cast there appears to be a significant dig at an ex-girlfriend.

#11 Comment By Katy On 13th February, 2007 @ 1:14 pm

King’s few decent works

Ooh, that’s a bit harsh. I suppose his books can be a bit too long sometimes, and some of his later books lack the edge of the earlier ones (Cell = excellent; Lisey’s Story = mediocre, in my humble opinion). But then all of those criticisms could easily apply to Dickens too - who was also derided for having the cheek to be broadly popular. The Long Walk is definitely one of his best, though.

#12 Comment By Chairwoman On 13th February, 2007 @ 1:20 pm

And The Stand.

#13 Comment By Kismet Hardy On 13th February, 2007 @ 1:41 pm

The Stand, Shining, Misery, Pet Semetary, Carrie, Firestarter, Christine, Dead Zone, It, all the Bachnar books, Tommyknockers are all pure and utter genius

I read an interview with him where he said he wrote Cujo pissed out of his head and high on coke so I re-read it and boy does it show…

The best writer of the 20th century

#14 Comment By Kismet Hardy On 13th February, 2007 @ 1:44 pm

King’s like a lot of great rockstars. They sober up and turn shit

#15 Comment By Tim Ireland On 13th February, 2007 @ 1:58 pm

Oops. Pardon my tangent.

:o)

#16 Comment By Kulvinder On 13th February, 2007 @ 3:05 pm

I hated the stand, i hated the long walk, i hated carrie. I gave up after that i watched the movie version of the shining…and hated it.

Far from being engrossed in his books i just feel like shouting ‘get on with it…whats your point!!…hurry up

#17 Comment By Leon On 13th February, 2007 @ 3:13 pm

I found Stephen King was something me and my mates loved as teenagers but as adults not so much…one of my favourites of his was The Dark Half.

#18 Comment By Katy On 13th February, 2007 @ 3:44 pm

The Dark Half is v good. My favourite is The Stand (unedited), and The Talisman, co-written with Peter Straub (don’t bother reading the sequel, it isn’t nearly as good). I liked Bag of Bones, too, which is one of his few very good recent books.

I liked the Dark Tower vols 1-3 and 5, but was quite disappointed by the rest of them. I think he got bored.

#19 Comment By Leon On 13th February, 2007 @ 4:11 pm

Oh god The Talisman bored me too tears so much so that I couldn’t finish it. I remember I started reading the unedited The Stand years ago on a bus (a long journey from Croydon to Camden) and just as I got to the bit about the virus breaking out random people started coughing and sneezing around me! Cue me thinking “Er!”:D

Was a good book that, shame the made for TV movie was a pile of stinking horsesh*t…

Needful Things was another fave of mine, might have to go back and re-read some of these. Anyone here ever read any Dean Koontz?

#20 Comment By William On 13th February, 2007 @ 5:24 pm

Still can’t get into novels even Stephen King ones.
But the “The Green Mile” was a superb film.

#21 Comment By William On 13th February, 2007 @ 5:25 pm

Not sure whether I should have posted 8

However

“Could tell people a few stories about old Howard but I’ll keep it zipped!!! ”

Nothing serious or bad.

#22 Comment By Leon On 13th February, 2007 @ 5:27 pm

I didn’t think much of The Green Mile, preferred Frank Darabont’s earlier King story [6] The Shawshank Redemption…

#23 Comment By Katy On 13th February, 2007 @ 5:34 pm

Oh god The Talisman bored me too tears so much so that I couldn’t finish it.

No!

This is like when my dad said that he couldn’t be bothered to finish Lord of the Rings because “there are too many names”!

I am distraught!

#24 Comment By Leon On 13th February, 2007 @ 5:38 pm

I er tried reading LoTR too and didn’t get far either…liked the films though.

#25 Comment By Katy On 13th February, 2007 @ 5:41 pm

Perhaps the whole travelling-across-mystic-land-with-kelpies thing is just not your scene. Which is probably the category that The Talisman falls into as well.

#26 Comment By Leon On 13th February, 2007 @ 5:51 pm

Not sure about that given that I spent some of my younger years obsessed with role plays, games workshop and all manner of Tolkenesq things.;) It was his writing; I just found it a chore to read, the films worked better for me…


Article printed from Pickled Politics: http://www.pickledpolitics.com

URL to article: http://www.pickledpolitics.com/archives/1005

URLs in this post:
[1] apologised yesterday: http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/main.jhtml?xml=/news/2007/02/11/nsorry11.xml
[2] comeback on IJV: http://commentisfree.guardian.co.uk/brian_klug/2007/02/brian_klug.html
[3] of support: http://comment.independent.co.uk/columnists_a_l/yasmin_alibhai_brown/article2261561.ece
[4] http://www.bmsd.org.uk/: http://www.bmsd.org.uk/
[5] http://anask.wordpress.com/2007/02/12/howard-jacobson-and-the-ijv/: http://anask.wordpress.com/2007/02/12/howard-jacobson-and-the-ijv/
[6] The Shawshank Redemption: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Shawshank_Redemption